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Sunday, July 27
 

15:00

First Time Attendee Orientation
Get the most out of Agile2014 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2014, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything. There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Sunday July 27, 2014 15:00 - 15:30
City Hall Lobby - Open Jam

15:00

Registration OPEN
Sunday July 27, 2014 15:00 - 19:00
Osceola Lobby

18:00

Early Registration Meet & Mingle
We invite everyone to kick off the conference week early by attending the Agile2014 Welcome Reception.  The Conference Registration desk will open at 3:00 pm on Sunday. Come early and miss the crowd!  Pick up your badge, registration package and an additional complimentary beverage ticket.  We hope you will join us Sunday evening!

Sunday July 27, 2014 18:00 - 19:00
Osceola Lobby
 
Monday, July 28
 

07:30

Registration OPEN
Monday July 28, 2014 07:30 - 17:30
Osceola Lobby

08:00

First Time Attendee Orientation
Get the most out of Agile2014 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2014, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything. There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Monday July 28, 2014 08:00 - 08:30
City Hall Lobby - Open Jam

08:00

Conference Breakfast
Monday July 28, 2014 08:00 - 09:00
Sun Lobby

08:00

Coaches Clinic OPEN
Monday July 28, 2014 08:00 - 17:00
Osceola Lobby

08:00

Bookstore OPEN
Monday July 28, 2014 08:00 - 18:00
Osceola Lobby

08:30

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss?  Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.  

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment.  We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam daily huddle at 8:30 in the City Hall Lobby to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join! 

Monday July 28, 2014 08:30 - 09:00
City Hall Lobby - Open Jam

09:00

Journey to Cloud Cadence (Sam Guckenheimer)
Sam describes a ten-year transformation at Microsoft Developer Division from a waterfallian box product delivery cycle of four years to Agile practices enabling a hybrid SaaS and on-prem business, with a single code base, triweekly delivery of new features in the service, and quarterly delivery for on-prem customers. He presents three waves of improvement and learning: first, the reduction of technical debt and other waste to gain trustworthy transparency, second, the increase in the flow of customer value, and third the shortening of cycle time to allow continuous feedback and continuous business improvement.

The current scale of the business is that there are millions of customer accounts each on–premise and in the cloud. This hybrid situation will exist for many years, and is a necessary part of the business.

Sam will discuss both the organizational issues of transformation and give examples from monthly service reviews of key practices and metrics, such as hypothesis-driven development, funnel analysis, performance monitoring, MTTD and MTTR improvement, log analysis, root cause remediation, scale unit replication and canarying, common code base, testing cycles, georeplication, feature flags, compatibility and  compliance testing. He will share his thoughts on the lessons learned in moving from a traditional software delivery team to a modern DevOps team.

Speakers
SG

Sam Guckenheimer

Product Owner - Microsoft Visual Studio, Microsoft
Sam Guckenheimer is the author of three books on Agile Practices, DevOps and Application Lifecycle Management, most recently Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2012: Adopting Agile Software Practices: From Backlog to Continuous Feedback. By day, Sam is the Product Owner for the Microsoft Visual Studio product line, consisting of the IDE, the SaaS offering Visual Studio Online, and Team Foundation Server.  In this capacity, he acts as the... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sun Ballroom

10:15

Conference AM Break
Monday July 28, 2014 10:15 - 10:45
Sun Lobby/Osceola Lobby

10:45

HEAD ON COLLISION: Agile QA Driving In A Waterfall World (eric hile)
Limited Capacity full

Are you in agony because your boss just came and told your Agile team it will need to work with the Waterfall group on the next big company project?  Is your current project a car wreck because Agile and Waterfall teams aren’t gelling well at all?  Are you a QA Agile team member that’s out of tricks to move your Agile/Waterfall project down the road?  Or are you in an organization that’s slowly morphing into Agile and you are searching for some low hanging fruit you can implement to help the transition? If you are road tripping your way through the questions above then take a drive through my experience with the Arbitrations project.  It will deliver not only some history of how our Agile life began, but also how I tackled the tough challenges of this project. These challenges spanned from dealing with the old guard attitude of the Waterfall teams all the way to challenging Agile stereotypes in my organization.  In the end, you’ll have a nice set of must have what to do’s and what not to do’s delivered in a retrospective format you can  leverage in your current or future project and drive that needle towards success.

Speakers


Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 11:15
Daytona

10:45

Agile: The Skinny (James Newkirk)
Limited Capacity full

What is this thing everyone calls Agile? If you have been doing software development a different way your whole career you may be wondering why should I change, what’s so different? In this introductory talk we will define why Agile is more than a process or methodology; it’s really a different approach to doing software development. To provide some additional context we’ll also:

* Look back at how the Agile methods and practices emerged

* Discuss the Agile Manifesto and 12 Principles and their resulting impact on the way that we do software development today.

* Describe what it’s like to work on Agile Project

* Describe what you can do next Monday to get started

Speakers
avatar for James Newkirk

James Newkirk

VP of Service Engineering, CenturyLink Cloud
As Tier 3's vice president of engineering, James oversees the development of Tier 3's cloud management platform. He brings almost 30 years experience in the software industry. Prior to Tier 3, James held senior leadership roles at Microsoft, Caradigm (GE/Microsoft Joint Venture) and ThoughtWorks. Earlier in his career he co-founded Object Mentor Inc with Robert C. Martin, a consulting firm that specialized in training and mentoring their... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Miami

10:45

Co-Aching: How to Use Compassion to Transform your Effectiveness (Olaf Lewitz, Michael Sahota)
Limited Capacity full

Have you ever felt your effectiveness as a coach was limited because emotions got in the way? Many of us miss out on valuable opportunities to initiate difficult conversations because of insufficient presence, empathy and compassion being available at that moment. Given all the rational challenges we face coaching in organizational change, being empathetic can be difficult.



In this hands-on workshop, you will get to practice on your own challenges when relating to individuals and systems. Learn how you may inadvertently introduce conflict. Increase your resource when engaging with people in hard situations with new options.



You will be guided through a process of increasing awareness and understanding. We will give you an opportunity to improve your ability of using compassion to increase effectiveness. You will also have an opportunity to learn what blocks you have and to start moving them.



This experience provides a perspective where you can acknowledge and appreciate a system for what it is, and what it wants for itself. Join us to learn how to let go of what you want for the system so that you stop inadvertently creating resistance thus increasing results.

Speakers
avatar for Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Trust Artist, trustartist.com
Witch, Nomad, Pioneer.Trust Artist. Connecting with people to enable them to increase trust, in themselves and others.Will stay when needed and leave when wanted.Loving and challenging.Using Scrum, Kanban, CoreProtocols, NVC, agile or better.
avatar for Michael Sahota

Michael Sahota

Guide & Certified Enterprise Coach, Agilitrix (Independent Consultant)
I believe people deliver astounding results when they have Passion and Purpose. Joy and Meaning. Creativity, Safety, Trust and Belonging. I believe we can foster work environments where people can grow and evolve to unleash their best every day. | | I help people cultivate their organizational culture. To invite a more conscious way of being and relating. To evolve organizational structures and practices that foster new ways of working... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 1/2

10:45

Coach me if you can! (Deema Dajani)
Limited Capacity full

Attendees will learn the value of coaching, through this fun game called "Agile Madness". Coaching may not be for everyone, but if you are contemplating getting a coach you will want to attend this session. I will illustrate how you can optimize this investment. I will also share real life experiences building a coach pool to scale Agile at a global Fortune 100 company. I’m here to share the good, the bad and the ugly. In the session you will learn:

* Why you may want a coach

* The difference between an "enterprise" vs "team" coach

* How to evaluate the performance of your coaches

* How to get the most value from your coach investment

* How to avoid common pitfalls impacting coach effectiveness

Speakers
avatar for Deema Dajani

Deema Dajani

Agile Coach, Rally Software
Deema Dajani is an enterprise coach and Agile enterprise transformation expert. Undertook several scaling initiatives with Pre-IPO startups, and most recently with a global Fortune 100 company, and over 7,000 technology staff, with great success and sustainable results. Certified by Ken Schwaber in 2004, she is an active practitioner with experience as SM, PO, CPO, team coach, and now as an enterprise coach and Agile enabler. Agile has been woven... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 3

10:45

Building an Airplane While Flying: Strategies for Continuous Delivery (Ryan Bergman)
Limited Capacity full

Continuous Delivery can be a hard concept for many people coming into agile. The act of continuously pushing new code into production on a regular basis can be scary. For many people the idea is so far out-there they think they couldn’t possibly achieve it and never try. This presentation will focus on different techniques for practicing continuous delivery while still controlling the end user experience and managing risk. We will look at how to manage multi-sprint “epics”, target selective groups for rollout, and protect the end users from “too much” change.

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Bergman

Ryan Bergman

Big Nerd, John Deere Intelligent Solutions Group
I care about the craft of writing good, working code. I have a passion for agile practices that help enforce repeatable, predictable behavior and produce software clients actually want to use. Areas of particular interest include SAAS architecture, application usability, CI, and testing at all levels.



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sarasota

10:45

Embracing HTTP in the era of API's (Hadi Hariri)
Limited Capacity seats available

In 75 minutes you will learn enough about the HTTP protocol, to effectively set you on the right path to create rich API's and leverage it for what it really is, which is an application protocol.



It’s all about REST in today’s world. Every service you look at, people are providing a REST API for it. Surprisingly, very few of these API’s are even REST, if we’re talking about REST as in a system that abides by a series of constraints making it RESTful. But the positive note is that it has brought to light the power of HTTP as an application protocol, something very often undervalued and misunderstood, even today.



This talk is going to focus on the core values of HTTP for what it is. It will cover all aspects including



* Headers

* Error Management

* Verbs

* Content Negotiation

* Caching

* Security

* Messages

* Request and Responses






Speakers
avatar for Hadi Hariri

Hadi Hariri

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer and creator of many things OSS, his passions includes Web Development and Software Architecture. Has authored a couple of books, a few courses and has been speaking at industry events for nearly 15 years. Currently at JetBrains leading the Developer Advocacy team. Spends as much time as he can writing code.



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 4

10:45

The Three C's of DevOps (Nathen Harvey)
Limited Capacity seats available

What is "DevOps"? Is it more than just a label placed on IT practices of successful companies?



You're coding your infrastructure, you're counting api requests per second, you've built a continuous delivery pipeline, but are you DevOp'ing?



DevOps is full of big ideas and big changes. How do you implement DevOps in your organization?



In this talk we'll introduce DevOps and discuss the three C's of DevOps: Character, Collaboration, and Community. You cannot DevOp alone, but don't worry, you are not alone; together we are redefining IT, redefining business, and redefining customer service.

Speakers
avatar for Nathen Harvey

Nathen Harvey

VP, Community Development, Chef
As the Community Director at CHEF, Nathen helps the community whip up an awesome ecosystem built around the Chef framework. Nathen also spends much of his time helping people learn about the practices, processes, and technologies that support DevOps, Continuous Delivery, and Web-scale IT. Prior to joining CHEF, Nathen spent a number of years managing operations and infrastructure for a number of web applications. Nathen is a co-host of the Food... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sun D

10:45

Principles of Lean|Agile Leadership (Dean Leffingwell)
Limited Capacity full

“It is not enough that management commit themselves to quality and productivity, they must know what it is they must do.” -- E. Deming



Scrum, XP and Agile are well established at the team level, and the concept of self-organizing, self-managing teams is becoming a new norm for the industry. However, these methods are mute, and sometimes even deprecate, the critical role that management plays in forming and leading teams, and advancing the strategic, tactical and human capital objectives of the enterprise. That does not scale. On the other hand, the current values, philosophy and behaviors of many managers may not reflect the needs of the next generation of knowledge workers. That doesn’t scale either.



Lean Thinking takes a different view, and recognizes that management must take a lead role in assuring success of a lean change initiative. In this tutorial, Dean Leffingwell describes eight key principles of Lean|Agile Leadership, principles that “Lean-Thinking Manager Teachers” can use to support, encourage and lead the changes necessary to help the enterprise achieve the business benefits that only Lean and Agile at scale can provide. Included in the presentation are specific readings and homework exercises that individuals can use to further their personal Lean|Agile learning journey.


Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

President, Leffingwell, LLC.



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Tampa

10:45

Agile Performance Appraisals without a number (Karen Greaves)
Limited Capacity seats available

Performance Appraisals. We all have them. We mostly hate or fear them. In this session I'll share my experience of both giving and receiving performance appraisals in a number of different organisations. I'll talk about what has worked and what hasn't. I'll share some industry stats that show my experience is not unique.



Then I'll share what happened when I finally had a boss who agreed to let me experiment and do it my way.

I'll tell you:

* How I did performance appraisals without giving anyone a score.

* How I used this to manage high performing and under performing staff.

* How I figured out salary increases without a score.

* How I kept HR happy with the process.

* How people felt about the process.



You'll leave the session with a new way to do performance reviews that work well for agile.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Greaves

Karen Greaves

Director, Growing Agile
As a trainer, coach and mentor I love sharing experience, ideas, failures and experiments with agile. I love meeting new people so come introduce yourself. Check out www.growingagile.co.za to see what I look like, or just listen for the loudest person in the room :) This will be my third time at Agile, despite the very long flight from Cape Town South Africa.



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola A

10:45

Mob Programming - Enabling The Self Organizing Team (Woody Zuill)
Limited Capacity filling up

### Mob Programming - Enabling The Self Organizing Team



>Leadership is “the process of creating an environment in which people become empowered.” -- Gerald M. Weinberg.





"Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done." -- From the Principles behind the Agile Manifesto. This is fundamental to the Agile approach: Individuals, Environment, Trust.



**Leadership: Self-Organizing Teams.**

This presentation will focus on the nature of "Self-Organizing teams" as a leadership approach for "empowering people". We'll introduce and discuss the concept of "Self-Organizing teams" from the Agile Principles, and explore how the team I am part of embodies this concept.



**Leadership: Provide an environment of excellence**

We'll discuss the conditions that must be present to enable "self-organizing teams", and explore the idea that leadership must provide an environment where people can excel in their work, and excel in their life. We'll see how the specific approach we follow at my workplace (Mob Programming) both enables and enhances self-organizing.



**Leadership: Individuals and Interactions**

We discovered and developed our Mob Programming approach based on the Agile idea "We Value Individuals and Interactions". We believe this is a critical aspect of Agile Software Development (and software development in general.) There will be a brief introduction to the concept of Mob Programming, and I'll share a few key practices we've adopted that allow a team of developers, QA, and business people to communicate well and work together productively.



Mob Programming is a "whole team approach" to software development. Similar to pair programming, but with more folks. We've been Mob Programming in our daily work 8 hours a day, 5 days a week for almost 3 years. You can read more about it here: [Mob Programming Site](http://bit.ly/12oS1j6). We think of it as "All the brilliant people working on the same thing, at the same time, in the same place, and on the same computer." It might sound a bit extreme, but we have found it to be a powerful way to interact and remain productive and highly effective in a sustainable manner.



**Leadership: Identify/Solve Problems at the Source**

Additionally, we have found our Self-Organizing Mob Programming approach helps eliminate (or at least lessen the effects of) many problems that typically plague software development efforts. I'll draw from some of the common problems seen in software development and teams to explore how our Mob Programming approach has lessened or eliminated them for us.



**Leadership: Reflect, Tune, Adjust frequently**

We'll wrap up by sharing an effective approach to retrospectives that we follow and which has worked nicely for us.

Speakers
avatar for Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill

Application Development Manager, Hunter Industries
I've been a software developer for 30+ years, and I'm an Agile enthusiast. I work as an Agile Coach with the original "Mob Programming" team, and have been instrumental highlighting "No Estimates" concepts. | | I've enjoy sharing my Agile experiences, and learning new things. If you are ever in the San Diego area please stop by and "Mob" with us. | | I maintain and write for both the http://mobprogramming.org website, and my own blog at... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 5/6

10:45

No Silver Bullets: What Worked for Them May Not Work for You. (Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity full

Every so often, I get a call from someone who wants to know how "agile" his company is. When I probe for more information, I often find that that manager wants to know what other companies are doing--so he can adopt their practices.



But what works at another company may not work for you. Copying what worked else where may not achieve the results you want, and may not help at all. You /can/ learn from what other companies do. But in the end, what matters is how well you are satisfying your customers, employees, and stakeholders. And that requires a unique approach based on your unique business model, culture, and value proposition.



In this talk, I'll explore the lure of silver bullets. I'll outline when looking for a best practices makes sense, and when it doesn't. I'll offer guidelines--based on my experience and research--to help you discern when to adapt a practice to your environment, and when to adapt your environment to take advantage of a practice invented by someone else.



And I'll share ideas on how you can innovate a path that reflects your unique situation.


Speakers
avatar for Esther Derby

Esther Derby

Founder, esther derby associates, inc.
I’m an expert in organizational dynamics and a leading thinker in bringing agility to organizations, management, and teams. How your company’s values are reflected in your environment, your culture and organizational dynamics, directly determines the quality and level of your success. When your company environment, culture and organizational dynamics are positive, mutually receptive and reinforcing, your people and teams have the capacity to... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Tallahassee

10:45

Clean Language Questions for Aspiring Agile Learners: Advanced Listening Skills (Andrea Chiou)
Limited Capacity filling up

Why does does listening matter? Are you planning on becoming a better listener this year?



When we don’t listen well, we don’t learn well. When we don’t ask well, we may get a response that is not free from the influence of our question. But, when we deliberately listen with the intent to discover, we maximize our learning and the thinking of the person we are listening to. We need this skill to make sure we've maximized our collective creativity, and the face-to-face interactions that we have. After a brief lesson on Clean Language questions, as well as a warm-up discovery exercise and demo, you will spend the majority of the session practicing the basic question in small pairs and small groups. I’ll talk a bit about the brain as well as about the possibilities of metaphor for bridging gaps in our mental models. Towards the end, I’ll share the history, influences and current uses of Clean Language. We'll wrap up with Q&A and takeaways - including your own resource sheet for further study.



If you want to be a better listener, enabling others to think at their best, come to this session to learn how to use Clean Language questions. You will leave energized knowing you’ll get more from all your interactions.




Speakers
avatar for Andrea Chiou

Andrea Chiou

Agile Coach, Santeon
Andrea is currently an agile coach with Santeon Group in Virginia. She has been a programmer, business analyst, team lead, project manager and coach for the past 22 years. She became passionate about coaching and facilitating IT teams after reading most all of Gerald Weinberg's books and attending his AYE Conference. Since then, on the side, she has studied Clean Language, Non-Violent Communication, Satir Change Model/Interaction Model, and... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Naples

10:45

Need to speed up? Then slow down! A practical introduction to Kanban (Mike Edwards, Al Shalloway)
Limited Capacity full

If the title grabbed your attention it’s likely because ‘slowing down to speed up’ seems counter intuitive. Too many managers believe the best way to get more work from their people is to speed up, or push more work into the system. We’ve seen too many managers add work to the pile “to ensure they don’t run out of work to do”. Unfortunately this is the worst thing you can do, as much like cars merging at a bottleneck of the highway during rush hour the high volume actually causes significant back-ups.





During this workshop we will use the dot game where as a development team you will be creating a product according to customer specs. Through a refinement of the exercise we will demonstrate the impact of too much work in the system, the bottlenecks, and strategies for improving the flow of work. Participants will come away with an understanding of the basic mechanics and concepts behind Kanban. Most importantly participants will come away with a better understanding of the nature of work, and the impact our behaviours have on the outcome.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Edwards

Mike Edwards

Agile Coach, Leanintuit
Mike Edwards started his career more than 25 years ago as a software developer.?Mike has spent the past 15 years leading teams of all shapes and sizes. When Mike? stumbled across Lean and Agile numerous years ago it rocked his belief system and? forever changed how he views our work. Mike now helps organizations transform how they do business through the use of Lean & Agile. Mike helps organizations transform their business through a... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sanibel

10:45

Staying in the Sweet Spot (Ron Jeffries, Chet Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity filling up

Tell us about the time you and your team were in the sweet spot of agile. What got you there? What tried to push you out of the sweet spot? Talk with us about what people can do to get to the sweet spot, and stay there.

Speakers
CH

Chet Hendrickson

HendricksonXP
RJ

Ron Jeffries

www.xprogramming.com


Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Gainesville

10:45

'Does my bum look big in this?' Learn to inform constructively. (Emma Armstrong)
Limited Capacity seats available

OK, we lied, there is never a right way to say “yes” to that question. However, as testers (and most roles), there are times when we have to communicate negative or difficult messages to others. It’s vital that we can learn to do this without generating emotional situations, destroying people’s trust or causing conflict.



More generally though, have you ever said something that someone has completely misinterpreted? Most of us work in teams, and even though communication seems simple and is something we do every day, a lot of our communication is misunderstood, which can lead to developing the wrong thing! This is further complicated for teams that aren't co-located.



Learning ways to communicate helps us to understand people and situations better, which helps to create an environment where problem solving and idea creation can thrive. A team which has good, open communication can collaborate towards the right end product. Being a good communicator and being able to resolve any differences means you build the trust and respect of your team and business stakeholders that you need to be able to do your job well.

This session is suitable for testers of any experience level, as well as team members in any discipline who are interested in improving tester-coder communication and collaboration. The session will:

-look at all the ways we communicate daily, then focus on the key communications of a test engineer and ways to do this well.

-look at the information testing can provide and ways to communicate that information so that it is received well.

-identify one of the key skills a team needs, which is even more key as a tester helping to deliver quality.

-look at ways to build communication skills within common meetings within the agile process.

-identify key ways to maintain good communication within distributed teams.

Speakers
EA

Emma Armstrong

Mrs, Red Gate
Emma Armstrong is a test engineer and all-round do-gooder at Red Gate, and has been baking quality into software for over 13 years. In that time she’s gotten her hands dirty with both manual and automated testing and had the opportunity to dig into everything from compilers to web applications. | She’s worked with most methodologies, gotten to grips with technologies ranging from chipset hardware to UI (and everything in between), managed... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sun C

10:45

How to use ATDD to help deliver quality software in Kanban or Scrum process. (Adam Yuret)
Limited Capacity seats available

How much time and effort in even agile software development organizations is lost to rework, defects, technical debt and building the wrong things?



How much of this failure demand is caused by not talking to each other?



Acceptance Test Driven Development is one way of talking to each other that can help us mitigate some of those risks in our development process.



ATDD is an collaborative approach to achieving shared-understanding using concrete examples discovered collaboratively.



During this session we'll cover:



What is a user story? (You think you know but you might be surprised)



The process consists of the following steps:

- Story Workshops for every story in the prioritized backlog are conducted wherein a tester, a programmer and a customer (or proxy if that's all that is available) have an informal conversation about what the meaning and intent of the story are.



Asking "What does x mean?" types of questions and capturing user/business centered acceptance criteria. Using those criteria as a splitting heuristic and other approaches to split stories into small vertical slices of value using a slightly modified INVST model for user stories. Further distilling those acceptance criteria into concrete examples (tests) to help guide development



- Taking the byproducts of the ATDD story workshop and turning them into the following useful tools for informing development:

- Acceptance level test automation using unit tests or domain specific language tool (e.g. Cucumber, FitNesse etc.)

- Concrete examples to help guide paired dev/test development of production code.

- A guide for helping create a zero-tolerance policy for acceptance level defects.



This workshop will start with a discussion of ATDD basics followed by a mock user story workshop. We'll deconstruct a user story, collaboratively identify acceptance criteria and concrete examples. Wrapping up with a brief discussion of ATDD-friendly tools.



We'll go beyond these concepts and workshop to answer the often unanswered questions:



"Sure but who has time for all this?"



"We're sprinting so we have to develop as fast as possible, we don't have time to talk to each other?"



"We're doing Kanban, when do we have workshops if we have no structured planning meeting ritual?



"Isn't this big design up front?"



We'll also touch upon what a user story workshop isn't and ATDD anti-patterns to be avoided.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Yuret

Adam Yuret

Founder/Consultant, Context Driven Agility
Adam Yuret is an experienced systems thinker who has consulted small non-profits and fortune 100 clients on adopting context-driven systems to solving difficult problems. Adam started Context Driven Agility in 2010 to share his passion for humanistic flow-based systems full time. He’s been consulting organizations and teams to adapt to their respective contexts using collaborative approaches and lean principles to great effect. Context Driven... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola B

11:30

When the Business Wants Waterfall: Implementing Agile in a Phase-Based Environment (Marjorie Farmer)
Limited Capacity full

Corporations often put processes in place that assume a waterfall approach to projects. This can put software teams in a bind. Learn how Halliburton implemented an agile-based process for software development while still allowing software projects to comply with the corporate standard waterfall process framework. It covers the specifics of how agile was mapped into the existing waterfall process, the adjustments to the framework required in order to allow agility, the challenges encountered and how they were resolved, and the value received by the corporation by adopting this approach.

Speakers
MF

Marjorie Farmer

Chief Project Manager, Halliburton



Monday July 28, 2014 11:30 - 12:00
Daytona

12:00

Conference Lunch
Monday July 28, 2014 12:00 - 14:00
Osceola ABCD

12:00

Exhibits OPEN
Monday July 28, 2014 12:00 - 15:45
Osceola C&D

12:15

First Time Attendee Orientation
Get the most out of Agile2014 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2014, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything. There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.

Monday July 28, 2014 12:15 - 12:45
City Hall Lobby - Open Jam

14:00

Portfolio Kanban - Seeing the Bigger Picture (Sandy Mamoli)
Limited Capacity full

Doing too many things at once can slow an entire organisation down. AEvery successful organisation will have more great ideas than they have capacity to build, and it is tempting to start too many of them at the same time. However, too many projects in progress will slow down delivery of each and every one of them. This is exactly what happened to us at Trade Me, New Zealand’s biggest eCommerce platform.



Using the example of Trade Me, a 300 person company, I will demonstrate the practical application of Portfolio Kanban. I will show how we managed to: reduce our work in progress by blocking projects; work on the important rather than urgent stuff through visualisation and shared prioritisation; and explore how Trade Me are using Portfolio Kanban to direct the organisation’s Agile teams.



In this session I will describe how we managed to bridge the gap between theory and practice and share some ideas for how to put the principles of Kanban into action.



Come along and enjoy tales of our successes, challenges and struggles on our (ongoing) journey towards awesome portfolio management.

Speakers
avatar for Sandy Mamoli

Sandy Mamoli

Director of All Things Agile, Nomad8
Sandy Mamoli é consultora Ágil na Nomad8, com ênfase em cultura e liderança. Trabalhou em Amsterdam e Copenhagen para se tornar uma das principais Coaches da Nova Zelândia, ela compartilha o seu talento prático e uma paixão para advogar em nome da Agilidade para negócios ao redor do mundo. Sandy é ex-atleta olímpica, geek, viciada em gadgets e palestrante internacional... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 14:30
Daytona

14:00

Agile Teams: Self-Organizing, Collocated, and Distributed (Jutta Eckstein)
Limited Capacity full

Agile development requires teams to self-organize. However, this doesn’t happen by chance. Teams have to be set up in a way that allows them to self-organize. And moreover, if you work on a large project with more than one team the team structure should still enable self-organization. The same is true for global development.

In this session we will cover the essentials for building productive self-organizing teams for small and collocated and as well for large and distributed settings.

Speakers
avatar for Jutta Eckstein

Jutta Eckstein

IT communication
Jutta Eckstein works as an independent coach, consultant, and trainer. She holds a M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, a Dipl.Eng. in Product-Engineering, and a B.A. in Education. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an Agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying Agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects. She has published her experience in her books 'Agile... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Miami

14:00

What would it mean to Coach an Agile Enterprise? (Michael Spayd)
Limited Capacity filling up

Enterprise agility is both a hugely popular aspiration and a widely misunderstood buzzword. Many of us as Agile coaches wonder how we can lead and catalyze agility at an organizational level. Our intentions are earnest, but our skills and understanding are partial. This interactive talk will explore what it would mean to coach across an enterprise, from an executive's leadership maturity to the limits of culture, from organization structures to value creating processes.



Drawing on 12 years as an enterprise Agile coach, I developed the **Integral Agile Transformation** framework (upcoming book, *Coaching the Agile Enterprise*), which includes the four prime perspectives -- *psychological*, *behavioral*, *cultural* and *systemic*. These perspectives help reveal both our limits and our strengths as enterprise agile coaches, all four of which are needed for a successful transformation. Each implies a type of competency and a mindset required to leverage the perspective. Further, we'll explore four levels of developmental complexity (from Spiral Dynamics) to understand what is actually possible for a given organization and individuals with whom we work.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Spayd

Michael Spayd

Chief Executive, Agile Coaching Institute, LLC
Since 2001, I have been immersed in Agile & Lean thinking and practices. From the beginning, I was drawn into large-scale transformation initiatives, especially the change and cultural aspects. I love to work at all levels of an organization, from teams and their managers to project offices and execs. I have educated thousands of people, coached scores of teams and worked with well over a hundred managers. I am currently writing a book entitled... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola A

14:00

Agile Families: Techniques for Living Peacefully with Change (David Starr)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile values and practices transformed the workplace, but Agile at home? You bet! Effective agile techniques and behaviors help families and teams improve while dealing with the inevitable change of daily life. In this session we'll explore everyday life through an agile lens!



This session explores topics like weekly family meetings, collective team accountability, and even peer review for chores. Get pointers for parents, leaders, team members, and managers learning to accommodate unique personalities.



For over 8 years, the Starr family has been using techniques borrowed from agile teams to foster creativity, collective ownership, and self-organization. The Starr’s practices have been covered in an IEEE paper, a TED Talk on the subject, and in the book “Secrets of Happy Families”.

Speakers
DS

David Starr

Elegant Code
David Starr is the Program Chair for all Technical Tracks at this year's Agile conference, He is Director of Technical Training for GoDaddy, and occasionally consults for organizations looking to improve their technical outcomes using agility,



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola B

14:00

The Girl With the Chisel Tip Marker (Lynne Cazaly)
Limited Capacity full

One of the quickest ways to achieve greater buy-in, clearer communication and higher levels of engagement with team members, stakeholders, sponsors and business units is to get "visual agility".



Visual Agility is about three things:

- Capturing - the information, thinking and ideas of the team, stakeholders and sponsors

- Conveying - that information in a way that’s compelling and easy to understand

- Collaborating - using innovative tools that bring people together to think, talk and do great things



Visual agility. Yes its about using cards, stories, post it notes… but it's also about using visual charts, maps, models, metaphors, and most of all, hand crafted "drawn-in-the-moment" visuals.



If you're thinking you can't draw so well (or at all !), Lynne's session will boost your capability, instantly. And if you've already got some sketching skills up your sleeve, Lynne's session will guide you so you can finesse, develop and mature your visual thinking capability for even greater public display!



In agile we often speak about making work visible, showing progress, visualising solutions, scoping out possibilities. Having 'visual agility' gives you the capability and confidence to step into any role at a moment's notice and help bring clarity to the problem, quicker. This is more than sketch noting for your own use; it's for bringing clarity to situations and communicating and collaborating through complexity.



You'll learn some of the most highly engaging ways to facilitate with visuals in an agile world and come away with 60 visual images and icons to put to work straight away.



Lynne will be live drawing to show you what to do, how to apply it and what it can look like.


Speakers
avatar for Lynne Cazaly

Lynne Cazaly

Owner, Lynne Cazaly
Lynne Cazaly is a keynote speaker, author and adviser. She is the author of the books: | | - Making Sense: A Handbook for the Future of Work | - Create Change: How to apply innovation in an era of uncertainty, and | - Visual Mojo: How to capture thinking, convey information and collaborate using visuals. | | She works with executives, senior leaders and project teams on major change and transformation projects. She helps... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Naples

14:00

Refactor Like A Pro (Christopher Freeman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Refactoring tools can change the way we develop software, but it’s sometimes difficult for people to learn and adopt the strategic thinking required to fully embrace the possibilities.



We will start by reviewing the definition of refactoring and discussing its implications. I will demonstrate refactoring in a variety of languages, with and without tools. We will explore what refactoring means at a range of scales, from an expression to an architecture. We will also compare several refactoring methods and processes. To finish, we will each create personal plans to adopt and exercise these skills.



I intend for you to come away from this presentation with a deeper appreciation of why refactoring is important, and how you can leverage it to greater advantage than you might be now.

Speakers
CF

Christopher Freeman

Outpace Systems, Inc.



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sun D

14:00

So long, and thanks for all the tests (Seb Rose)
Limited Capacity filling up

Software development is hard. Unit testing and Test Driven Development (TDD) can make it easier, but only if done well - and that takes time. In this session we will cover:

- HOW these practices can help your project,

- WHAT you can do to get better at them and

- WHY your boss should care.



You’ll learn about project risk and how developer testing can improve the chances of a successful delivery. You’ll see how developer tests don’t just protect against regression, but also act as a primary source of documentation. And we’ll take a few hints from the ancient Egyptians!



You might have heard people say:

- “Tests make it hard to refactor.”

- “The customer doesn’t care how many tests there are.”

- “If we had to work the way the agile gurus tell us, nothing would ever get done.”

If you’ve ever struggled to respond to these challenges, then this session is for you.



A note about the title: In Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy the dolphins leave planet earth before it gets destroyed, with their last enigmatic message “So long, and thanks for all the fish” being misinterpreted. Is our software giving us the same message? After all, the software would still perform the same function without the tests, wouldn’t it?

Speakers
SR

Seb Rose

Claysnow
Seb Rose is an independent software developer, trainer and coach based in the UK. He specialises in working with teams adopting and refining their agile practices, with a particular focus on delivering software through the use of examples. | | He first worked as a programmer in 1980 writing applications for estate agents and solicitors in compiled BASIC on an Apple II. He has worked with many mainstream technologies since then, for many... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sarasota

14:00

DevOps: How to Fail with One Weird Trick (Pete Cheslock)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:

In the last few years, I have been a through massive organizational shifts as two different companies attempted to embrace DevOps. Both companies were experiencing extreme growth, and both companies wanted faster iterations with more management visibility. Both companies believed that DevOps was the answer, and thus created new organizational units to tackle their problems. How these two companies chose to implement their first iteration of a "DevOps Culture" differed, but both ultimately ended in the same fashion, failure. As Conway's Law suggests, the creation of a new silo normally causes more problems with your company's communication structures. These cases were no different.



We often spend a large amount of time focusing on The Right Way™ to do things. Many companies believe they can cargo-cult the solutions they read about in books and blogs and make it fit in their organization. This is often where many company's first attempt at DevOps fails. It is hard to blame people for continually falling into the same trap; they want to believe there is an easy solution to their organizational issues. Every day managers are being inundated with "DevOps Solutions" and "DevOps Toolkits," but while many people are trying to sell DevOps, it's not something you can buy.



In my experience, new initiatives often fail due to organizational biases. How do you overcome those biases? Can you overcome something that is so deeply entrenched? Are these biases something you even need to change, or can you change the rules of the game instead to affect the outcome?



We'll discuss:



The history and background of each company.

The decisions that were made to influence change (including the intended outcome).

The actual outcomes that occurred.

What we took away from each failure - and how the company changed.

Speakers
avatar for Pete Cheslock

Pete Cheslock

Sr Director, Ops and Support, Threat Stack



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 4

14:00

Why Is Agile Failing in Large Enterprises and What You Can Do About It (Mike Cottmeyer)
Limited Capacity full

Agile works… we get it. You don’t have to sell people on the underlying principles anymore. Agile has gone mainstream. That said, many large scale agile transformations efforts are struggling. Many transformations have failed. Many organizations are on their second or third attempt and can’t figure out why things aren't working. It’s easy to blame the people. It’s easy to blame the process. It’s easy to blame the culture, and it’s especially easy to blame the management.



While all these factors may certainly come into play, the underlying problem is that most large organizations just weren’t built to be agile. Our challenge then is to figure out how to safely and pragmatically begin refactoring your company into the kind of organization that can adopt agile and sustain the transformation at scale. Refactoring an enterprise takes careful planning and commitment, and must be done in a way demonstrates value early and preserves your ability to make and meet near term commitments



This talk will begin by introducing a framework for understanding the type of company you work in, it's delivery constraints, and the business drivers that are likely working against your agile transformation. We’ll follow by exploring a strategy for establishing an end state vision and operational model to guide your transformation. Finally, we’ll define an approach for incrementally introducing change, measuring outcomes, and sustaining the change once things really get going.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Cottmeyer

Mike Cottmeyer

CEO, LeadingAgile
LeadingAgile co-founder and CEO, Mike Cottmeyer is passionate about solving the challenges associated with Agile in larger, more complex enterprises. To that end, he and his team are dedicated to providing large-scale Agile transformation services to help pragmatically, incrementally, and safely introduce Agile methods. He spends most of his time leading and growing LeadingAgile, doing sales and business development, developing content, and... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Tallahassee

14:00

Presentation Karaoke (Arlo Belshee)
Limited Capacity seats available

Tired of long talks by practiced speakers with great slides? You'll find none of those here! Submit topic ideas (Agile or not). Then watch people come give a 2-minute talk on a random topic to a random deck. Ever tried to talk about elephant management to a deck of pictures of nebulae? Try it and receive thundering applause! You might learn something profound, but we won't guarantee it. The only guarantee is that fun will be had by all.

Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Sr. Program Mgr, Microsoft
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. | | More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant you will ever need to hire. After 6 months, you should be able to adapt your culture, practices, and company structures to meet novel challenges, each... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Tampa

14:00

Teaching Agile to Management (Jason Tanner)
Limited Capacity full

Looking for a straightforward explanation of how to lead effectively as your organization adopts Agile? Searching for ways to tailor your current training approaches to effectively support leadership adoption of Scrum and being Agile?



While many classes and workshops address the needs of team members, very few if any courses address the needs of company and product leaders. This workshop is designed for people who need to teach and coach organizational leaders — CxOs, VPs, Directors, Managers and product leaders. In short, any stakeholder outside the team. Come learn what worked and didn't work to teach Agile and Scrum values, principles, roles and practices to over 400 directors & executives. Leave with tools to use immediately after the conference.



During the second half of last year, I had the rare opportunity to design and deliver a learning experience to a large swath of the director and above population of a 30,000+ employee company. In the course of teaching leaders from multiple business units in 30 workshops, I learned a lot about their learning needs and how to help them achieve their learning goals. My goal is to share this experience with the Agile community to (1) provide a framework for others to use and (2) help others avoid the pitfalls I encountered.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Tanner

Jason Tanner

CEO, Applied Frameworks, Inc.
Jason Tanner is the CEO of Applied Frameworks, a product management consulting firm. Jason’s passion is coaching people to develop products that customers love. He mentors, teaches, facilitates and sometimes does the work to identify and apply the optimal frameworks for a situation. Lately he’s been focused on very large scale Agile adoption and overcoming all of the obstacles thousands of people encounter when their world of work shifts... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 3

14:00

Cost of Delay workshop (Ozlem Yuce, Joshua Arnold)
Limited Capacity seats available

Quantifying Cost of Delay: Why is it the “one thing” to quantify? How do I do it?
Don Reinertsen says that if you only quantify one thing, quantify the Cost of Delay. As we’ve talked about before, quantifying Cost of Delay not only helps improve prioritisation, it also help with making trade-off decisions, creates a sense of urgency, and changes the focus of the conversation. Maybe this has got you interested in experimenting with it, but you’re not sure how to get started? If so, this workshop is specifically for you!

When people hear about Cost of Delay they sometimes doubt whether their organisation is ready for it. They say things like, “We don’t have the maturity for it”, or “We couldn’t do that because our stakeholders wouldn’t support it”. We’ve heard people say this too. And yet, in hindsight, people find it much easier than they thought! We will show you how to get started with using Cost of Delay, despite these doubts.

Building blocks
The first essential building block is to understand the value. To help structure the conversation we will use a simple economic framework to surface the assumptions and drive to the economic impacts. The second essential building block is to understand the urgency. For this, we will look at different urgency curves to help us understand how value is likely to decay over time. Combining these two gives us the Cost of Delay helping us to question and better understand what our gut tells us about value and urgency.

Practice makes perfect!
To get going, we will start by looking at some simplified scenarios that help you put what you’ve learned about Cost of Delay into practice. You’ll work at your own pace through some simple exercises that test different aspects of your understanding. To really embed it, once you’re done you’ll get a chance to help others around you – you become the teacher. We will then quickly reflect on what we’ve learned so far.

Then, we’re all going to work on quickly estimating the Cost of Delay for a real life example for a real company. You’ll do this in pairs making assumptions you need to get to a cost of delay for the feature in dollars per week. To help us learn about what the key assumptions were we will compare results across the group to help us understand what the value might be and the areas of greatest uncertainty.

To wrap up we’re going to ask you to do a mini-retrospective about what you’ve learned and what your puzzles are. If we have any time left, we’re happy to help you have a go with a feature or project you are working with.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of this session you should be able to go back to your organisation armed with a better understanding of what Cost of Delay is, why it’s useful and be confident enough to apply it.


  • Learn about an economic framework for estimating value

  • Learn about the most common urgency profiles we see

  • Do some exercises to work out the Cost of Delay for a set of scenarios

  • Get some practice with helping others to calculate the Cost of Delay

  • Learn about the assumptions we often need to make in order to calculate Cost of Delay.

  • Get to a Cost of Delay figure (in dollars per week) for a real situation, compare and contrast with others.

  • Be able to calculate the Cost of Delay for your own Project or Feature.




Speakers
avatar for Joshua Arnold

Joshua Arnold

Engineer, blackswanfarming.com
With a background in fluid mechanics and systems engineering, Joshua has worked for the past decade with various organisations to improve their systems of innovation and delivery. In particular, Joshua has focused on the problem of prioritisation and portfolio management, helping to bring the fuzzy-front-end of development into focus and aligned toward faster time-to-market and improved return on investment. | | He recently co-authored an... Read More →
avatar for Ozlem Yuce

Ozlem Yuce

Agile Transformation Lead, Maersk Line
https://twitter.com/OzzieYuce


Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sun C

14:00

Experimenting with Bulk Estimation (Dan Greening)
Limited Capacity full

Estimating lots of backlog items can help your Product Owner make more profitable tradeoffs, your product become more successful, and your developers create sustainable product architectures. You can make your grooming meetings shorter, more fun, more useful and more predictive with bulk estimation.



Many teams suffer from having few or no estimated backlog items outside the current Sprint. When I ask them “Why?” they usually say, “Estimation takes too long, and it’s boring.”



Estimation motivates a deep thinking process within teams. Failing to estimate deeply disempowers both the team and the Product Owner, in these ways



* The team has to work under poorly-forecast ship dates

* The team has insufficient information to create and lay the groundwork for appropriate architectures.

* The team has little context to motivate useful innovation.

* The Product Owner can’t order the backlog items by profit.



Bulk estimation helps teams estimate about 60 stories an hour. It is a form of affinity estimation that incorporates reference stories and planning poker. It quickly identifies stories that need more detail. Its estimates are highly correlated with one-by-one Planning Poker. Current statistical results show that an uninvolved team can provide decent relative estimates, helping the organization when a team hasn't yet been assembled.



In this workshop, I will explain the approach, have attendees divide into teams, and then run bulk estimation on real backlog items. At the end we'll gather the data and show how different team results correlate with one-by-one Planning Poker. We'll discuss the composition of the different teams, and draw conclusions about when bulk estimation makes sense.



This workshop is a real-time statistics experiment. We will attempt to clearly answer this question: Can super-fast estimation give us sufficient consistency to forecast release dates accurately, and when?


Speakers
avatar for Dan Greening

Dan Greening

Enterprise Coach, LeadingAgile
I teach, coach and consult on Scrum and agile management practices for CxOs and below. I have served in product and engineering leadership positions in startups and software enterprises. I focus on long-term value creation while implementing and sustaining agility. Unlike some colleagues, I strongly believe managers should add significant strategic value to agile companies. At the same time, I coach and teach engineering teams and departments, to... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sanibel

14:00

How certain are you? How often are you wrong? (David Hussman)
Limited Capacity filling up

Some of the biggest misses come when people are overly certain. We are often over certain about process choice, product choices and technology choices just to name a few. Join us to discuss how we struggle when we are overly certain and how we often fail to stop to consider if we might be wrong.

Speakers
avatar for David Hussman

David Hussman

Founder, DevJam
I split my time between leading DevJam and coaching at client sites. My coaching ranges from small teams to large enterprises and entails working with teams, programs and leadership groups. Some days I am doing discovery work, teaching product thinking and agile design and augmenting real agility with user centered design and user experience tools. Other days I am deep in the delivery space helping teams adapt agile methods to meet their needs... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Gainesville

14:00

The changing role of software tester in Agile environment (Anna Royzman)
Limited Capacity filling up

Several years ago my company reorganized into product units, and my QA manager position became obsolete. The new reality was not comfortable at first, until, some time and practice later I recognized that my test manager/strategist skills are equally important and applicable to the new role of a tester on the Agile cross-functional team. That synthesis emerged into a new role of a “peer leader” which I later identified as a new trend — through conversations with Agile coaches and thought leaders of our industry. I called this role a “Quality Leader”.



I firmly believe that an advancement of the testing profession is calling for leaders, fully versed in testing strategies, equipped with the knowledge of psychology and team dynamics, who know how to effectively apply all available team’s assets (skills, knowledge, tools, time, etc.) to optimize the delivery of a quality product. Quality Leaders are motivators and educators who can transform every team member into the quality advocate.



Quality Leader skills are in demand now, and, as I foresee, will be in even higher demand in the future. No matter which position you hold now, if you are a member of an Agile team that delivers software products, you will need to advance yourself in order to advance the team to the next level of productivity. To be successful in this endeavor, you have to evaluate your current position and what sets you aside, make an analysis on what the team needs and in what ways you can add most value. We will discuss what’s unique about the Quality Leader role and what skills are needed to succeed.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Royzman

Anna Royzman

President, A Quality Leadership Institute, Inc.
Anna Royzman is the founder of A Quality Leadership Institute, the non-profit organization, whose goal is to become the leading advocate for quality in technology through innovative educational programs. A Quality Leadership Institute is developing and supporting such programs as Test Masters Academy, provider of high demanded education in software testing and quality, and Test Management Practices Research by Prof. Robert Sabourin and... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 5/6

14:00

Uncover the Secrets Your Customers Wish You Knew (Jeremy Kriegel)
Limited Capacity filling up

"What if we're wrong?"

"What don't we know?"

"What did we not even think to ask?"



These are powerful questions that have the ability to change the course of any project. Finding the answers can be scary, but you don't need to be a Sherlock, Mulder, House, or even a UX research expert to get out of your bubble and find some answers. You know that relying only on internal experts can be limiting, but getting out there can be intimidating. However, your customers *want* to talk to you. They want to tell you everything you need to know to make them successful.



In this interactive session, you'll learn a repeatable framework for identifying your biggest risks, how to formulate a plan to address them, who you need to talk to, and how to find and engage them. We'll cover how to ask good questions and to separate real insights from false leads. You'll use your current situation for the exercises so that you will have the outline of a plan that you can start to execute. Even if you don't have the benefit of expert researchers, you can learn how to effectively engage your customers to learn the secrets they desperately want you to know.




Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Kriegel

Jeremy Kriegel

UX Manager, BzzAgent
Jeremy Kriegel has been designing great user experiences (UX) for 18 years. Just as we need to understand the needs and context of users to craft a design solution, Jeremy believes that success also requires us to look at the business context to craft an appropriate design process. From start-ups to Fortune 100 companies, as a consultant or on an internal team, he has seen a lot of different scenarios that each required their own approach. He... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 1/2

14:45

Growing pains - Scaling Agile to achieve greater capability in service delivery (Mia Horrigan)
Limited Capacity full

The organisation had grown from 200 employees to 700 over three years. The Service delivery team were finding it difficult to keep up with the growth. They had a backlog of work, process issues, waste in the resourcing model and quality issues. The innovative, "can do" attitude was still there but we were having growing pains.



To achieve portfolio growth aims for the organisation and delivery for clients, we decided to create a modern, robust and effective product strategy, development and delivery capability that could be scaled to the whole organisation through training and mentoring team in Scrum and Lean delivery.



Our Aim was to:

• Improve quality of product delivery

• Improve trust in the organisation’s products

• Improve capability to manage the value stream of products – from conception through to delivery with reduced risk and improved bottom-line.

• Improve predictability of estimates on costs of product development

• Increase transparency of the value stream and product pipeline.

• Maximise the revenue stream through a focus on quantifying value and removing waste over reduction in costs.



What we did was develop governance, risk and product management frameworks to support and optimise lean delivery while maximising ROI and implement Scrum and Scaled Agile frameworks to assist the organisation to scale its agile capability.

We started with the project teams and then created a roadmap for deployment of the strategy at a program level as well as throughout the enterprise.



To alleviate our growing pains, the resourcing model for the organisation needed to change so we totally restructured the teams. Project managers were replaced by product owners. Focus on billable hours and utilisation was replaced with team sprint goals and WIP limits. We created multidisciplinary teams and removed the functional reporting lines and created feature driven teams that focused on the user's view and use of our products. The team members were at first overwhelmed by starting this process mid delivery of some products, however we employed a Scrum coach to help mentor us through the process and work the product owners and master scrum master.

Speakers
avatar for Mia Horrigan

Mia Horrigan

Country Director of Service Delivery, Orion Health
Mia leads the service delivery implementation team in Australia. Mia's focus is on delivering value to customers as efficiently as possible and ensuring that the Orion Health Team develop and grow their delivery capabilities | | Since joining Orion, Mia has been working with the Global Product Development team to present a program roadmap and technology transition plan to one of Australia's key clients and Mia was a key advocate for the change... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 14:45 - 15:15
Daytona

15:45

Taking Agile Passion to a Volunteer Fire Department – A Report From the Fire Line (Thomas O'Connor)
Limited Capacity seats available

We all have passions outside of our careers and most of us spend some of our valuable time with nonprofit and volunteer organizations to achieve our work/life balance. In this session, the audience will learn how Agile Coach and Divide Fire Protection District Fire Chief Tom O’Connor has adapted agile principles with fighting fires and other emergencies.



The Agile community has shown success with for-profit organizations, as we have helped them become more effective and efficient through our agile coaching. Unfortunately, these practices are seldom seen in nonprofits and volunteer organizations, such as a volunteer fire department and we have an opportunity for social change and improvement through our expertise and experience.


Speakers


Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 16:15
Daytona

15:45

Agile Leaders Recognizing and Removing Impediments (Thomas Perry)
Limited Capacity full

When not uncovered and resolved, impediments can do harm to an otherwise well run project in ways that are often subtle and easy to miss. If impediments undermine the success of our teams, then we as project managers, leaders, and stakeholders should all be very passionate about removing impediments. In order to accomplish this we need to do three things: we need to give impediments the proper attention, we need to become experts at uncovering them, and we need to integrate them into the process of continuous improvement within the team.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Perry

Thomas Perry

Sr. Principal Transformation Coach, CA
Tom has been working in software development for over 20 years. He has worked on teams at startup companies, large corporations in the Fortune 100 and the State and Federal Government. His background includes testing, development, project/program management, agile coaching/mentoring and training. As part of his involvement in the greater agile community, he led the Seattle eastside chapter of the APLN. Tom speaks at a wide variety of software... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Miami

15:45

Engineering powerful insights and profound conversations across the organisation: The Lens (Martin Kearns, Daryl Chan)
Limited Capacity filling up

It’s not easy to guide organisations in becoming truly adaptive. How do you facilitate better executive-level decision making with respect to the impact further down the chain? How do you have coaching conversations with effects that are seen, heard and felt across the board? How do you have all encompassing, inclusive discussions which drive an enterprise towards a truly shared vision?



Agile is part of the answer, but to truly achieve amazing results from the ways we interact with each other, we believe that we also need to unlock the insight, wisdom and energy held captive within our teams and organisations. We have created a key, and we call it ‘The Lens’. It's an engineered environment orientated around dialogue, transparency and co-creation, fostered through a combination of physical narrative and engineered experience for everyone from C-level executive to C# programmer and beyond.



We’d like you to come share our journey and get some hands-on experience with how the 'The Lens' works and the techniques used to stimulate enquiry, curiosity and introspection. We hope you’ll walk away with a fresh perspective on how to discover the answers to the tough questions, and the confidence to begin co-creating a new world for all of us.

Speakers
avatar for Daryl Chan

Daryl Chan

Business Analyst, SMS Management and Technology
I believe that whilst it is important to get the job done right, I also believe it is equally important to ask “Are we doing the right thing?”. I enjoy considering the response to that question from individual, team, organisational and social perspectives as a step on the way to doing better, for each other, and together. | | I'm a Business Analyst with a process improvement and technology background, having worked for over seven... Read More →
avatar for Martin Kearns

Martin Kearns

National Capability Lead for Agile and Innovation, SMSMT / Agile 42
Martin Kearns is the National Capability Lead for Agile services at SMS MT. Martin is one for the first Certified Scrum Coaches in the world, he enjoys leading the development of an enterprise agile capability within organizations to support the business strategies of a diverse set of clients. Martin's forte is in the coaching of individuals and organizations to improve their application of the agile process and to build high performance teams... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Gainesville

15:45

The Science Behind Coaching (Ram Srinivasan)
Limited Capacity seats available

Are you an experienced coach looking to take your game to the next level? Even experts can lose sight of core principles when they don’t understand why some coaching practices often succeed or fail.



Join me as we explore the science behind coaching. Recent research on brain and social cognition provide insights into how different coaching techniques work, and circumstances under which they may not. Leave this session armed with knowledge that will help you become an even stronger coach by understanding how people think/act and how you can improvise to be more effective.


Speakers
RS

Ram Srinivasan

Ram Srinivasan has a very unique distinction of being a Certified Scrum Trainer, an Innovation Games Qualified Instructor and a Professional Coach who specializes in coaching teams and organizations. His mission is to help his clients build great organizations and he does this by focusing on people, process and product development. | | Ram also frequently talks at local meetups, PMI chapters and conferences on various topics like... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sun D

15:45

Exploiting Fast and Slow Thinking (Rebecca Wirfs-Brock)
Limited Capacity seats available

As thinking human beings and agile team members we can benefit from knowing more about how we think, deliberate and decide. Agile teams rely on trust, transparency, collaboration, and collective decision-making. “Thinking, Fast and Slow,” by Daniel Kahneman explains two systems that drive how we think. System 1 thinking is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slow, deliberate, and logical.



In this session you will learn how fast and slow thinking affects your reactions, behaviors, and decision-making. You’ll explore how several agile practices amplify and exploit your thinking abilities and where they might lead you astray. For example, the Given-When-Then BDD scenarios are concrete and specific. They prevent us from leaping to conclusions about expected results. Those same BDD specs can also lead you to believe that that’s all there is. The Pomodoro Technique helps block work into manageable chunks, making time for uninterrupted slow thinking. But what else might you do?



Fast thinking works pretty well in a well-known context. You save time when you don’t have to deliberate over details and nuances in order to make informed decisions. But fast thinking can lead to extremely poor decisions. You might jump to conclusions, be wildly optimistic, or greatly under-assess risks and rewards. You need to exploit both fast and slow thinking on agile projects. And you need to be acutely aware of when fast thinking is tripping you up.



During this session you will explore some impacts of fast and slow thinking and share with others where you might need to slow down or speed up. You will practice reframing your questions and concerns about specific situations in terms of fast and slow thinking. And you’ll identify some specific situations where your thinking needs to shift and explore how you might make those shifts.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

President, Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme. I'm also keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, pragmatic TDD, and techniques for architecting and reducing risk on agile projects and programs. I'm a slow jogger... if anyone is interested in early morning runs while at Agile 2014 it'd be fun to meet and go on a run.



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola B

15:45

Gamify The Card Wall (Craig Strong)
Limited Capacity full

A fundamental Agile principle is ‘Continuous Improvement’, yet many practitioners use a default visual workflow which changes little through the evolution of the product and team. This can become repetitive and ultimately the tool starts to become simple, boring and used for administrative monitoring only. Agile environments often don’t realise the power that visual workflows can have. Whatever Agile methodology you’re using, there are lots of things you can do to adjust your visual workflows in use to increase engagement when working through user stories as a team, and implementing these changes can lead to better conversations, collaboration and team thinking.



This workshop takes the audience through different ways to present the card wall, to make stand-ups more fun and interesting. We will look at ways you can alter the card wall to challenge skill silos and encourage more cross-functional behaviours, and present ideas on how to gamify the card wall in order to make it fun and interactive. Using learnings from the theory of constraints, kanban, scrum, team dynamics and system thinking principles we’ll also discuss creative ways to monitor cycle time, understand progress and visualize flow to challenge team patterns, behaviours and bottlenecks.



The ideas presented are supported by real world examples. The skills mentioned here can be useful when coaching teams in the benefit of cross-functional ways of working, improving team morale and interaction when updating the card wall and encouraging the team to think about the wider impact of the system they’re operating in.



We will discuss :



*Identifying problems in the workflow such as bottlenecks

*Examples and ways to change the traditional grid to improve cross-functional thinking

*Ideas to improve the card flow through cross-functional teams

*Ways to use the card wall as a coaching tool


Speakers
CS

Craig Strong

Dir Product Lifecycle Adoption, Pearson
Craig is a passionate Agile and Lean Practitioner and trainer with a particular focus on continuous improvement cultures and systems thinking. He is a regular presenter within the Agile community, more recently he presented at the Scrum gathering in Barcelona and Agile Tour London on Systems thinking and Theory of Constraints. Craig is also an organiser for the London Agile Practitioners Group (http://www.meetup.com/AgilePractitioners/), which... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Naples

15:45

The 3D Pair Programming Extravaganza (Tim Ottinger, Bryan Beecham)
Limited Capacity seats available

Bryan and Tim will draw from a variety of sources including personal stories, Pair Programming Illuminated, XP materials, slight-of-hand magic, guitar playing, electric parsnips and magic beans to demonstrate, educate, and entertain attendees.



Along the way, attendees will learn why pair-work is successful in many other disciplines, why it is hard to establish in software development, and how to reduce the threats that prevent adoption and experimentation with pair programming. You will leave more aware of, interested in, and capable of teaching and spreading the practice.



At the very least, you will have seen some funny hats and one gratuitous picture of a fuzzy puppy.


Speakers
avatar for Bryan Beecham

Bryan Beecham

Agile Coach and Trainer, Industrial Logic
Bryan is an international speaker, coach, trainer, and agile consultant. His passion is to help improve companies, teams and individuals through continuous improvement and increasing awareness.
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic
Software development as a thinking art | Transitioning to Agile from Whatever | Programming Languages | Microhabits | Refactoring, TDD, Programming, Testing, Managing | Flying drones for fun | NOT POLITICS NOR SPORTS. I'm not qualified.



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 5/6

15:45

Agile Infrastructure Development with Test Kitchen (Fletcher Nichol)
Limited Capacity filling up

Why would we test infrastructure code? Well, you test your application code, right? You wouldn't think of putting a complex website into production without a test harness, would you? We've come a long way with infrastructure as code and are getting closer to better test frameworks and facilities.



[Test Kitchen](http://kitchen.ci/) is an integration tool for developing and testing infrastructure code and software on isolated target platforms. It was originally developed with [Chef](http://www.getchef.com/) in mind, but it is now being used across different configuration management tools.



This talk will focus on how Test Kitchen can help you shorten the feedback cycle during the development of infrastructure code and discover how it plays nice with other existing tools like [ChefSpec](http://code.sethvargo.com/chefspec/), [RSpec Puppet](http://rspec-puppet.com/), [Docker containers](http://www.docker.io/), and [Vagrant](http://www.vagrantup.com/). We will cover getting up and running with Test Kitchen, we will work up a basic greenfield Chef cookbook, and add testing support to a larger real world project. Learn how you can develop infrastructure code using quick iterations and in a Test Driven Development (TDD) cycle. Besides the technology we will look into the benefits of this faster feedback cycle and the current/future state of infrastructure as code testing.

Speakers
avatar for Fletcher Nichol

Fletcher Nichol

CHEF
Fletcher Nichol is a software developer from Edmonton, Canada who has worked in jobs ranging from systems administrator to web application developer. He spends far too much time writing open source software and far too little time playing the drums. He is active in many automation and testing projects such Vagrant and Chef and is the lead developer of Test Kitchen.


Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 4

15:45

Beyond servant leadership to freedom-centered leadership & organizational democracy (Nathan Donaldson)
Limited Capacity full

Around the world organizations are looking for better ways to engage staff grow positive cultures. Agile looks at the team and individual level, but there is often a disconnect at an organizational level. Organizational democracy is a way to move beyond command and control cultures to more successful workplace relationships.



Come to this session if you are looking for new ideas in agile leadership. This session will challenge you to think beyond traditional fear-based control.



Organizational Democracy can help you deliver value to your company, team and customers. Agile provides a solid foundation, but it's only a part of the equation.



At the centre of Organisational Democracy is freedom-centered leadership. Freedom-centered leadership encompasses the ideals of servant leadership, decentralisation and growing leaders at every level.



We'll explore:

- what it means to be a democratic organization

- why there are now certified democratic organizations in 70 countries world-wide

- the benefits and challenges of being democratic

- how it can support Agile organizations.



Many of the 10 principles of Organizational Democracy align closely with the Agile Values and Principles. I will share how embracing the Agile values and principles in my own organisation led us to become a certified democratic organization.


Speakers


Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sarasota

15:45

Modern Leadership Through Environment Design (Matt Barcomb)
Limited Capacity full

Many agile transformations suffer or fail due to insignificant cultural inertia or lackluster leadership support. This should not surprise us.

When we dig deeper, we often find below the surface nothing has changed. We should not expect to transform our organizations if we don't design an ecosystem that allows transformation to grow and thrive.



The future of leadership lies in adaptive environment design (the intentional and continuous creation, modification and removal of organizational structures and practices to yield a more desirable outcome). Drawing from personal experience, I'll describe how leaders must evolve from “managing resources” to “designing systems”. We will explore real-world challenges and insights I've experienced as I continuously adapt the design of my own product development's organizational environment ― from reporting structures and organizational forms to rebalancing authority with accountability as well as revisiting classic issues such as linking performance with compensation plans.



Together we'll build an inter active backlog of topics catered to the audience's highest priorities. You'll hear real-life lessons learned, participate in interactive activities and you will discover new ideas for you to try in your own organization.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Barcomb

Matt Barcomb

VP Org Design Services, LeanDog
Matt (@mattbarcomb) is a product development specialist with a penchant for organization design. He works with companies to turn software development into a core competency by integrating product development activities with business practices. Matt takes a pragmatic, systems approach to improvement, working with stakeholders throughout medium and large organizations. He has experience working with product management and software delivery teams as... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sanibel

15:45

START: A structured model for breakthrough learning, retention, and engagement (Jesse Fewell, Dana Wright)
Limited Capacity full

If you’ve always wanted a better way to conduct your ceremonies, workshops, and trainings, you are not alone. Across the industry teams are exhausted by powerpoint knowledge cramming, confused by feel-good fluff, and losing the message the moment they go back to their desks.



But there is a better way. From TED to World Cafe to Pecha Kucha, there is a revolution in the world of event-based learning. In this hands-on workshop, you will learn how to use the START model, an engagement framework extracted from the un-conference trend. You will see that patterns across all these alternative formats, and get real practice applying them to your own meetings and classes.



Come hear the story, apply the model to your own work, walk away with actionable materials to drive high-outcome events.

Speakers
avatar for Jesse Fewell

Jesse Fewell

Agile Coach & Trainer, JesseFewell.com
Jesse Fewell is a writer, coach, and trainer in the world of management and innovation. From Minneapolis to Malaysia, he's helped startups and conglomerates alike catapult to breakthrough results. His adventures are written down in "Can You Hear Me Now", his handbook for remote teams. A graduate of Johns Hopkins University, he helped bring agile methods to PMPs around the world by co-creating the PMI-ACP agile certification, and co-authoring... Read More →
DW

Dana Wright

Principal, Take Action Inc.
Dana Wright has her Masters in Organization Development and over seventeen years of experience with Take Action Inc., bringing engagement best practices to companies across every industry, including Fortune 500 companies such as Chevron, Disney, HP, Mars Incorporated, Pfizer, and Unilever. She enjoys designing and facilitating meetings, incorporating tools like graphic facilitation, visual storytelling and conversational learning, which allow... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 3

15:45

The Six Trumps®: Meet the DIMWiTS (Doc List, Tricia Broderick)
Limited Capacity seats available

Effective and efficient learning is often a big challenge for teams and organizations consistently facing conflicting and competing priorities. Why did the onboarding training not stick? Why do I feel the need to have to repeat the training? Why do people dread the same old boring meetings? In an agile environment, learning is (*almost*) everything!



In this session, *participants participate*. We eat our own dog food, and utilize Sharon Bowman’s *Training from the BACK of the Room* to facilitate meeting the DIMWiTS, The Six Trumps. Through their management, leadership, coaching, and training experience, we (Tricia and Doc) have learned and applied these techniques at various organizations ranging in size from handfuls to thousands. This is your opportunity to experience how to use them to have a great effect on your team and on your organization’s learning.



And it’ll be FUN!

Speakers
DL

Doc List

VP, Santeon Learning, Santeon Group



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sun C

15:45

Drunk under a Streetlight – A Tale of Enterprise Agile Metrics (Alan Goerner)
Limited Capacity full

I have evidence: 6 very smart, experienced and well-intentioned people can make a complete muck of enterprise agile metrics. Why do metrics at the team level seem so straight-forward, but at the product, program or portfolio levels they are so very … hazardous? The answer, of course, is that the questions being asked are less well-defined, the comparisons treacherous, and the distractions brightly colored. All the usual reasons we humans fall into fallacy. There is, though, a need – a persistent and legitimate need – for visibility broader than a single team and farther than the next sprint. Those of us with agile scruples but enterprise responsibilities are still searching for a solution.



This talk presents an approach to the problem of rolling up agile metrics and answering the questions relevant to managing a product, program or portfolio. It starts with a little manifesto, our moral compass: 8 principles of metrics design and 7 principles of metrics usage. The approach is founded on 3 models and the interactions among them: a value stream model of the application development process, a layered model of management decision-making, and an updated take on an Agile Balanced Scorecard. With these tools, we talk through what to measure, and what not to. Where to measure, and where not to. When and where the questions change. How to aggregate without comparing. And, how to keep it all real. For several clients, it has begun to shine a light out into the darkness where we have come to know that our problems truly lie.

Speakers
AG

Alan Goerner

Vice President, Agile Services & Solutions, UST Global



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Tampa

15:45

The Key to the SAFe: Principles over Practices (Em Campbell-Pretty)
Limited Capacity full

Are you working with multiple agile teams on a single software application? Are you looking for help with making agile work for you at the program level? Have you considered leveraging the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) but been scared off by its prescriptive nature? Are you confused about how program level SAFe applies in your context?



Every organisation is different and what works for one organisation may not work for another. One of the benefits of a framework, is that they can and should be adapted to your context. Based on learnings derived from practical experience, this session will illustrate how focusing on values and principles over practice and processes, can help you design a pragmatic approach to program level SAFe suitable for your unique situation.



By contrasting principles and practises this session will:

* draw out the principles behind SAFe and the standard SAFe practises that apply to them,

* show how practises from other scaling models align to SAFe principles and compliment program level SAFe; and,

* share real word examples of how adapting SAFe practises, while remaining aligned to the principles, can help you create a working model applicable to your program



One example of an adaptation to SAFe that will be covered is SAFe without PSIs.

**Principle:** "Control flow under uncertainty with cadence and synchronisation"

**SAFe Practice:** Use PSI's (4 - 6 iteration cycles) with a 2 day planning event each PSI

**Alternative Practice:** All hands kickoff every Sprint and rolling 4 iteration plan

Speakers
avatar for Em Campbell-Pretty

Em Campbell-Pretty

Partner, Context Matters
Em is a Partner at Context Matters, Australia's leading Enterprise Agile consultancy. After close to 20 years in business management roles within multinational blue chip corporations, Em discovered Agile and became passionate about the chance it provides to align business and IT around the delivery of value. In 2012, she launched Australia’s first Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) Agile Release Train. The story of the cultural transformation that... Read More →



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Tallahassee

15:45

Curing Feature-itis: Using metrics to build the right features to increase engagement (Todd Olson)
Limited Capacity full

For many Agile teams, delivering software is the end of a journey. We ship one feature, have a beer, and move on to the next highest feature on the product backlog.



However, shipping software is simply the beginning. Several studies cite that users on average use less than 30% of the features in a software application, yet our goals and metrics seem more aligned with shipping more features. Agile teams talk more about increasing throughput or reducing cycle time than building features that better engage with their users, so in some ways, Agile has actually accelerated the pace of 'feature-itis.'



This talk introduces practices to shift an organization's focus and process from simply building features quickly to building the right features quickly. We'll discuss how to build and ship features smarter by combining insight with actions to increase feature adoption and better meet customer needs. We'll introduce techniques to collect data -- lots of data -- on user interactions and then distill that data into insights used to better prioritize future backlogs. We'll show how this data can be used to streamline a user's experience in your software and increase the breadth of usage.


Speakers
TO

Todd Olson

CEO, Pendo


Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 1/2

15:45

Intensifying User Stories (Bill Wake)
Limited Capacity seats available

Many software methods focus on *delivery*, but how do they create *delight*?



So many times, the conversation is about splitting stories: finding ways to reduce stories to their core.



But some stories need more: *intensifiers* that make them more sophisticated and more valuable. Intensifiers are a natural tool for follow-on releases; they're also a critical part of Lean Startups' zoom-in pivots, where one corner of a solution becomes the new product.



Intensifying stories is not merely the opposite of splitting stories; it includes things like giving the user more control, providing better options, and adding more intelligence (e.g., a drawing application that infers relationships between objects).



We will start by explaining what intensifiers are and why you should use them. We'll quickly look at the simplest ones: stronger quality attributes and reversed splitting techniques. The heart of the session will be to brainstorm, categorize, and apply creative intensifiers. You'll go home with concrete ideas for intensifying your stories and delighting your customers.

Speakers
avatar for Bill Wake

Bill Wake

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic, Inc.
Bill Wake (www.xp123.com) is a consultant with Industrial Logic, Inc. (http://industriallogic.com). Before that, he was an independent consultant from 2001 to 2007, then spent two years managing software development at Gene Codes Forensics. Bill has worked with teams in a variety of domains, including biotechnology, financial systems, web sales, and more. Hes the co-author of Design Patterns in Java and Refactoring in Ruby.



Monday July 28, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola A

16:30

Scaling Agile: A Tale of Two Transformations (Steve Martin)
Limited Capacity full

Transforming organizations from waterfall to Agile is often a tricky endeavor full of blockers from seemingly all directions. I have seen those that embrace the change reap the rewards, and ultimately yield higher productivity, improve customer relations, have better quality, and increase their morale. Those that execute "Agile in Name Only" get quite frustrated and don't achieve the outcomes originally desired.



In this session, challenges and outcomes from two separate transformation initiatives will be shared. While both organizations are in rather risk-adverse industries (one financial and the other insurance), they invested heavily to introduce and scale Agile across an enterprise. Both wanted to transform their companies so that they could prevent severely dissatisfied customers from walking out the door, improve quality, and have better throughput, enabling them to respond to marketplace demands quicker.



One organization excelled - the other did not.



The approach and outcomes from these two transformations will be compared and contrasted, so that you can learn from direct field experiences techniques that worked and those that didn't. Hopefully, these stories of success and failure can help improve success of introducing and scaling Agile across your enterprise.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Martin

Steve Martin

Sr Program Manager - Methodology & Governance, Pegasystems
With 20+ years’ experience, in Steve’s current role, he helps manage the Agile Methodology Approach for delivering Pegasystems engagements. Steve is a seasoned mentor and facilitator at all levels within companies, from executives to managers to delivery teams. He brings calmness and focus during turbulent transitions, partnering with organizations to reinvent their processes, approaches, and change their culture. Steve has a proven track... Read More →


Monday July 28, 2014 16:30 - 17:00
Daytona

19:00

Ice Breaker Reception
Join us for Agile2014's Opening Night reception. The evening will be filled with food, drink, live entertainment and games! Mix and mingle, chat with new Attendees, reconnect with old friends, and be sure to check out the Sponsor booths to see what's new and exciting in the industry.

Monday July 28, 2014 19:00 - 22:00
Osceola C&D
 
Tuesday, July 29
 

07:30

Registration/Hospitality Desk OPEN
Tuesday July 29, 2014 07:30 - 17:30
Osceola Lobby

08:00

Conference Breakfast
Tuesday July 29, 2014 08:00 - 09:00
Sun Lobby

08:00

Coaches Clinic OPEN
Tuesday July 29, 2014 08:00 - 17:00
Osceola Lobby

08:00

Bookstore OPEN
Tuesday July 29, 2014 08:00 - 18:00
Osceola Lobby

08:30

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss?  Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.  

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment.  We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam daily huddle at 8:30 in the City Hall Lobby to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join! 

Tuesday July 29, 2014 08:30 - 09:00
City Hall Lobby - Open Jam

09:00

Using ATDD to Build Customers That Care (Samuel Hotop, Lav Pathak)
Limited Capacity filling up

In this engaging experience report, we will present 3 different views – Developer, Tester, Business Analyst – into our implementation of Acceptance Test Driven Development in a complex, data-driven domain (natural gas pipelines). Hear how we used ATDD to better engage product owners in the development process, to build a ubiquitous language across the team, to promote faster feedback, and to create a team culture where technologists and product owners alike were deeply invested in the quality of every deliverable and in the system as a whole.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Davidson

Jeffrey Davidson

Principal, Leading Great Teams
Jeffrey Davidson helps teams uncover their greatness. It’s there already, but too often hiding. Using a combination of stories, engagement, and activities, Jeffrey lays the groundwork for lasting change in leaders and teams; building models of execution and cooperation, guiding world-class teams into the #futureofwork.
SH

Samuel Hotop

ThoughtWorks


Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 09:30
Daytona

09:00

Requirements, Product Ownership, and Other Misunderstood Concepts in Agile Development (Jeff Patton)
Limited Capacity full

"Requirement" is a swear word to many in Agile development. In this talk, you'll learn why.



Jeff will describe how an Agile mindset changes a requirements gathering activity into collaborative work focused on understanding and solving problems for business and users. Jeff will explain Agile practices such as backlog building, user stories, and story mapping. You'll learn the flow of user stories from ideas and opportunities all the way through delivery to customers and users. Jeff will describe the difference between a product and project mindset and how to effectively use product discovery practices to understand your customers and users, identify solutions, and test those solutions early to validate that they have value before they're built. You'll leave with a good understanding of how requirements practice is different in Agile development, and the variety of practices and concepts used by Agile teams today.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Patton

Jeff Patton

Chief Troublemaker, Jeff Patton & Associates
Jeff makes use of over 20 years of product design and development experience to help companies create great products.Jeff started in software development in the early 90s as a project leader and senior developer for a small software product company. There he learned that well written code, and fast delivery isnt the secret to success, its just table stakes. Its actually deep understanding of your customers and users coupled with a desire to... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Miami

09:00

Communication Chunking (Laura Powers)
Limited Capacity filling up

Ever talk with a team member - only to get stuck in the weeds or lost in the clouds? There’s more to the magical number 7 (+/- 2) than just the number of people on your team. Whether you’re working on details at the micrometer level – or writing the “mile high” epic user story – chunking your communication can help you foster more effective (and shorter!) meetings, gracefully close detours to rat holes and tangents, and eradicate impediments with fluid negotiations.



In this session, participants will learn and practice communication techniques based on Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) to guide any team conversation with agility. Join me to learn how to use the neurology of communication to super charge your team!


Speakers
avatar for Laura Powers

Laura Powers

Vice President of Business Development, Agile Learning Labs
With 25 years of engineering and management experience, Laura has been involved in the design of aircraft engines, diapers, electric cars, as well as software systems at Hewlett Packard, Sales.com, and eBay. Ironically, the lean concepts practiced eons ago at the start of her career have migrated into the world of software! At Agile Learning Labs, Laura is involved in sales, marketing, training development, and whatever else is needed to... Read More →


Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola 1/2

09:00

Get in Tune with Your Agile SuperPowers! (Jake Calabrese, Stephen Starkey)
Limited Capacity seats available

Are you facing a challenge or problem with another person, a team, or even with yourself? Do you have something blocking you from moving forward and you can’t quite figure it out? Bring some challenges and join us for Agile Superpowers. Learn a simple, yet profound framework you can use to get amazing insights to the challenges you face. You will have a chance to choose a number of superpowers to apply to your challenge(s) from the 7 we introduce you to. Learn what an agile value feels like with Superpowers including deep democracy, courage, curiosity, respect, commitment, playfulness, and collaboration - allowing you to access wisdom not normally available to solve problems!



Agile Superpowers are about attitude and feeling – well beyond just “be curious”. Feeling an agile value is like having a Superpower! There is an essence to it and everyone has a unique feeling that each person just has to experience themselves! Have you had a ‘moment of ah’ or watched people have a moment like that? That is the feeling – the moment where you get goose bumps! Join us as we tap into what it takes for us to be human, be amazing, and be agile!

Speakers
avatar for Jake Calabrese

Jake Calabrese

Agile Systems Coach & Trainer, Agile For All
I love to help people reach those breakthrough moments by noticing and become aware of new information to tackle opportunities and challenges. I'd love to talk about systems coaching, human behavior, lean, scrumban, unscaling, trail running, agile superpowers, systems intelligence, or really whatever seems interesting to you! Please say hello if you see me!
avatar for Stephen Starkey

Stephen Starkey

Agile Development Manager, OpinionLab
Professional Coaching. Agility. Self-organization. Organizational Development. Meditation.


Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Tampa

09:00

What’s wrong with sprint retrospectives and how to fix them (Chris Smith)
Limited Capacity full

Do you often find yourself struck with a sense of déjà vu in the retrospective meeting at the end of a sprint? Do you spend your time arguing about things to START, STOP or CONTINUE every single time? Perhaps you feel like you are just highlighting the same old problems, which never get fixed? Has the team rebelled completely and decided that retrospective meetings are a waste of time?



The drive to inspect and adapt is one of the most important aspects of agile software development. A great way to bake this approach into your process is by having regular retrospective meetings that engage and challenge the team to solve their own problems and make things better. However, these meetings can be difficult to run well and drive improvement. In fact, many teams sleepwalk through sessions, treating them as a box-ticking exercise that signals the end of the iteration.



Maybe it’s time we tried a bit harder to make sprint retrospective meetings work?



In this workshop, Chris and Paul will explain exactly how to put together an awesome sprint retrospective. Attendees will try novel activities that can be used to gather information and challenge team members to consider problems from a new angle. They should leave the session equipped with new techniques to apply at the end of their very next iteration.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Smith

Chris Smith

Project Manager, Red Gate
Chris is a project manager at Red Gate - a purveyor of ingeniously simple software tools and services. His job is to lead agile software development teams; helping them to regularly deliver valuable software for our users, solve their own problems and do the best work of their lives.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola 3

09:00

Tackling legacy code (Robert Kerney, Llewellyn Falco)
Limited Capacity seats available

The system crashes in a portion of the codebase you have never seen. It is Friday night, 4 o'clock pm, and you have to fix it before you can go home. How can you accelerate your understanding of the bug and still get out of the office before 5?



Learn to use two simple techniques to isolate the problem by dividing and conquering code without necessarily understanding it. Once the problem has been isolated you will have a suite of tests that replicate the error, and allows you to simply debug to find the problem. After the problem is found, and you have tests replicating the error, you will have everything you need to fix it.



The best part of this is that you, the audience, will be the ones who will solve our code problem. It will be your understanding that allows the poor hapless programmer to enjoy the rest of the conference.



These techniques are generally language agnostic.

Speakers
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight author.
RK

Robert Kerney

Software Engineer 3, Hunter Industries


Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola 5/6

09:00

Positive Politics (Heather Hassebroek, Kent McDonald)
Limited Capacity full

You have been tapped for an exciting new project. A member of the executive team recognizes that the company needs to transform to meet the evolving needs of your dynamic marketplace. They know that Agile will be part of that transformation, they tap you to lead the effort, and now they think their work is done . While that is exciting and an honor for you, you still need the active engagement of the senior leadership team to create a culture where Agile practices can flourish. The support from the top is critical to drive the type of innovation and flexibility that will be required to successfully implement any new idea – but especially one as (positively) disruptive as Agile.



In this interactive session, Heather and Kent describe how senior leaders need to act differently in an enterprise transitioning to agile, and some helpful patterns individual contributors can use to leverage politics in a positive manner to lead up through influence and help senior leaders make the transition. These patterns are based on Heather and Kent’s experiences at a variety of organizations driving or helping to drive changes including, but not limited to adopting agile approaches. Along the way, we’ll give you a chance to share your thoughts and experiences using politics in a positive (or perhaps not so positive) way to help an enterprise transition to agile.


Speakers
HH

Heather Hassebroek

Lean Agile Program Manager, FBL Financial
Heather Hassebroek is the Lean Agile Program Manager at FBL Financial Group in West Des Moines, IA. Heather has spent over seven years in various capacities focusing on change management, Agile coaching, leadership and project management. In her current role, Heather leads an organizational transformation to Lean and Agile practices, teaches classes on the basics of Agile, coaches teams and speaks about cultural change, leadership and Agile... Read More →
avatar for Kent McDonald

Kent McDonald

Agile Practice Lead, B2T Training
Kent J. McDonald uncovers better ways of delivering value by doing it and helping others do it. His more than 15 years of experience include work in business analysis, strategic planning, project management, and product development in a variety of industries including financial services, health insurance, performance marketing, human services, nonprofit, and automotive. He is active in the business analysis and agile software development... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sarasota

09:00

Fun with feedback (Astrid Claessen, Joost Mulders)
Limited Capacity filling up

I just loved the days when I sat behind my computer screen and only had to “talk” to my keyboard, but with the wider adoption of Agile this is no longer an option. Stand-Up, Planning, Refinement, Review and Retrospective meetings all require an active participation in the conversation.



So how do you improve your communication skills? One of the ways people improve is by receiving feedback and of-course acting on it.



I'd like to introduce the audience to a board game called Rhetoric, which will help you:

− improve your communication skills

− improve your feedback skills



### Effective feedback

When done in the right way and with the right intentions, feedback is the avenue to greatness. People have to know what they are doing well and what could be improved. For them to really hear your thoughts and suggestions on ways to improve, that feedback has to be delivered carefully and frequently.

Giving feedback effectively is a skill. And like all skills, it takes practice to build your confidence and improve. A game space like Rhetoric enables you to practice plenty, it reduces fear by suspending reality and creating an emotionally safe place for exploration.



### Rhetoric the game

Is a simple, engaging and educational board game for four to eight people that will help you improve your communication skills. Rhetoric can help you, or your team, deliver a message in a safe, fun & effective way. It is originally designed to help you improve your public speaking skills, but the techniques learned through playing the game also help when having to get your message across in a work environment. Using the Rhetoric techniques will increase the impact of your message.



We have adapted the original game to focus on giving each other feedback.



Want to learn more about how the original game is being played all over the world? Have a look at their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/rhetoricgame.

Speakers
avatar for Astrid Claessen

Astrid Claessen

Agile Coach, Kuzidi
@ThePO_game | Kuzidi | Agile Holland | Coaching | Reading | Connecting | Traveling | Africa | Cooking | Photographing
JM

Joost Mulders

Kuzidi
Agilist and management innovator. | | Passionate to help people, teams and organizations to re-invent the workplace discovering practices that guide them to a level of continuous improvement and becoming truly agile. | | Implementing agile practices since 2006 and having a strong background in a large diversity of roles within software development as a developer, business analyst, project manager, agile coach, trainer and manager enables me... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sanibel

09:00

Lightning Talks: People
Limited Capacity seats available

Race to the Moon: The Agility of the Giant Leap for Mankind (Jo Hollen)

Powerful Connection with Passionate Listening!!! (Pradeepa Narayanaswamy)

Agile – Principles Over Practice (Dwight Kingdon)

Conjoint Coaching (George Dinwiddie)

Five Fun Agile Metaphors from the movie The Sandlot (Matt Badgley)

Innovation Requires Forgiveness (Olaf Lewitz)

Will my band stay together? (Mark Kilby)

#Agile4Agencies (Hiroshi Hiromoto)

Sustainable Cultural Agile Release For The Enterprise (Matt Heusser)

 

There will also be sign-up for just-in-time lightning talks near Open Jam and 15 minutes before the session starts.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Gainesville

09:00

'Value Innovation' Driven Portfolio Management (Walt Wyckoff, Pat Reed)
Limited Capacity seats available

As the pace of organizational change and complexity accelerates, it’s critical that we find a way to move out of the “Do More with Less” mindset and build our competitive edge at truly doing less to create more time and space for innovation and sustainable value creation. Managing scope continues to remain elusive and most of the work we do fails to deliver the planned benefits or offset the cost and time spent to deliver it.....and sometimes even creating waste (like context switching because of too much WIP, technical debt, burnout, etc.) This workshop focuses on introducing practical tools and techniques to measure benefits realization, accelerate learning, manage scope and reduce waste. We'll also introduce "Value Innovation" concepts for simultaneously focusing on the highest valued customers needs, understanding how customers perceive (and measure) value; and reducing both time and costs to generate optimal value. We'll start with shattering some paradigms that no longer serve us to open our minds to "re-thinking":



“more is better” To: “less is best”

“do more with less” “do less and achieve more”

”increase output” “decrease output and increase outcomes”



Most of this 75 minute will facilitate highly interactive, hands on workshop activities with small groups practicing creating a Value Innovation Driven set of tools that can be applied to improve Portfolio, Program, Project and Scope Management:



1. We kick-off with a brief 15 minute presentation to set context, introduce key concepts and walk through a case study and example of an Enterprise Value Model

2. Round 1: Facilitate a group activity to design an Enterprise Value Model an Value Drivers (15 minutes)

3. Round 2: Facilitate a group activity to focus on discovering the needs of the key customer (introducing 3 tools: Customer Value Canvas, Empathy Maps and "Day in the Life" Canvas (15 minutes)

4. Round 3: Facilitate a group activity to develop a Customer Value Matrix/Scorecard - bridging the Enterprise Value Model (business value) with how the customer perceives value (introducing 4 tools: Value Scorecard, Voice of Customer Measures, Value Dials and how to calculate a normalized Value Index (15 minutes)



The workshop will wrap with 15 minutes of sharing highlights from group work along with their key learnings, Q&A and how participants might start applying these tools and techniques in their environments. We will capture questions and facilitate an Open Jam session the following day to address unanswered questions and deepen the learning.



This workshop will provide foundational concepts and practical tools and techniques to apply immediately in your enterprise to measure and manage an optimum flow of value and make value informed portfolio, program and project level decisions - which will be especially value for anyone considering Enterprise Agile.


Speakers
avatar for Pat Reed

Pat Reed

Consultant, iHoriz
Experienced enterprise agile coach and consultant adjunct professor at UC Berkeley Agile Management Program Director on the Agile Alliance Community Leader and co-founder of PMI's Agile Community of Practice experienced Agile Executive for more than 25 years at The Walt Disney Company, Walt Disney Pictures and Television, NBC and Universal Studios, GE and Gap, Inc. 35 years teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels
WW

Walt Wyckoff

Consultant, iHoriz Inc.
Agile practitioner and educator. I like to sail, am working on additional solar PV power for my house, will be one of the first owners of a Tesla Model S. I am also a scale modeler.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola B

09:00

Agile is Risk Management — Dump the Process and Embrace the Principles (Ken Rubin)
Limited Capacity seats available

The existence of a heavyweight risk management process is a good indicator that a company has failed to embrace the essence of what agile is. But software development is risky. You’re creating something new, with an uncertain set of requirements, in an often tight timeframe. And don’t get me started on unknown dependencies, sudden market changes, and personnel shifts! You know that without some sort of risk mitigation strategy, your bright and shiny new project can tarnish quickly, along with your reputation. So, if you don’t have a formal risk management process, what do you do? After all, agile frameworks like Scrum and Kanban don’t explicitly mention risk at all. The solution is a matter of principle--agile principles that is.



In this presentation, I discuss the most effective ways to address process, product, and customer uncertainties during agile product development. I explain how doing good agile, based on solid agile principles, can prevent risks, without having to resort to a complex process to deal with risks that we easily could have avoided. I discuss and provide specific examples of how proper application of agile is inherently risk adverse. I also demonstrate types of uncertainty that agile principles cannot eliminate. For these instances, I present lightweight techniques we can employ as a core part of our agile process, as opposed to some special, outside-the-normal-flow process.

Speakers

Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola A

09:00

How to improve Flow Efficiency, remove the red bricks (Håkan Forss)
Limited Capacity seats available

Do you want to improve end-to-end feature lead-time? It is not a question of working harder. It is a question of first removing the feature wait time, the red bricks.



If you would build an end-to-end timeline for your features using red, yellow and green LEGO bricks. Where:

* Red = Non value adding waiting time

* Yellow = Non value adding activates required due to how work is organized

* Green = Value adding activities of real customer value



How would your feature end-to-end timeline look like? In most cases, you will have less than 20% green and yellow bricks and more the 80% red bricks.



In this session, you will be see how flow efficiency can be drastically improve in two concrete examples from two different domains.



First, you will see how a Swedish Breast Cancer Clinic drastically improved flow efficiency and reduced patient wait time by focusing on removing the red and yellow bricks.



In the second example, you will see how a Product Development Test Organization reduced lead-time and created time for improvements by focusing on improving flow efficiency.



We will take a close look at the three laws that define the performance of all processes:

* Little’s Law

* Law of bottlenecks

* Law of variation



By understanding how the three laws governs the performance of your processes, we can look at ways to improve your flow efficiency.



**When time is gone, it is gone. Time to start removing the red and yellow bricks**


Speakers
avatar for Håkan Forss

Håkan Forss

Lean/Agile Coach, Avega Group
Håkan Forss is a Lean/Agile Coach, public speaker and author. He coaches, mentors and teaches Lean/Agile thinking, methods and tools to organizations, teams and individuals. He develops people’s ability to continuous learn and improve how work is done. Håkan is an active member of the Kanban, Lean and Agile communities. He is an Accredited Kanban Trainer (AKT), a Kanban Coaching Professional (KCP) and he serves in the Kanban Coaching... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Tallahassee

09:00

Vision & Visibility: Structures and Strategies for Applying Agile at Scale (Ronica Roth)
Limited Capacity seats available

Scaling Agile means that we apply its principles to large, even very large, groups of people. When we do this, we allow those people to be more connected to their work and its impact, despite being part of a huge system. The result is better software, better business outcomes. But how do you do it?



**Structure**, like the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), provides an excellent starting place for building an Agile organization. But how do you begin to implement that structure in your organization? We will bring in real-life examples of how companies have found their value streams and restructured around feature teams to improve results. Through a worksheet, we will begin to guide you through beginning to rethink your organization's structure.



**Vision**, supplemented with structure, can harness those talented people toward meaningful goals and the right outcomes. Agile at scale requires a strong product vision--even in an IT environment--and the leadership to keep everyone aligned. We’ll share Rally’s own internal visioning and annual planning process to help you imagine a new way to lead.



**Visibility** from information radiators allow Agile teams to execute effectively at scale and aide decentralized decision-making that maps to a strategic vision. We will present information radiators that provide that visibility, and help you think about what data you need in order to deliver great work, at scale.

Speakers
avatar for Ronica Roth

Ronica Roth

Chief Product Owner, Services, Rally Software
Ronica evangelizes all things collaborative, creative, Agile and Lean with incomparable energy and passion. Her current mission, as Chief Product Owner for Services, is to equip Rally to build learning organizations that honor the individual, give everyone the chance to do what they do best, and harness the power of teams to amplify great work and produce great stuff (including software). She also pursues Colorado’s outdoors, skiing... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sun C

09:00

Don't you trust me? (a technical approach to building trust and consensus) (Seb Rose)
Limited Capacity seats available

In many organisations there is mistrust between team members, which has grown out of



* business stakeholders being unable to validate assumptions of the development team until after implementation

* developers delivering buggy/incorrect code despite writing unit tests

* testers writing large, manual test suites that take a long time to run



Behaviour Driven Development (BDD) is a technique that can improve communication between the technical and non-technical participants on a project. In this session you will not simply be told what BDD is, but you will discover how BDD can help (re)build trust between developers, testers and the business and so deliver greater value to your customers.



You will learn why teams start by writing lots of end-2-end scenarios - a Testing Pyramid anti-pattern known as the "Ice Cream Cone". When this causes problems, it is often recommended that some scenarios get pushed 'down' into the unit test suite. The trouble with this is that even if the business folk and the testers trusted the developer's unit tests implicitly (which they often don't ;-) there's still the issue of visibility. We no longer have one complete, generally consumable, source living documentation.



You will learn how to use Cucumber's tagged hooks to control the amount of application stack that a scenario exercises. This lets you tailor your execution context depending on the runtime of the feature suite and the amount of trust the team has to spare. In the limit, this allows you (where it makes sense) to expose some of your unit tests as scenarios - keeping your living documentation complete.


Speakers
SR

Seb Rose

Claysnow
Seb Rose is an independent software developer, trainer and coach based in the UK. He specialises in working with teams adopting and refining their agile practices, with a particular focus on delivering software through the use of examples. | | He first worked as a programmer in 1980 writing applications for estate agents and solicitors in compiled BASIC on an Apple II. He has worked with many mainstream technologies since then, for many... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sun D

09:00

Exploratory Testing - For Testers, Developers, and you! (Markus Gärtner)
Limited Capacity filling up

Exploratory testing is a style of testing that helps team members to use their personal freedom and accountability to the team to reduce business risks. Exploratory testing is an approach that combines test design, test execution, and test related learning in parallel. Therefore exploratory testing is an empirical approach to reduce risks in the software that were not foreseen so far, and combines well with empirical approaches to software development like Scrum. Since exploratory testing addresses the risks of the unknown unknowns, the things that we don't know that we don't know them, it also combines well with automated software tests.



Session-based exploratory testing has become widespread as an approach. In this lecture Markus will describe the key takeaways from his classes on exploratory testing:

* session-based test management

* charters

* debriefings

* notetaking using pen and paper or mindmaps.



For programmers, testers, and product owners this session provides the basics of exploratory testing. Most folks think about exploratory testing as unstructured, cowboy-testing. There exists a lot of structure you can apply to exploratory testing that closes crucial feedback loops. This usually kicks people out of their comfort zone of "we need to work with test plans", and "exploratory cannot work here". I will also talk about various tools that can help you deliver more value with exploratory testing, and thereby help you think out of your comfort zone.

Speakers
avatar for Markus Gärtner

Markus Gärtner

it-agile GmbH
Markus Gärtner works as a testing programmer, trainer, coach, and consultant with it-agile GmbH, Hamburg, Germany. Markus, author of ATDD by Example - A Practical Guide to Acceptance Test-Driven Development, a student of the work of Jerry Weinberg, founded the German Agile Testing and Exploratory workshop in 2011. He is a black-belt instructor in the Miagi-Do school of Software Testing and contributes to the Softwerkskammer, the Germany Software... Read More →


Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola 4

09:00

It's a Bit Like Dating (Bradley Powell)
Limited Capacity seats available

When there is an existing relationship between an Agile service provider and their customer, a level of trust exists. The customer trusts that the provider will deliver. The provider trusts that the customer will be a good product owner. There is an openness that can only come with working together. It’s sort of like being married.



But what about providers and their customers/prospects that have no established relationship? Will the customer trust the provider to deliver on time and on budget? And what if the customer is not accustomed to using Agile? Will they trust you if you don’t have a detailed project plan extending for 12 months with an accompanying Gantt chart? Beginning any new customer/vendor relationship can be daunting. Add unfamiliarity with Agile into the mix and it may seem like a giant leap of faith.



So the big question is, how do you get to a state of trust and openness? How do you get to that married-like state?



The answer: you date first.



This session will cover concepts and teach you how to 'date' in your new Agile relationship. Specific topics covered in this session are:



• Taking the Long Term View

• Establishing Initial Match

• Educating on Value vs. Scope

• Putting Your Best Foot Forward

• Getting to Know You

• Sometimes It Helps to Have a Chaperone

• Delivering Value Early



As we cover each topic, we will integrate the story of a successful match between a supplier of bespoke software and their client: a financial services firm. We will focus especially on insights and recommendations from our experience of establishing an initial trust and working relationship. The lessons of this session are applicable to customer/external supplier relationships, and are equally applicable to customer/internal supplier relationships that exist in larger organizations.

Speakers
BP

Brad Powell

President/CEO, Axiaware
Brad is responsible for the overall vision, strategy, and operations of Axiawaresm. He has over twenty years experience in technology, including sixteen years in software development and fourteen years in management. Brad has a diverse background that includes business, technology and leadership in the financial services industry. He's a former Economic and Financial Analyst for Arthur Andersen LLP. His responsibilities included technology... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Naples

09:45

Origins of Teams: Darwinian Observations in the Wild (Blake Nyquist, Wade Wachs)
Limited Capacity full

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.”



Although widely attributed to him, Charles Darwin never actually made the above statement. However, Darwin still presents us with some interesting concepts we can use in reflecting on our own experiences.



This experience report covers the ongoing, 14-year evolution of an engineering team at a web hosting company that powers a sizable portion of the Internet. It starts with the very first developer climbing out of the “primordial ooze” of a burgeoning company. The timeline progresses to the modern era and the behaviors of a full research and development team discovering and experimenting with Agile methods to provide greater customer satisfaction within a nearly 500-person organization.



In addition to observations and insights from individual team members, the presenters will share their experiences acting as coaches, trainers, and facilitators, managing teams and upwards in their organization. The goal is to provide a level of review not often seen by the Agile community. There are countless words and presentations devoted to transitioning between individual stages in the process, but this will be a full review, spanning several years of history. This report will appeal to a broad range of individuals, as it will cover growth patterns for a team of one to large, geographically dispersed teams.

Speakers
BN

Blake Nyquist

Agile Program Manager, Liquid Web, Inc.
WW

Wade Wachs

QA Manager, LiquidWeb
I'm a tester, test manager, and autodidact.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 09:45 - 10:15
Daytona

10:15

Conference AM Break
Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:15 - 10:45
Sun Lobby/Osceola Lobby

10:45

Converting A Successful FBI Program From Waterfall To Agile (Craeg Strong)
Limited Capacity full

Converting a successful, ongoing project with 2M lines of code to agile presents unique challenges that are not covered in most books and courses on agile; this talk describes successful strategies used on the FBI CODIS project. This is an up-to-the-minute account of our (continuing) experiences instituting agile practices, paying down technical debt, and addressing the concerns of skeptical governance and oversight groups.

We have heard the reports of unsuccessful programs "rebooted" and rescued through the use of agile software development models. And there is a wealth of information available on how to institute agile practices such as test automation and refactoring into Greenfield projects. But what about a highly successful, longstanding, waterfall-based government program with over 2 million lines of code and 15 years of history? How do you institute DevOps practices on a project that uses 100% Microsoft platforms? How do you write automate tests and refactor mercilessly on a project where the majority of the business logic is written in SQL? How do you deliver valuable software when the oversight framework requires you to maintain over 50 separate documents? How can we institute Scrum while simultaneously undergoing CMMI level 3 certification?

This experience report describes specific practices that we adopted during our two year (and counting) experience transforming the FBI CODIS project to Agile. Many topics will be discussed including sprint length, “technical” sprints, technical user stories, story point budgeting, paying down technical debt, instituting agile practices such as pair programming, responding to unexpected events, and others. Each practice will be analyzed in terms of the cost versus benefits and when and how it may be most beneficial. This talk attempts to provide context and insight into when and how specific approaches might provide the most benefit for legacy modernization projects or projects answering to skeptical oversight groups.

Experience Report Paper is available from the Agile Alliance site

Speakers
avatar for Craeg  Strong

Craeg Strong

CTO, Savant Financial Technologies, Inc. d/b/a Ariel Partners
Craeg Strong has 25 years of experience in information technology, starting at Project Athena during his undergraduate studies at MIT. Mr. Strong is an experienced "turn-around" artist, and has successfully instituted agile practices on some of the largest and most complex commercial and government software development projects. He is a Certified Scrum Master and a contributor to the Apache Ant open source automated build tool. He is currently... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 11:15
Daytona

10:45

Agile Projects, Programs, and Portfolio Management: No Air Quotes Needed (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity full

Have you ever seen people use air quotes around the words “agile project” as if they don’t believe those words go together? Or, do you wonder what the five horizons of planning are? Do you ever wonder if agile or lean approaches to project management can be scaled or if you are doomed to waterfall approaches to large efforts?



You can use agile and lean approaches to your projects, program, and the project portfolio. Agile and lean projects are still projects. In this session, Johanna Rothman will discuss why you would want to use short cycles, how iterative and incremental development works, and how you pick an iteration length.



We’ll discuss the five different planning horizons, and briefly discuss the basics of user stories and estimation. Yes, we’ll have a brief and lively discussion prediction and estimation and when to use each. You’ll have a chance to see what team boards might look like in Scrum or Kanban, and what information radiators might show you in a healthy or a not-so-healthy project.



We’ll also talk about how you can expand from one team to a program and where the different schools of thought lie, and how to avoid multi-tasking with agile project portfolio management.


Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. | | Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. She is the current agileconnection.com technical editor. Johanna is the author of several books including: Agile and Lean Program Management: Scaling Collaboration Across the Organization... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Miami

10:45

Team Peace of Mind: Harness the Power of Flow. (Rob Keefer)
Limited Capacity full

We are ‘makers’. We like to get things done. The more productive we are, the happier we are. This connection between productivity and happiness has been researched in the field of positive psychology as flow: the theory that people are happiest when they are in a state of absorption with an activity, or in the zone (credit: M. Csiksgentmihalyi). Practices such as Personal Kanban, the Pomodoro technique, TDD, assertive programming, source control, continuous integration, and more, promote both individual and team flow, which in turn increases the peace of mind in their deliverables. In this highly interactive session, participants will experience first-hand (via LEGO) how these practices contribute to flow. Though some of these practices are developer-centric, the whole team (Project Managers, Testers, UX Designers, etc.) will discover how individual disciplines contribute to team peace of mind.

Speakers
avatar for Rob Keefer

Rob Keefer

Innovation Director, POMIET
Rob Keefer, PhD, is Co-founder and Innovation Director of POMIET, a healthcare systems consulting company. He has 20+ years of experience delivering innovative software solutions along with 12+ years leading Agile teams and implementing approaches for better human/computer interaction. Rob specializes in turning complex HealthIT problems, into opportunities for measurable progress, improved deliverables, and faster time-to-market. Along the... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sarasota

10:45

Building Software Craftsmen (Steve Ropa)
Limited Capacity seats available

There has been a lot of talk lately about Software Craftsmanship. Most of this talk has been centered around how to take existing, skilled programmers and turn them into Craftsmen. What about those who are just entering the field? In this talk, we will explore a new approach to fulfilling the entire journey from Apprentice to Master, both from a personal and organizational level. We will also look at how to get such a program started, and how to bring the existing team along.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Ropa

Steve Ropa

Agile Consultant, VersionOne
Steve has 26+ years of experience in software development and 16 years’ experience working with agile methods. Steve is passionate about bridging the gap between the business and technology and nurturing the change in the nature of development. He has currently been focusing many of his efforts around creating a culture of Craftsmanship in the entire development shop. As an Agile Coach, Steve has supported clients across multiple industry... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 5/6

10:45

Built in or Bolted On? Building Secure Systems with an Agile Team (Judy Neher)
Limited Capacity seats available

The security of a system or application is the team's responsibility...not just the security professional assigned to the project. How does an agile team address the security of our system or application as a collaborative unit?



Through the lens of Scrum team members, we will examine the roles and responsibilities of individual team members to enable producing a secure product.



Developers, testers and systems engineers all have specific obligations regarding the security of their product, but must bring those to bear in a collaborative fashion. We will take each of these roles individually and focus on how their individual skillsets coalesce together to build a secure system.




Speakers
avatar for Judy Neher

Judy Neher

President/CEO, Celerity Technical Services, Inc.
Passionate about building highly collaborative, high performing teams.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sun D

10:45

Managing Technical Debt (Fadi Stephan)
Limited Capacity full

Is your team constantly missing delivery dates? Is the velocity decreasing from sprint to sprint while the development costs are rising? Are customers complaining about the increasing number of bugs and the long time it takes to add new features? These are all signs that you are mired in technical debt and probably on your way to bankruptcy or a complete system rewrite. Technical debt is inevitable, whether intentional or unintentional. However, not managing technical debt can paralyze your organization. Come learn how to measure the quality of your code base and determine the amount of your debt. Learn how to engage executives and get buy-in on a technical debt repayment plan that enables you to pay down your debt, refinance it to a low interest rate, increase the quality of your code and return to high productivity.

Speakers
avatar for Fadi Stephan

Fadi Stephan

Consultant, Excella
Fadi Stephan is a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Agile coach, and consultant with Washington DC-based Excella Consulting. Fadi has more than fifteen years of professional experience as a product manager, project manager, software developer, ScrumMaster and consultant at both Federal Agencies and businesses ranging from start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. Since 2006, his focus has been on building high performing organizations and teams that focus... Read More →


Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 3

10:45

Metrics Driven Development and DevOps (Ernest Mueller, Karthik Gaekwad)
Limited Capacity full

There are many facets of devops, and we will spend our time in this presentation focusing on collecting and using metrics (business, application, system, etc.) and building a metrics driven culture in organizations.



We will define how we have seen devops progress in our organizations and how we’ve realized that different teams in our organizations can find common ground when teams (who have different roles) can work well together when they use metrics as the common language.



Karthik will talk about how we are using the principles from the Lean Startup to define our development cycles, sprints and using metrics to quantify how successful the products we are trying to come out with in R&D. Initially we started practicing devops on the dev and ops side of the house but realized this was still a black box to the business side of the house, so we pivoted to what our business actually understood, and that was metrics; today, we focus more on metrics (business and system level), and can fail or succeed fast to achieve our business goals faster than before.



Ernest will go into detail on how a large, mature SaaS organization uses metrics in conjunction with distributed agile development and DevOps to guide their development at scale. How much a product is used, how much each feature is used, and how much value each user gets out of it are key drivers for a business strategy - and it’s all information that’s emitted by a system. He'll show how Bazaarvoice has invested in collecting and using these metrics to guide their decisions and influence their culture.



Talk Breakdown (75 minutes):

(Actual talk time~ 65 minutes)

10 minutes Intro and how we define devops and a

20 minutes on how metrics can help your devops teams

15 minutes on how startup teams can use metrics to develop “the right” code

20 minutes on how Bazaarvoice does metrics


Speakers
avatar for Karthik Gaekwad

Karthik Gaekwad

Senior Engineer, StackEngine
I'm an experienced software engineer with a passion to quickly design and develop cloud hosted, web software products. I enjoy writing API's and user interfaces. I live in Austin, Texas and I'm an organizer for Devopsdays Austin, Container Days, and CloudAustin.
avatar for Ernest Mueller

Ernest Mueller

Lean Systems Manager, AlienVault
Ernest Mueller is a 20-year IT veteran who has led a variety of teams designing, building and operating SaaS and Web  products for companies large and small. Frequently, that has involved innovating Agile, DevOps, and cloud transformations to meet the needs of the modern marketplace. He writes about these topics at theagileadmin.com. Ernest is also active in advocating for the Austin technologist community, and organizes events like... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Naples

10:45

An Executive Overview of SAFe (Al Shalloway)
Limited Capacity seats available

With almost a decade's experience of talking to executives about Agile, I have learned what motivates Agile enthusiasts does not motivate executives. Executives want maximum delivery in the shortest amount of time. Agile should be about incremental business delivery, not team iterations. This talk presents the Scaled Agile Framework from an executive's point of view. However, it will interest directors and line managers as well both to enable them to better speak to their stakeholders and to understand how to deliver value quickly.



The first half is not SAFe specific but discusses the challenge of Agile at scale. It explains why our current hierarchical management system does not lend itself to our true goal of delivering business value quickly. It then presents the concept of the value stream and why removing delays in our workflow and for feedback are so essential. It then describes why starting at the team level is fraught with danger, even though it will usually start with success.



After this background, the talk goes into SAFe itself, starting by presenting the house of Lean on which SAFe is built. It then discusses the portfolio, program and team layers of SAFe and how the SAFe framework can create a context for successful Scrum teams to be successful at creating bottom-line value across the enterprise.


Speakers


Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola A

10:45

The Mental Leaps at Ericsson 3G (Erik Schön, Håkan Forss)
Limited Capacity seats available

Sharing our journey of making Agile and Lean work at scale at the Ericsson (*) 3G product development unit. The Ericsson 3G product development unit consists of around 1800 people in >100 cross-functional and co-located teams in ~10 sites in northern Europe and China.



In this session, we will share how we made three very important mental leaps to make the transition to Agile and Lean stick.



# Leap #1 Methods & Tools to Principles & Mindset

Tools and methods can work in some context and not in others. If you have your own principles and mindset, then you can adapt or create your own methods and tools that fit your context. When realizing this, we made a mental leap from a focus on methods and tools to a focus on principles and mindset.



# Leap #2 Resource Efficiency to Flow Efficiency

With a need reduce both costs and time to market, we were looking for alternatives to “resource efficiency” focus (keeping people and equipment fully utilized at all times). We realized that our ability to innovate around state-of-the art algorithms for optimizing packet data flow in mobile radio networks is also applicable for our product development processes. We made a mental leap from “resource efficiency” to “flow efficiency”, ie a focus on keeping work items moving through the process without waiting times.



# Leap #3 Scattered Experiences to Continuous Innovation

We were solving problems as they occurred using task forces in fire-fighting mode, lacking corporate memory and a common direction. By creating a shared direction and a common purpose around the need to improve, we made the leap from scattered experiences to a culture of continuous innovation.



We this session be about sharing and learning. We will share our journey at Ericsson 3G. We want you to learn as much as possible. It is therefore our intension to make this a highly interactive session with quite a bit of room for questions and answers.



(*)Ericsson is a world-leading provider of communications technology and services. Today 40 percent of the world's mobile traffic goes through Ericsson networks and we support customers' networks servicing more than 2.5 billion subscriptions. We are more than 114,000 people working with customers in more than 180 countries. In 2013, the company's net sales were USD 34.9 billion. Our vision is to be the prime driver in an all-communicating world.


Speakers
avatar for Håkan Forss

Håkan Forss

Lean/Agile Coach, Avega Group
Håkan Forss is a Lean/Agile Coach, public speaker and author. He coaches, mentors and teaches Lean/Agile thinking, methods and tools to organizations, teams and individuals. He develops people’s ability to continuous learn and improve how work is done. Håkan is an active member of the Kanban, Lean and Agile communities. He is an Accredited Kanban Trainer (AKT), a Kanban Coaching Professional (KCP) and he serves in the Kanban Coaching... Read More →
avatar for Erik Schön

Erik Schön

Head of Requirements Area Mobile Broadband + Radio Access Network Operations & Maintenance, and, Test Consultancy, Ericsson
Hacker turned software researcher turned system engineer; manager turned leader turned navigator, Erik Schön has developed people, products and organizations for almost 20 years in complex, global R&D environments. Currently, Erik is one of the leaders of a large-scale journey towards perfect flow using Lean/Agile principles and practices in a 1500+ people product development unit at Ericsson.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola B

10:45

Challenge Your System View--Avoiding Bias Traps in Agile and Intrapreneurial Practices (Jean Tabaka)
Limited Capacity full

You’ve been adopting Agile and want to scale. Perhaps you want to create an intrapreneurial practice in your organization. But as you scale Agile, you want to maintain or improve your speed. In fact you want and need to go faster. Merely being the incumbent while adopting Agile is death; it’s a winner-takes-all market. If you aren’t innovating quickly, you’re in danger of being eaten by those innovating faster than you. But going faster can be troublesome: you may be decreasing your thinking discipline either consciously or subconsciously. And that can lead to more opportunities to fall prey to cognitive traps such as biases and fallacies. The more biased you are, the more distorted your system view becomes.



Fortunately, as you continue to scale Agile and speed up your innovation, you have a variety of tools of discipline to prop up your thinking. In this talk, Jean brings her perspectives on how to apply intentionally slower thinking in order to reduce the distortion in how we innovate. With work by Daniel Kahneman in his book, “Thinking, Fast and Slow”, Jean shares perspectives on how Kahneman’s work can help us address our reluctance to admit to complexity as well as the distortion in how we perceive ourselves.



Fundamentally, how much distortion do you have in your system view, and what can you do to reduce it? For example, has hindsight bias diminished your ability to learn? Are you prone to traps of anchoring and priming as you set your estimates and evaluate your WIP? Failure to address your cognitive fallacies in these and other areas increase the risk in your ability to deliver.



The good news: You can apply a number of tools to surface, avoid, and even prevent these lures of distortion. Applying design thinking, lean startup practices, empathy work, A3 technology and other tools, you can be a disciplined explorer. You can think and act fast with Agile while also bringing in the rigor of slower thinking. And, you can reduce the distortion in your system view, reduce risk, and create your new market while maintaining health in your perspective.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Tabaka

Jean Tabaka

Agile Fellow, CA
Hey all! I'm excited to be joining everyone here. I continue to be passionate about the ways that we can apply Agile principles and values to extend humaneness in how we work. Being able to bring my passion into my 13,000 person organization is exciting and daunting. But when you work with amazing people who want to do the right thing, why wouldn't you want to give it your best? My good ol' conviction in the power of facilitation and... Read More →


Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 4

10:45

#NoEstimates - Applied, In Depth, and By Experience (Matthew Heusser, David Hoppe)
Limited Capacity full

It's been six years since Arlo Belshee started talking about "Naked Planning", which viewed estimates as form of waste, and three years since Woody Zuill introduced the idea of #NoEstimates. In that time a few people have been quietly working away in organizations to reduce or eliminate time spent by technical staff making estimates. We’ll bring a few of the leading thinkers and doers in this space together with you to discuss how those experiments turned out, to help conference attendees uncover where #NoEstimates might already be happening in their own organization, and what to do about it.



After all, the one thing we know about estimates, the human task of figuring out how long things will take based on experience and judgement, is that it is time that could have been spent making software.



If this this session can help you understand where #NoEstimates might make sense in your organization, and give you some ideas for experiments to run back home, without putting you to sleep -- well, we'd like to consider that success.



Oh, and we'll throw in a free meeting facilitation technique you might enjoy.



About the featured speakers: Troy Tuttle is a consultant who has worked with #NoEstimats in the enterprise, Troy Magennis has patented a predictive model that eliminates estimates from the technical, engineering work. Markus Gaertner has used a systems-based, instead of goal-based approach at a small consulting company, while David Hoppe has used #NoEstimates at a Startup.



But forget all that; we’ll be pulling experiences and ideas from the whole wrong. Don't just come with questions - we ask you to help contribute!



Oh, and there will be cookies.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Heusser

Matthew Heusser

Principal Consultant, Excelon Development
Matt has deep experience in software testing, project management, development, writing, and systems improvement. His extensive network of contacts in these fields has enabled him to put together a diversified, high-level team of experts at Excelon. | | In 2006, Matt was lead organizer for the initial Great Lakes Software Excellence Conference, a regional event that continues today. He organized the Agile-Alliance Sponsored Workshop on the... Read More →
DH

David Hoppe

Technical Problem Solver, Excelon Development
David Hoppe has been developing software for nearly two decades constantly seeking to improve the craft personally and with people around him. David is the Chief Technical Problem Solver at Excelon Development, a boutique consulting firm based in West Michigan. David recently wrapped up a web performance engineering project for an Excelon client to rave reviews and is excited to share some lessons learned.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Tallahassee

10:45

Make Your Product Come Alive with the Business Model Canvas (Jorgen Hesselberg)
Limited Capacity filling up

Alex Osterwalder's Business Model Canvas is an incredibly light-weight and effective way to quickly visualize and explain all the pieces that need to come together in order for a product to create value for your organization. In this interactive workshop, we'll help you take advantage of this technique to more effectively align your team around a common purpose, test the assumptions that underlie the model and be able to clearly articulate to your leadership what it is that makes your product successful. Targeted toward people passionate about creating organizational value, this interactive workshop will give you a fresh perspective of your product and assist you in communicating value to a larger organizational audience.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sanibel

10:45

WIP: A tragedy in 278 parts (Eric Willeke)
Limited Capacity filling up

The nature of the modern world pushes to us to do more, faster. This unrelenting pressure puts the people and teams that DO the work in a wonderful situation where they can indeed make everybody happy... if only they could do one. more. thing. Two clear choices emerge: start everything, or finish something.



This talk introduces three concepts critical to anybody who performs work: an understanding of flow and process efficiency, recognition of the tragedy of WIP, and insight to the cost of commitment. Each topic includes specific, immediately applicable advice on how to improve your throughput and reduce the stress associated with doing your work.



Anybody who governs or manages teams who do work will benefit from the simple guidance. You can quickly apply and use several simple exercises that show the impact of WIP and over-commitment.



After exploring the three key areas, we'll see if we have time for the other 275.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Willeke

Eric Willeke

Advisor: Enterprise Agility, CA Technologies
Eric Willeke is an experienced transformation consultant with deep Agile expertise and an extensive history of working with enterprise customers. Eric guides CA|Rally’s largest customers through their complex Agile adoption and transformation efforts, helping them build capability to sustainably and successfully deliver on the needs of their business. For more than a decade, his personal vision statement, “Helping everybody on a project sleep... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Tampa

10:45

State of Agile (Ken Schwaber)
Limited Capacity full

I do not know what the state of agile is. I do not know if it is better than waterfall. I think it is, it certainly feels better, all of the surveys say that it is better. However, when a customer asks me how they are doing, I’m stumped. All I have is circumstantial evidence, not proof. I asked them to get ALM tools. I encouraged test first development. But has the organization received more value in return? Neither they nor I know.



I’ll describe a practice derived from medicine, Evidence Based Management, in which we can evaluate our improvement efforts based on indisputable outcomes that measure organizational value. We’ll look at how we can relate these outcomes to circumstantial evidence of development capability. Whatever, we can move from software being seen as an expense.

Speakers
KS

Ken Schwaber

Evangilist, Scrum.org
Developed Scrum with Jeff Sutherland in early 1990's and presented it at Oopsla 1995. Created and signed Agile Manifesto in 2001 with others at SnowBird. Founded Agile Alliance, Scrum Alliance, and Scrum.org, in succession.


Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Gainesville

10:45

The Effective Design Critique (Jabe Bloom)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile and LeanUX asks teams to work collaboratively across disciplines. One of the key skills for working with designers and UX practitioners is effective critique. Unfortunately most non-designers (developers, managers etc) don't have the rich experience of having been critiqued and critiquing others. Designers learn these skills by actively engaging in the process for years.



This workshop is designed to teach developers and arm UX practitioners with the tools, models and methods to quickly teach their teams how to effectively engage in a design critique.



Effective critiques leave teams feeling energized and eager to explore new options. Come learn how to help designers see the potential in the mix of your and their ideas.


Speakers
avatar for Jabe Bloom

Jabe Bloom

President & Principle Consultant, Coherent Insight
I try to collect and tell interesting stories about the future. | | Sometimes, when the stories are are compelling enough, people use them to make interesting things. | | I am an award-winning international speaker on Lean Software and Product Development, Agile, and Lean Management. | | President and Principal Consultant at Coherent Insight, Chief Flow Officer at Praxis Flow | | Pursuing a PhD at Carnegie Mellon.


Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 1/2

10:45

Get The Liars in the Same Room - Establishing a Consistent Understanding of Priority (Kupe Kupersmith, Kent McDonald)
Limited Capacity seats available

The role of Product Owner is very difficult, especially when they have to satisfy varying and potentially conflicting needs of a diverse group of stakeholders. Often stakeholders have different communication styles, interaction styles and varying levels of project support ranging from champion to saboteur. This task becomes even more difficult when the person filling the Product Owner role is in a position where they can arbitrarily make decisions about what features get developed next without the support of those stakeholders.



In this interactive session Kupe and Kent describe two techniques to aid the collaboration with a wide variety of stakeholders to reach a single direction for the delivery team that the stakeholders will support. These techniques include determining and using Decision Filters to focus in on the appropriate features to deliver; and an an improvisation technique “Yes, and...” that keeps conversations with smart, experienced, strong willed, and sometime opinionated stakeholders positive and effective.



Come to "Get the Liars in the Same Room" so that you can immediately try these techniques and see if they can help you develop support among your stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Kupe Kupersmith

Kupe Kupersmith

President, B2T Training
Kupe Kupersmith, President, B2T Training, possesses over 15 years of experience of practicing business analysis in various industries. If that’s not enough, he is also an experienced improvisational comedian. With this combined experience he has been helping teams become high performing teams by focusing on applying improvisation skills to improve communication and collaboration. As the president of B2T Training, Kupe uses his these skills to... Read More →
avatar for Kent McDonald

Kent McDonald

Agile Practice Lead, B2T Training
Kent J. McDonald uncovers better ways of delivering value by doing it and helping others do it. His more than 15 years of experience include work in business analysis, strategic planning, project management, and product development in a variety of industries including financial services, health insurance, performance marketing, human services, nonprofit, and automotive. He is active in the business analysis and agile software development... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sun C

11:30

Marketing scrum vs IT scrum – two case studies who now ‘act first and apologise later’. (Jeroen Molenaar)
Limited Capacity full

Summary

Learn about Scrum (usually a software development framework) being used in a Marketing department. How is it different?





Description.



As we know, Scrum is the perfect framework for IT / software development projects to learn, adapt to change and deliver great software of value, faster.

But is Scrum also usable outside of software development? Can we apply similar or maybe even the same principals in other departments in the enterprise?

Yes, we can! And yes there are differences but there are also a lot of similarities.

We successfully implemented Scrum in the marketing departments of two large companies: The Dutch AAA and ING Bank. Both companies are now using Scrum for the development of new campaigns, their full commercial expressions and even at the product development level. They wanted a faster time to market, more ownership, and greater innovation. How did we approach and realized a transition with those goals in the marketing environment? And what are the results?

So when we are not delivering software but other things, how does Scrum change? Well, a great deal actually. The people working in these other departments are, in general, quite different to those in Software Development (and yes more than you would expect). This means coaches or change agents need to take another approach.

Since the people are different, it is possible to go faster or ‘deeper’ in certain areas. Entrepreneurial skills or ambitions are more present in marketing. This gives a sense of ‘act first apologize later’, taking ownership, a higher drive to succeed, and upfront and willing behavior. Scrumming here means thinking more about business goals and KPIs (how to go from department to scrumteam goals for example). After that the fun begins…


Speakers
avatar for Jeroen Molenaar

Jeroen Molenaar

Agile Consultant, Xebia
I am an eager and result driven Agile coach / Change agent with a broad experience and background in Java (web) development and architecture. I build an extensive knowledge and experience in the Scrum methodology and am a pragmatic, hands-on, yet a creative solution solver. I like building bridges between business and IT and like to call myself the "well communicating nerd". In the agile coaching role I try to motivate team members, enabling... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 11:30 - 12:00
Daytona

12:00

Conference Lunch
Tuesday July 29, 2014 12:00 - 14:00
Osceola ABCD

12:00

Exhibits OPEN
Tuesday July 29, 2014 12:00 - 15:45
Osceola ABCD

14:00

Implementing Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) at Panera Bread: A Recipe for Success (Mark Lines)
Limited Capacity full

Panera Bread is a very successful and rapidly growing bakery-cafe chain with over 1700 cafes in 44 US States and in Canada. In early 2013 the President made it clear that he was concerned about IT’s ability to keep up with the pace of change of the business. Panera decided that they need to transform the enterprise to apply agile delivery in a disciplined fashion. In this talk we show how within one year the company moved from a traditional model to an agile approach that is very aligned with the company’s established business agility.



This talk is a a balanced retrospective of things that went well, challenges that were encountered, steps taken to address issues, and plans for further improvements. The approach is based on applying the Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) process decision framework.



Topics

- How the success of the first pilot project prompted the President to ask for all IT solutions to be developed using agile

- How a senior level IT agile skeptic became an agile evangelist 

- How we won the business over and received commitment for dedicated Product Owners on every team

- How lightweight agile governance was initiated in the PMO

- How we rescued an agile team that was struggling with Scrum


Speakers
avatar for Mark Lines

Mark Lines

Managing Partner & Agile Coach, Scott Ambler + Associates
Mark is an Enterprise Agile Coach, change agent, and co-creator of the Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) framework. With Scott Ambler, he is co-author of Disciplined Agile Delivery: A Practitioner's Guide to Agile Software Delivery in the Enterprise. He helps organizations all over the world transform from traditional to agile methods. He writes for many publications and is a frequent speaker at industry conferences. Mark blogs about DAD at... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 14:30
Daytona

14:00

Agile Quality and Risk Management (Elisabeth Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity full

Traditional approaches to quality and risk management involve quality gates, change control boards, feature freeze and code freeze milestones, and independent QA or Test groups. These approaches stabilize quality, but sacrifice agility. They don't work for Agile teams. Yet buggy fragile code is even more dangerous for Agile teams where so much is changing so often. This leads to the inevitable question: if the traditional approaches to quality and risk management don't work in an Agile context, what does?



Practices vary across organizations, but all successful teams emphasize the same underlying principles of fast feedback, high visibility, collaboration, and alignment. This talk examines various approaches Agile teams have taken to increase quality, mitigate risk, and ultimately ensure they are delivering the highest possible value for their stakeholders. Along the way you'll hear real world success stories and cautionary tales.

Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth  Hendrickson

Elisabeth Hendrickson

Director Quality Engineering, Cloud Foundry, Pivotal


Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Miami

14:00

Agent Provocateur (Dajo Breddels)
Limited Capacity filling up

This session isn’t about a particular brand of lingerie or how to become an undercover agent who acts to entice another person to commit an illegal act, however interesting that may be. Instead, the focus is on being a change agent by using tools from the field of Provocative Coaching.



One of the most heard phrases is: “There is no silver bullet” as a way to highlight that there is not one perfect answer for any situation. Well, this is true for coaching too. Most of us have experienced that sometimes our normal coaching arsenal just is not getting the job done. This session covers new counter intuitive coaching techniques, which are based on Provocative Therapy from Frank Farrely. This approach often contradicts with traditional coaching by leveraging the three central themes of Challenge, Humor and Warmth. Join me in a Listen, Do and Laugh workshop focused on learning why and when to best use Provocative Coaching and practice how to combine the themes to create memorable, effective and super fun coaching interventions.

Speakers
avatar for Dajo Breddels

Dajo Breddels

Coach, Dajo Breddels Coaching
Dajo Breddels, Agile Coach with a big interest in developing new playful and creative ways to give insights and help in cultural transformation.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sanibel

14:00

Breaking Down the Barriers: Communities of Practice and Cross-Silo Communication (Evan Leybourn)
Limited Capacity full

Skills sharing, collaboration and cross-silo communication, necessary for Agile projects, can be difficult in matrix organisations where common business practices may be shared across multiple business units. Organisations that strive for continuous improvement in these practices need a mechanism to identify, track and circulate the latest industry trends, techniques and tools. Additionally this mechanism should support the consistent management, and development, of common skills across the organisation.



This workshop will look at ways in which organisations can utilise informal ‘Communities of Practice’ (CoP) as a means of improving overall communication between business and technical functions. CoP's are informal, self-organising, & self-regulating groups of people who share a passion for something they do and regularly interact with each other as a means of continuous improvement. Through an interactive workshop, we will examine how organisations can;



* Provide a forum for the cooperation of activities (outside of projects) between business functions;

* Identify linkages & opportunities to collaborate on strategic business projects and coordinate the delivery of specific business practice projects;

* Provide an informal point of contact for organisational staff on topics that affect the business practice;

* Utilise Lean Coffee and other Agile practices for efficient and fun meetings.

Speakers
avatar for Evan Leybourn

Evan Leybourn

Author, Directing the Agile Organisation
Evan is an experienced leader, coach and published author in the developing field of Agile Business Management; applying the successful concepts and practices from the Lean and Agile movements to corporate management. Evan has a passion for building effective and productive organisations, filled with actively engaged and committed staff while ensuring high-levels of customer satisfaction. Evan's experiences when holding executive and board... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sarasota

14:00

Discover the Power of Pair Testing! (Pradeepa Narayanaswamy)
Limited Capacity filling up

In agile teams, it’s inevitable that team members are expected to be more cross-functional and produce high quality product for their customers. How can agile team members become more cross-functional and take ownership of quality? Often times there seems to be a scarcity of testing talents in agile teams. How can agile teams attain highest quality product when working with very few or no testing talents?



For agile team members to take ownership of quality, Pradeepa Narayanaswamy exposes the power of “Pair Testing” that greatly supports providing faster feedback and producing high quality product all along as a team. For the scarce testing talents and an effective way to become more cross-functional, one approach is for team members to pair up on various (unit, integration, exploratory and several other) testing efforts that ensures the shared eye on quality and learning. Pradeepa talks about several pairing options and opportunities between various specialties in an agile team. She also talks about some “non-typical” pairing opportunities with DevOps, Operations, Sales, Marketing and Support members to name a few.



As a new or an experienced agile team member, learn how to spearhead this technique in your team at various levels and spread the buzz to other teams. As a tester, learn how to get the non-testing talents excited and experience the value of pair testing.


Speakers
avatar for Pradeepa Narayanaswamy

Pradeepa Narayanaswamy

Enterprise Agile Coach, Capgemini
As an Agile Coach, Trainer and Consultant, Pradeepa Narayanaswamy is a self-proclaimed “Agile Passionista” who strongly believes in the agile principles used in transforming organizations to build superior quality products. In her current role, Pradeepa works as an Trainer, Agile coach and mentor to several software development teams and help them succeed with building high quality products. She is also working with several leadership teams... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 3

14:00

Behavior Driven Development (BDD): Value Through Collaboration (Viktor Farcic, Jordi Falguera)
Limited Capacity filling up

In this session attendees will learn how to efectivelly write software requirements in a way that they can be used and understood by anyone (stakeholders, developers, testers, managers...) and, at the same time, can be executed to automatically test each developed functionality.



You will learn how to write users stories, narratives and scenarios and how to communicate them to all involved in the project. All scenarios will be executed automatically.



This session will involve participation from the public and all scenarios and automation will be done on-site by volunteers.



Behavior Driven Development (BDD) is an Agile process designed to keep focus on stakeholder’s value throughout the whole project. Premise of BDD is that requirement has to be written in a way that everyone understands it – business representative, analyst, developer, tester, manager etc. Key is to have unique set of artifacts understood and used by everyone. BDD story is written by the whole team and used as both requirements and executable test cases. It is a way to do Test Driven Development (TDD) with clarity that can not be accomplished with Unit Testing. It is a way to describe and test functionality in (almost) natural language.

Speakers
avatar for Jordi Falguera

Jordi Falguera

Agile Practice Director, UST Global
avatar for Viktor Farcic

Viktor Farcic

Software Architect, everis
Viktor Farcic is a Software Architect during the day. Out of his working hours he's working on transitions from Waterfall to Agile processes with special focus on Behavior-Driven Development (BDD), Test-Driven Development (TDD) and Continuous Integration (CI).



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Tampa

14:00

Protection Poker: An Agile Security Risk Game (Laurie Williams, Catherine Louis)
Limited Capacity seats available

Each time a new feature is added to their product, the agile teams should consider the security risk to a product caused by the new functionality and should brainstorm ways to implement the function securely. Does the new feature add new pages that can be used by an attacker to enter the system? What kind of input validation should be performed? Should the private data be encrypted? Should we log all data access so forensics can be performed in case of a breach? What would an insider want to do with this data? How can we make sure the admin doesn’t have more privilege than necessary? The team needs to put on a black hat and think like an attacker!



Laurie and Catherine share a Planning Poker-type practice called Protection Poker that leverages a diversity of ideas, experience, and knowledge related to software security. Protection Poker provides a collaborative, interactive, and informal structure for abuse case development and threat modeling leading to a software security risk estimate and security risk reduction. Through Protection Poker, the team reduces the risk of design flaws with serious security implications. The test team will learn about areas in the code that need more testing to check for implementation bugs that can be leveraged by attackers to allow them to get into a system. And, Protection Poker also helps to spread software security knowledge throughout a team as the team "plays the game".



Laurie shares the results of a study of the use of Protection Poker with a software development team at RedHat. The study indicated Protection Poker was effective for brainstorming security risks and the mitigation of these risks and for spreading security knowledge throughout the team.



Laurie and Catherine lead the session participants through an interactive Protection Poker exercise. Participants will analyze the security risk of sample new features, learning to collaboratively think like an attacker. Participants will also learn about “building security” into their products by discussing implementation and testing strategies for sample new features to reduce their security risk.

Speakers
CL

Catherine Louis

cll group
Looking forward to producing the most awesome stage, "Working With Customers" thanks to our great review team and Shane Hastie!
avatar for Laurie Williams

Laurie Williams

Professor, North Carolina State University
Laurie Williams is a Professor in the Computer Science Department of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU). Her research focuses on software security particularly in relation to healthcare IT; agile software development practices and processes; software reliability, and software testing and analysis. Laurie received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Utah, her MBA from Duke University Fuqua... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Naples

14:00

Implementing Continuous Delivery: Evolving your Architecture (Rachel Laycock)
Limited Capacity full

There are several factors to implementing Continuous Delivery: organisational, process and architectural. Each one could require significant changes in your organisation.



This talk will focus on the architecture of your application. How do you design a system you intend to rapidly deploy? How do you avoid common pitfalls or anti-patterns, which will hinder your ability to deliver? How do you refactor your existing code base to suit rapid delivery? I will address patterns such as micro-services and evolutionary architecture, which can speed up your delivery.



I will also look at how to tackle the dreaded ball-of-mud, that may be currently holding you back, without re-writing your entire architecture.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Laycock

Rachel Laycock

Lead Consultant, ThoughtWorks


Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 5/6

14:00

Getting the X-Factor: Corporate Planning for the Agile Business (Karl Scotland, Rachel Weston Rowell)
Limited Capacity seats available

The pace of change is accelerating as technology advances, the economy becomes more global and markets become increasingly disruptive. As a result organisations are surviving for dramatically shorter periods of times. For example the average lifespan of organisations on the Standard and Poors 500 index has reduced by over 50 years on the last century, from 67 to 15 years. To survive, businesses need to change the way they operate at a corporate level, as well as becoming more Agile in their delivery capability. This involves moving to a model of co-creating and deploying an evolving corporate strategy, rather than centrally selecting and defining its rigid implementation, in order to create clear alignment, transparency and adaptability.



Join Karl and Rachel as they share the latest learnings from Rally Software's journey of evolving their quarterly planning and steering. They will introduce one tool they have recently discovered and had positive experiences with, the X-matrix, through which strategy deployment can be achieved. This is a simple, single A3 page format, which visualises the correlations and contributions between strategies, tactics, improvements, results and departments. In this session you will work through completing an X-matrix for an example organisation.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel  Weston Rowell

Rachel Weston Rowell

Agile Fellow, Rally Software
Rachel Weston Rowell is an Agile Fellow in the Rally Software business within CA Technologies. Throughout her career, she has worked actively to help people create more collaborative, engaged, and humane working environments. Her passion is leveraging expert facilitation to create spaces in which empowered teams can solve our toughest problems.
avatar for Karl Scotland

Karl Scotland

Lean Agile Consultant, Karl Scotland Ltd
I help businesses become Learning Organisations. | | Over the last 15 years I have been an advocate of Lean and Agile approaches to achieve this, working with companies including the BBC, Yahoo!, EMC Consulting and Rally Software. During this time, I have been a pioneer of using Kanban Systems for software development, a founding member of both the Lean Systems Society and Limited WIP Society, as well as being active in the community and a... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola A

14:00

The Show Must Go On - Agile Leadership Lessons from a Life in the Theatre (John Krewson)
Limited Capacity seats available

When creating a play or movie, what are the first three rules of directing? Casting, casting, and casting. How does Saturday Night Live produce sketch after sketch of comedy? By iterating. The principles of leadership and management in the worlds of theatre, TV and film offer a multitude of lessons for those who are leading high performing Agile teams. In this talk, John Krewson will walk through the journey of creating and delivering theatrical and film productions, then show how those principles can be used to improve the process of software delivery. He’ll dive into specific approaches and methods used by performers and directors that harness creativity, develop shared understanding, empower and motivate teams, and manage focus. The session will include multiple interactive demonstrations to further illustrate the application of these principles.



At the end of the talk, he'll lead a facilitated discussion with the attendees to find similar principles among their personal interests. This discussion leads to a personalization of Agile leadership themes. For new leaders, finding metaphors they’re comfortable with will help them build their own leadership style. For seasoned leaders, the session offers good examples of how Agile leadership principles can be applied.



John has been a software development leader for ten years; an actor and director for over twenty, having appeared on Saturday Night Live in 1997.


Speakers
avatar for John Krewson

John Krewson

Agile Transformation Lead, MasterCard
John Krewson (@johnkrewson) is the Agile Transformation Lead at MasterCard and a consultant whose expertise is based on real-world experience rather than regurgitated dogma. His communication skills, patience, and Agile experience blend into a unique style that is both approachable and entertaining. Since he still hasn't found a silver bullet to eliminate all the complexities of software development, John will continue to challenge... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sun C

14:00

Raising Agility: Bringing Up The Next Generation Of Thought Leaders [Our Children!!] (Daniel Gullo)
Limited Capacity seats available

We have crossed the chasm with Agile adoption and are well into the pragmatist and conservative phase; great progress for our world of work today. What about the world of education and our world of work tomorrow?



Imagine working with teams in the future which are already "Agile" because they grew up that way...



They say that children are our future. How do we engage our children in such a way that we are cultivating the next generation of innovative thought leaders?



This session is intended for parents, grand-parents, family members, caregivers, teachers, and any others who interact with children or have an interest in mentoring children. We will talk about techniques that can be used both at home and in other settings to provide flow and balance in learning for children. Constructivist models, developmental psychology, and other concepts will be used to show how we can instill Agile Values and Principles that the children can take forward with them.



The concepts will also be tied to application in the workplace, which I regularly do as I am coaching and training for Agile adoption over the last 7+ years.



The activities provide opportunities for group and team discussion so that the session is interactive and engaging; i.e. following the idea that we learn best in 10-15 minute segments vs. hour long blocks of time.

Speakers
DG

Daniel Gullo

CSC, CST, Principal Consultant, SolutionsIQ
Daniel Gullo | Certified Scrum Coach (CSC), Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Principal Consultant | SolutionsIQ | | For more than 25 years, Daniel has been teaching, coaching, and consulting for organizations of many sizes; from startups to multi-national enterprises. Daniel has lead large scale Agile adoption initiatives for organizations in Financial Services, Education, Health Care, Bio-tech, Pharma, Information Technology Consulting... Read More →


Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola B

14:00

Agile for Safety-critical & Regulatory-Bound Products (Agile where you can kill someone) (Nancy Van Schooenderwoert, Brian Shoemaker)
Limited Capacity filling up

Many organizations that provide regulated, high-assurance, safety-critical software and hardware development struggle with Agile. High-assurance products are ones that may risk human life and health. Product development challenges include audits, regulatory documentation, risk management, safety, security, and traceability.



Based on our experience using Agile with medical device software and hardware, you learn how to initiate and maintain Agile practices for these types of systems.



We share how tools like story and impact mapping are integrated into product development. We explain how to use safety stories, integrate traceability using your story map, and specify tests to address safety and hazard mitigation requirements. We share how to proactively conduct incremental hazard analysis and mitigation and formal design review to satisfy regulatory requirements. And we’ll explain how stakeholders—including marketing, engineering, and service—can share a coherent vision early in development to support the special demands of the high assurance products.



This presentation is relevant to all types of high-assurance software and hardware development projects. Join us as we show how you can use a lean process to develop these types of products, which are so important for health and safety in modern life. Using actual medical device examples, we show how to create thin vertical slices of organizational activity to deliver fully compliant, high quality, high assurance, customer value on time.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

President, Lean-Agile Partners, Inc.
Two key interests: Agile Engineering, Agile Contracts. | | I'm interested in bringing Agile and Lean ideas to engineering disciplines beyond software - especially where it matters most: safety-critical products that simply HAVE TO WORK. Been doing this for many years; now seeing a big increase in demand for it. If you're an EE, ME or other engineer wanting to be Agile, let's talk! | | Boundaries between companies get in the way of trust... Read More →
avatar for Brian Shoemaker

Brian Shoemaker

Principal Consultant, ShoeBar Associates
Brian Shoemaker consults for healthcare products companies in computer system validation, software quality assurance, and electronic records and signatures. He has conducted validation both on product software and on internal software, developed software quality systems, audited software quality processes (including agile methodology), and evaluated 21 CFR Part 11 compliance. He has had clients in clinical diagnostics, medical device engineering... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 4

14:00

More about the agile mindset and whatever else is on your agile mind! (Linda Rising)
Limited Capacity full

After giving the closing keynote on "The Agile Mindset" I've

continued to follow the research in agile thinking and I try to translate the results to be helpful to the

software community. I'll open and close with what I've been learning. This "agile sandwich" can surround

your questions about this topic or anything else about your brain and your struggles.


Speakers
LR

Linda Rising

Linda Rising LLC


Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Gainesville

14:00

Testing Inside Your Timebox: Death to the Hardening Sprint (John Hughes)
Limited Capacity seats available

Testing sprints? Hardening sprints? Why do so many of us have these and other ways to get around completing all our required testing inside our defined timeboxes? Isn’t our goal to produce deployable features at the end of every Sprint?



During our session, we will examine why it’s so hard to accomplish all necessary testing inside the iteration and show how to complete these tests within your timebox. Through interactive discussion and real world examples, we will provide insights on foreseeing, overcoming, and avoiding your hurdles and send you home with both long term methods and short term actions that will yield tangible results in achieving your goal.



Our session will:

• Illustrate the value of completing all of your testing inside your timebox

• Identify the challenges in completing all these tests in such as seemingly short period of time

• Discuss ideas and options to successfully overcome these challenges

• Explore how to enable your organization and environment for efficient, rapid testing

• Discuss real world examples of enablement and how we navigated the pain points of enabling testing processes that allow complete testing within an iteration

• Explore DevOpsSec and how achieving testing within your timebox is a precursor to DevOpsSec

• Provide short term tactics and actions to immediately improve your ability to complete your testing

• Address your Agile testing related questions



Most of us implement Agile to reduce the time to deliver valuable working software and to increase the frequency of delivery with high quality through increased and earlier collaboration, shorter feedback loops, and reduced risk. While you can show improvement over Waterfall by performing basic Agile methods, you cannot really live the dream without optimizing your Agile execution – especially in the area of Agile testing.



You will leave this session armed with the right knowledge to improve delivery on your current project or start your new projects properly so that you or your clients can reap the benefits of efficient process and high-quality software capable of achieving continuous deployment of fully-tested code at the end of each iteration.

Speakers
avatar for John Hughes

John Hughes

Strategist, Blackstone Technology Group
John Hughes is an Agile Coach with Blackstone Technology Group's Federal Practice. He has developed and delivered solutions in the Federal IT space for over 17 years.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sun D

14:00

How to recognize the Zombie Persona Apocalypse (Michael Rawling)
Limited Capacity seats available

Are User Personas haunting you? Did your team create some personas at the start of your project but then never use them? Are they fading stuck up on a wall somewhere, technically now just dead weight...irrelevant, moaning...’braiinssssss’!!



User Personas can really help your team have productive conversations with stakeholders that shift away from debating personal opinions into decision-making based on empirical data. Mike Rawling will share his experience of how you can work with personas in a pragmatic way that fits into the world of Agile without compromising UX, XP/Agile or Lean principles.



Come to this session to find out how to blend personas into your Agile process so they continue to serve as a useful reference for your team and stakeholders throughout product development.



Get ready for a Zombie Persona Apocalypse!


Speakers
MR

Michael Rawling

Senior User Experience Engineer, Unruly Media Ltd
Michael Rawling is the Senior UX Engineer at Unruly Media, a successful social media video start-up. Mike’s experience in UX and UI development dates back to 1998 and since then has explored new ways of more effectively realising the massive potential that technology offers and that each product starts with. He has consulted on, designed, engineered and led such teams and initiatives for Tesco.com, Wiley, Camelot, Konami, LoveFilm and Granada... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Tallahassee

14:00

UX Runway – the trials and tribulations of a UX and Agile environment (Natalie Warnert)
Limited Capacity full

User Experience? Lean? Scrum? Agile? How can these all fit together and be incorporated into stories and Sprints? This session will explore the benefits of high quality, more usable and consistent software with a shorter user feedback loop by cohesively incorporating UX into the Agile process via the 'UX Runway'. The idea was originally from the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), but has much more detail into how UX can be integrated below the program at the Agile team level.



The UX Runway explores the concept of having UX work 1-2 iterations ahead of the development team with some new insights on how to keep UX lean and agile at the team and program level. These ideas include:



-Treating the UX team as its own Agile team

-How to use just-in-time design and minimum viable product (MVP) Lean design for the UX iteration deliverable

-Planning into the iteration capacity the notion of 10- 20 percent re-work to the initial minimum viable product

-Lean UX principles of problem focused design and get out of the building when incorporating user research into the MVP



Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of how UX works, the different UX roles that contribute to Agile projects, how to utilize and integrate both a centralized and decentralized UX team onto their projects, and how to keep UX (and other dependent teams) from becoming a bottleneck with a bit of additional planning. They will learn how to appropriately plan UX work and deliverables ahead of it being developed by using a UX Runway while still eliminating waste by staying lean and responding rapidly to change.


Speakers
avatar for Natalie Warnert

Natalie Warnert

Agile Transformation Coach, Salesforce.com
Talk to me about Women In Agile, Metrics, Agile UX, value mapping and Agile in large retail and sales organizations. | | Also check out the #WomenInAgile session on Sunday July 24 prior to the conference and register to attend! Be the change you want to see! https://t.co/A9rekeyuyl



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 1/2

14:45

Technology-Driven Development: Using Automation and Techniques to Grow an Agile Culture (Hiroyuki Ito)
Limited Capacity full

I have leaded the new agile project by “Technology-Driven Development”. The word “Technology-Driven Development” has 3 meanings: the mechanism to make the work more effective, to develop cooperative relationships with stakeholders like the business analyst or managers, and to drive learning of the team members by technical practices and methods such as Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery, TDD (Test-Driven Development) and BDD (Behavior-Driven Development).

I used “Technology-Driven Development” not only as a technology base for developing new smartphone applications, but also as a driver of developing engineering skills for my team consisted of many young and immature members. It made juniors develop software and solve problems as well or better than seniors with support of stakeholders.

In this session, first I present the concrete mechanism of “Technology-Driven Development” I have introduced to my team. Then the results of learning, cooperation and product development by the method I proposed. In addition, the problems, possibilities and future of it discussed in the latter part.

Speakers
avatar for 伊藤 宏幸(Hiroyuki Ito)

伊藤 宏幸(Hiroyuki Ito)

Agile Coach & Automation Architect, Yahoo Japan Corporation
ヤフー株式会社所属。 | アジャイルコーチおよび自動化アーキテクトとして、実際に開発現場に入り、CI/CD・TDD・BDD(Behavior- Driven Development) をベースとした技術基盤の構築と、それらをベースとした開発プロセスの改善支援を行なっている。モットーは、開発効率の向上による Be happy... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 14:45 - 15:15
Daytona

15:15

Conference PM Break
Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:15 - 15:45
Sun Lobby/Osceola Lobby

15:45

Agile in the Federal Space: Best Practices for Keeping Documentation Lean (Omar Silver, Olivia Kasik)
Limited Capacity full

One of the major tenets of the Agile Manifesto lauds “working software over comprehensive documentation.” However, in a heavily regulated environment, such as the Federal government, comprehensive documentation ensures traceability and is viewed as a necessary and critical artifact of the standard software development process. While the government is increasing its support of modular IT development approaches, documentation requirements set by Federal policies and processes continue to pose problems for Agile teams in the Federal IT space. In this presentation, we will explore the challenges presented by documentation requirements through a case study of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Emergency Operations Network Incident Management System (EON IMS) development team. We will then identify best practices used by the EON IMS team that can help other Agile teams in the Federal IT space overcome these obstacles.

Speakers
avatar for Olivia Kasik

Olivia Kasik

Organizational Process Improvement Analyst, Dovel Technologies, Inc.
Olivia Kasik is an Associate at Dovel Technologies, Inc. Kasik has experience creating and managing documentation for Federal IT projects. With a background in technical writing, Kasik is passionate about removing obstacles associated with documentation for agile teams in the Federal IT space.
avatar for Omar Silver

Omar Silver

Program Director, Dovel Technologies
Mr. Silver is a leader in the area of delivery methodology and practice and has ushered development and maturation of the Dovel Agile approach for Federal Government customers. Silver has worked on the FDA Emergency Operational Network, Incident Management (EON IMS) since joining Dovel in 2010 and has overseen the successful implementation of Dovel’s Agile methodology within that program. Silver has over 15 years of experience delivering... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 16:15
Daytona

15:45

Agile Development Practice Basics (For Everyone, Not just Programmers) (Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity full

Come and learn how agile values and principles translate into pragmatic, productive practices. Learn how to begin living these values in your own practice.



* Develop your personal sense of agility.

* Learn what it means to use safety to unlock the creativity and productivity of your teams!

* Learn how to get software to market, frequently and reliably, without a lot of hassle!

* Learn how to build just-in-time

* Learn how to build to-need

* Have some fun!



Tim will use slides, puzzles, index cards, discussion, catch phrases, and any dirty trick at his disposal (including some special flash cards!) to give you a proper jump-start into the world of agile practices.



Come and started your agile journey on the right foot!


Speakers
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic
Software development as a thinking art | Transitioning to Agile from Whatever | Programming Languages | Microhabits | Refactoring, TDD, Programming, Testing, Managing | Flying drones for fun | NOT POLITICS NOR SPORTS. I'm not qualified.



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Miami

15:45

The Power and Potential of Mentoring - Creating a Mentorship Program for your Organization (Peter Saddington)
Limited Capacity full

Did you know that over half of Nobel Prize winners were apprenticed by other Nobel laureates? To grow companies and teams to performance you have to take servant leadership to it’s logical conclusion: Intentionally mentoring and growing others. This is a time-tested and practiced art. As a marriage counselor and Organizational Consultant, I’m passionate about this art and would love to share with you how to take your teams to the next level of performance. Let it be known, this is a long, tough road, but the benefits are worth more than their weight in gold. Let’s talk about mentoring and how to get started, the 6 areas of a mentor relationship and 6 tips for mentors.

Speakers

Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 1/2

15:45

Creating Partnership: Essential Conversations (Susan DiFabio)
Limited Capacity full

Learn how to have the essential--but sometimes difficult--conversations that create partnership.



Consider these comments we’ve overheard many times in various forms:



Manager: “I’m at a loss. I’m trying to be *Agile*. I’ve told my team they are empowered, I’ve even skipped sprint planning so they won’t clam up and wait for me to tell them what to do. But my employee satisfaction numbers are still down! What is it they want?”



Team member: “What does our boss do every day? She’s never around when we need her! We need a new server, but the Director of IT won’t authorize it without boss-lady’s approval. And even if she were around she’d probably just tell me I’m *empowered* and I need to demonstrate initiative.”



It seems like this should be a simple problem to discuss. But, when there is a history of hierarchy and one-way performance evaluation, it is far from easy. When people have been locked into up/down relationships, it takes both courage and vulnerability to begin the dialogue.



In this session, we will share a process that we have used to help managers and teams start conversations about what they need from each other to be successful. Whether you are a manager, a director, or the head of an organization, this process can help start a two-way conversation.



Learn how to set the conditions for candid and valuable conversations between managers and team members. Gain new insights that support true partnership between managers and teams. Together, you will identify changes that will benefit managers, team members, and the business.



The presentation will include both background theory and real-world examples of such essential conversations. We’ll also share our lessons learned from helping managers and teams move toward partnership.



This session is the result of a collaboration between Esther Derby and Susan DiFabio. Together, we’ve designed and refined a way to facilitate conversations that help managers and teams reshape their relationships towards greater partnership and empowerment.


Speakers
avatar for Susan DiFabio

Susan DiFabio

Agile Coach, Susan K DiFabio Consulting LLC
I am an independent Agile coach focused on helping teams and organizations find success applying Agile principles. I spent many years on project teams performing roles ranging from developer to designer to project manager to product manager. During that time I witnessed first-hand the success of iterative development as compared with waterfall processes and I experienced the importance of building relationships and valuing people. I am passionate... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Gainesville

15:45

Improving Collaboration By Doing (Next To) Nothing (Brandon Carlson, Tim Gifford)
Limited Capacity full

Remember when, in your retrospective, you discussed the need for your three teams to communicate on a regular basis? That would have resolved the architectural disconnect last sprint, right? You eagerly adopted the well documented Scrum of Scrums pattern in order to prevent this type of thing from happening again. Your teams are now meeting every morning to talk about the pressing issues of the day and keep everyone on the same page. There's only one problem: It didn't work.



Unfortunately, many of our attempts at improving collaboration miss the mark in practice and are simply modernized versions of old techniques. Whether it's a Wiki (Intranet?), Sharepoint (Shared Drive?), Scrum of Scrums (more meetings?), or PSI planning (even more meetings?). It is time to look at collaboration differently instead of putting a new face on old ideas.



Join us to learn about how incentive programs can encourage knowledge scarcity, laziness is our default choice, as well as other problems frequently encountered when trying to scale up collaboration beyond a single team. In addition, you will discover some tools and techniques for improving collaboration that you can start using today and some others that you may be using tomorrow.


Speakers
avatar for Brandon Carlson

Brandon Carlson

IT Nerd, Lean TECHniques, Inc.
A self-proclaimed nerd with over 15 years of experience, Brandon has become passionate about elevating the performance of IT as a whole, and has helped numerous organizations from startups to Fortune 100 companies improve their product development and delivery systems. Brandon’s current interests include data-driven product definition/development and professionalism in the world of IT. He can be reached on Twitter and pretty much everywhere... Read More →
avatar for Tim Gifford

Tim Gifford

Agile Coach, Lean TECHniques, Inc



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 4

15:45

Non Musical Chairs, an agile game to introduce and practice self organization (Bruno Sbille)
Limited Capacity seats available

"Okay team, let's do some Scrum, I will count to three and then you will collaborate and be self organized!

One....two..."

Asking a team to be self-organised can be confusing and difficult.

It's not natural, it's not easy and if you have ever lived in a command-and-control environment, it is certainly a paradigm change.



What if we could teach and practice ‘Self-Organisation’ playing one game that implies communication, movement...and chairs?

Let's have fun together discovering the importance of Trust in an Agile team.



"...Three !"

Speakers
avatar for Bruno Sbille

Bruno Sbille

CST, Trainer, Coach, ELLIBS
I'm a Trainer (CST, Agile, Soft Skills) and a Coach (Agile, Life Coach) | | I've been in IT and Business consultancy since 1999. In addition to my project management experience, since 2006 I had the opportunity to discover a lot of new "things" to put in my "toolbox": Scrum, Agile but also NLP, coaching, people management, creativity techniques... | | I'm passionate about "making things happen". I Blog regularly in English and... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Tampa

15:45

You Can’t be Great without Technical Excellence (James Grenning)
Limited Capacity seats available

In this talk we’ll look at why the technical practices of test-driven development, refactoring, continuous design, clean code and automated testing can help you and your organization be great. This talk is not just for the technical people. Business people need to understand that they cannot have a great product and productive team without technical excellence.



Technical excellence is more than two week sprints, a burn-down chart and a daily stand-up meeting. The basic rules of Agile or Scrum are not an end in themselves, but rather a staring point based upon principles and practices that allow and encourage teams to adopt, adapt, and refine their craft. Unfortunately, it too often seems that agile is just another micro-management approach.



Extreme Programming, the spur under the saddle that started this wild ride, is based on sound technical practices. Why do so few employ the engineering practices that are designed to support the tight iterative cycles of Agile and Scrum? The founders of Scrum expected you to pull in the engineering practices. They figured that once the continuous improvement cycle revealed the problems of poor product quality, hard to change code, wasted time debugging, long stabilization efforts and the ever growing burden of manual test, you'd hunt for solutions. Come to this session and see why you can't be great without technical excellence.


Speakers
avatar for James Grenning

James Grenning

President, Wingman Software Consulting
James Grenning’s trains, coaches and consults worldwide. With more than three decades of software development experience, both technical and managerial, James brings knowledge, skill, and creativity to software development teams and their management.  As his professional roots are in embedded software, James’ mission is to bring state-of-the-art technical and management practices to embedded development teams. He is the author of... Read More →


Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola B

15:45

Support is a Level Grind (Jeff Hackert)
Limited Capacity seats available

In this workshop, we will run through a process I've used with beleaguered deployment and infrastructure teams to help them get a handle on emergent work. Ad Hoc support requests can be debilitating for teams with time boxed or focused work in their backlogs. This kind of support is often a grind; emergent tasks are often not well defined. It is not always clear when, or even if, we should engage with them. When we do, the outcomes are often spotty and hard to measure.



DevOps is largely about breaking down the functional silos between software developers and operations teams. These silos inhibit feedback and create blind spots that effect software quality, deployment process, and operation of production services. This in turn drives unsustainable workloads and a poor customer experience. Kanban provides a path to a sustainable flow of work by shining a bright light on demand and capacity issues and exposing these bottlenecks. The two frameworks taken together work to facilitate continuous improvement of the deployment and operation of live services.



Video games make extensive use of the 'level grind' as a mechanism for improving a character's gear or its stats. The Gore Tusk Liver Grinder (our name for the process) provides a method for decomposing emergent work requests into something we can understand, commit to, and possibly enjoy. We take advantage of the same neural hack used in video games to drive engagement and apply it to 'on demand' work requests.



In this workshop we will learn to implement a basic Kanban board and put it to work as a tool to make better decisions and better commitments. We might also come to enjoy what had previously been a source of anxiety and dread.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff  Hackert

Jeff Hackert

Sr. Development Manager, Riot Games


Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sun C

15:45

Scaling the Coach (Jason Kline, Mike Register)
Limited Capacity full

How do you ensure that your organization has adequate coaching support to sustain an Enterprise Agile transformation? How do you scale your scrum masters and Agile coaches to an organization with 50, 100, or 200 teams? What selection criteria do you employ to ensure your organization has selected the most appropriate individuals to fulfill the roles of scrum master and enterprise coach? What issues/challenges do you face and what structures and support do you need to put in place to address them?



In this talk we will discuss our experiences and learnings scaling the coaching function to multiple levels of a large software organization. At Salesforce.com we have successfully grown and sustained an enterprise agile transformation that now encompasses 200+ scrum teams. Drawing heavily from our experiences as coaches at Salesforce.com, and presenting this talk as a work-in-progress, we will:



- Discuss WHY it is important to scale the coach in a large enterprise

- Candidly present the major challenges we have faced, what didn’t work, and how we have adapted our strategy accordingly

- Talk about the primary support structures we chose to put in place to scale effective coaching to the team, business unit, and portfolio levels of the organization.

- Reflect upon our experience of setting up a 3-tiered coaching model, and discuss the coaching interactions that take place at each level.

- Discuss the selection criteria for scrum masters and enterprise coaches, as well as the internal certification programs we have developed for each.

- Invite the audience to form teams, and participate by sharing what they might have done

- Host a Q&A




Speakers
avatar for Jason Kline

Jason Kline

Agile Coach, SolutionsIQ
Jason has over 20 years experience working in the technology industry, and specializes in helping companies continuously deliver value quickly by using Lean|Agile techniques. Currently an Enterprise Agile Coach and Trainer at SolutionsIQ, Jason splits his time between instructing classes, coaching Scrum and Kanban teams, and helping organizations transform. Prior to SolutionsIQ, Jason held engineering and Agile transformational leadership... Read More →
avatar for Mike Register

Mike Register

Sr Agile Consultant, SolutionsIQ
Agile coach, consultant and change agent with a passion for enabling teams to deliver high quality software quickly to market that addresses continually changing business conditions. | | 11 years Agile experience in a variety of organizations and industries. 30+ years overall software development experience as an Engineer, Manager, Director of SW Engineering and Agile Coach/Trainer. Have led Agile transformations at multiple companies as... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sanibel

15:45

Tribes and Travelers: The Agile Scaling World Café Workshop (Charles Bradley, Uta Kapp)
Limited Capacity filling up

Scaling is a very hot topic in our circles these days, isn't it? Using crowd sourcing, self-organization, and World Cafe techniques, we... No, scratch that... YOU(!) will create a learning bonanza of monumental proportions. Using a short set of exercises facilitated by your able hosts, you will utilize "Individuals and Interactions" facilitation techniques to share and absorb knowledge about the "World" of Agile scaling approaches. You will have an opportunity to go deeper on approaches you are familiar with, as well as be exposed to some of the characteristics of other approaches -- maybe ones you've never heard of. We expect that we'll see discussions on the Scaled Agile Framework(tm), Large Scale Scrum, The Spotify approach, Enterprise Scrum, Enterprise/Portfolio Kanban, Lean Software Development, Lean Startup at Scale, Agility Path, Pattern Language of Programs, and a host of others. We're especially hoping that some people with knowledge about less known or 'less named' scaling techniques will show up and help educate us on what they have innovated around. The focus in this session will be about you learning and exchanging information with your peers. We will finish the session with a “tribes and travelers” World Café style bazaar and will upload a collection of photos and videos to the cloud, so that your takeaways will be available as close to real time as possible!



Reflecting a diverse “World” view, the skilled facilitators have backgrounds as diverse as Germany, Africa, and Texas, not to mention a whole bunch of Agile and scaling techniques! They will focus on helping YOU get the most out of the live workshop and maximize the learning outcomes. Participants will receive a handout that includes some pertinent information about the more well known scaling approaches. Participants will get the most out of this session if they have experienced Agile on a scale of 2-3 teams or more working on the same product/system. Come learn from the very best practitioners in the industry, your fellow conference peers!


Speakers
CB

Charles Bradley

Scrum Coach in Chief, Professional Scrum Trainer, ScrumCrazy.com
Charles Bradley is the Scrum Coach-in-Chief for http://www.ScrumCrazy.com, a Scrum Coaching and Training company. He is an experienced Scrum Coach, a Professional Scrum Trainer, and holds several certifications from both the Scrum Alliance and Scrum.org. At the team level, Charles coaches Scrum Teams "in the trenches" on Scrum, Agile, Kanban, User Stories, and Extreme Programming engineering practices(Unit Testing, Paired Programming, TDD, and... Read More →
avatar for Uta Kapp

Uta Kapp

CEO, AllScout GmbH
Uta Kapp is a consultant, trainer and coach for software development. She assists companies in business and management issues. Agile software development is the key to produce software in time and budget while controlling risk. As a trained systemic coach she helps teams to become self-organized and resolve their conflicts. Focus on the client needs requires continuous innovation and interactive communication which is fostered by an agile... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sarasota

15:45

Agile transformation: A personal, first-hand account (John Rudd, Charlie Rudd)
Limited Capacity seats available

**This first-hand account of an Agile transformation describes how Agile changed the owner-operators, as well as the company.**



* Participants will see how a traditionally-structured 30-plus -year-old company transformed itself from a largely hierarchical organization to a flat, manager-less community of professionals.



* The account will be presented from the point of view of the owner-operators of the company, and will include their personal stories of how their executive roles, expectations as stockholders, and notions of leadership changed, often in unexpected ways.



* Additionally, the talk will occasionally highlight a particular principle (such as increased transparency or distributed-decision-making), and describe how it was used to guide their decisions.



* The talk will include a candid discussion of the business problems that needed to be addressed, the change issues that were encountered, the evolution of the transformation process, the guiding principles that were applied, and a current assessment of progress.



* Before and after pictures will be shared that demonstrate how the organization changed in terms of policies, practices, structure, and facility. Examples include employee reviews, job descriptions, intellectual property, career development, managerial roles, and decision-making.



* The talk will include photos, videos, and infographics.

Presentation 

Speakers
CR

Charlie Rudd

CEO, SolutionsIQ
As the CEO of SolutionsIQ, Charlie leads the company’s exploration of what it means to be an Agile enterprise. His 30 years of experience includes systems development, program management, executive leadership, and business management. He has worked in the public and private sectors, including the software and consulting industries. Over the last 7 years, Charlie has been at the forefront of applying Agile principles to business management and... Read More →
avatar for John Rudd

John Rudd

Managing Director, SolutionsIQ
John is an industry leader in the emerging field of Agile portfolio services, which includes developing Agile business cases, transitioning from “buy and hold” strategies to dynamic funding of programs, and assessing risk and capturing business value under highly uncertain conditions. With 7 years of experience in the Agile space, his practice areas include change management, Agile portfolios, governance, and executive alignment... Read More →


Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Tallahassee

15:45

The Personal Agility Canvas - Mapping a path to better Agile Leadership (Dave Prior)
Limited Capacity full

Becoming Agile is never easy and never ending. Each of us who works with teams, and organizations spends a lot of time focusing on how to help others become more Agile. Just as critical though, is the need reflect on how WE can improve our capacity for Agile Servant Leadership because in different ways, each of us is our own greatest champion and worst enemy when it comes to Agile adoption.



This workshop is for intermediate to advanced Agile practitioners who are interested in deepening their understanding of how to do more of the things that already enable them as Agile leaders, and would like to explore the things that are holding them back.



This session will introduce the Five Measures and the Personal Agility Canvas, a tool modeled on the Business Model Canvas that Agile Practitioners can use to:

- Gain a better understanding of the facets impacting the potential for Agility in a work environment

- Set goals for improving individual capacity to become a better Agile Leader

- Identify key areas of focus for improvement

- Establish a plan to achieve the goals that have been set



Participants in this session will be guided through how to use these tool to assess and enhance their own personal agility. We will also spend time on how to facilitate the use of these tools with team members and organizations so that the participants are prepare to introduce this on site once they have returned to work.

Speakers
avatar for Dave Prior

Dave Prior

Agile Consultant, LeadingAgile
Dave Prior is an Agile Consultant for LeadingAgile but at Agile 2015 he'll be spending his time doing Video Podcasts for the Agile Alliance. If you'd like updates on the interviews as they get posted, please follow @mrsungo. | | He’s been managing technology projects, programs and portfolios since 1995. He began working with Agile in 2004 and became a Certified Scrum Trainer in 2009. Dave’s work as an educator and speaker has allowed... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Naples

15:45

Speed Grooming (D. Andre Dhondt)
Limited Capacity full

Are you frustrated with lengthy and inconclusive backlog refinement sessions? This workshop provides techniques to improve the speed and effectiveness of portfolio, program and team level backlog refinement.

For Program Managers & Agile Managers:

Want visibility and steering at the Portfolio, Program, and Team levels? In my experience with clients at scale, sending different people to Portfolio, Program, and Team-level planning causes a disconnect: poor estimation and poor technical runway. The argument has been that if we have developers on every Portfolio/Program-level discussion they'll never have any time to write code. Speed Grooming offers an alternative--invite the teams to talk about the future, but limit the discussion time. Learn how this applies at all levels so you can close the loop between Portfolio, Program, & Team planning. André Dhondt shares stories of real-world agile teams using this technique and how they've moved to a customer-empathy mindset.

For Delivery Team Members:

Want your sprint/iteration planning to take less than fifteen minutes (excluding tasking)? Want stories that are sufficiently well understood that we can actually finish everything we committed to? The key is in the way we decouple whole-team and individual homework during backlog grooming. How does it work? You need to develop great stories—customer-focused, just barely enough detail, in thin vertical slices, and collectively designed. André reviews story writing and describes how to do the three phases of grooming in under one team-hour a week (typically, two 25-minute meetings) by defining the phases—Exploring, Sizing, and Splitting, plus one off-line activity called Persona Mapping. Learn to avoid the overhead of long pre-backlog sessions, reduce Product Owner prep time, and prevent hidden dependencies from bumping a story out to the next iteration.


Speakers
DA

D. Andre Dhondt

Agile Coach, Rally Software
http://www.about.me/adhondt



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 3

15:45

Testing With A Stranger (Markus Gärtner)
Limited Capacity seats available

Exploratory testing is a style of testing that helps team members to use their personal freedom and accountability to the team to reduce business risks. Exploratory testing is an approach that combines test design, test execution, and test related learning in parallel. Therefore exploratory testing is an empirical approach to reduce risks in the software that were not foreseen so far, and combines well with empirical approaches to software development like Scrum. Since exploratory testing addresses the risks of the unknown unknowns, the things that we don't know that we don't know them, it also combines well with automated software tests.



Session-based exploratory testing has become widespread as an approach. In this workshop we will use a short session to get familiar with the provided application. During the debriefing of the first session, we will identify additional areas that might be interesting. For a second session pairs will pick focused sessions around those areas. We will separate the different areas of interest in order to tackle all of them with different pairs. A final debrief will help us derive a combined view on the quality of the application. Markus will wrap up the workshop with guidance and experience on how to integrate exploratory testing on a Scrum team.



For tester and programmer this workshop provides the possibility to collect practical experience using exploratory testing in sessions, or to extend previously existing ones. The participants will work together in pairs to test a product together. In the end, the results will be exchanged in a debriefing so that everyone can learn from everyone else.



Please bring a laptop or smartphone or tablet! You will get your hands dirty in here!

Speakers
avatar for Markus Gärtner

Markus Gärtner

it-agile GmbH
Markus Gärtner works as a testing programmer, trainer, coach, and consultant with it-agile GmbH, Hamburg, Germany. Markus, author of ATDD by Example - A Practical Guide to Acceptance Test-Driven Development, a student of the work of Jerry Weinberg, founded the German Agile Testing and Exploratory workshop in 2011. He is a black-belt instructor in the Miagi-Do school of Software Testing and contributes to the Softwerkskammer, the Germany Software... Read More →


Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 5/6

15:45

Whole Team Testing (Claire Moss)
Limited Capacity seats available

Sometimes there just isn't enough testing time for all the testing we'd like to do as a team. For those testers stuck in a phased approach, testing can end up feeling like a bottleneck in the system, with testers constantly asking for more time or more help. Having experienced that team dynamic, I know that I can't do all of this testing alone and I wouldn't want to. Whole team testing reduces the time waiting for feedback and improves communication to deliver customer value sooner.



So let's say you live in this utopia of collaboration. Everybody tests! The unparalleled beauty of your shared understanding astounds everyone and satisfies your clients. You get more feedback earlier and from different perspectives. Okay, now I envy you. When can I move in? Or I guess I could just build my own little utopia right here. But where do I start?



Steps to reproduce:

1. Dispel the convenient myth that only testers test

2. Find an opening, some opportune moment to share the testing love

3. Review your results together (mini retro)

4. Iterate and improve (coaching your way to victory)

5. Facilitate testing activities but don't hoard them



During this session, we will draw upon the collective wisdom of the attendees to compare notes on challenges and solutions that we have experienced as well as walking through a case study of whole team testing.



Whole team testing: because teams who own testing have more confidence in the customer value of their results

Speakers
avatar for Claire Moss

Claire Moss

Agile Tester, VersionOne
Software testing speaker, workshop facilitator, author, and blogger. Agile software tester working closely with product development team. I help teams to craft more testable user stories. Testing teacher, unit and integration test review and advisement, exploratory testing coach. Exploratory tester and test automator. | Claire Moss has always had a passion for writing, which might be a strange trait for a discrete mathematician, but that... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sun D

15:45

Value Teams : The Next Evolution of the Product Owner. (Ahmed Sidky)
Limited Capacity seats available

When people learn about agile they usually learn about Scrum (since it is the most popular flavor of agile). While Scrum is beneficial, it does not have answers to all the challenges of software development. One of the common challenges teams face is that of having an effective Product Owner. From experience, it is not about who is fulfilling the role of the Product owner in your organization but about the definition of the role itself. We have played with many different variations of the PO role, till we ended up with the concept and structure of the Value Team. To keep it simple, the Value Team is responsible for making sure the product is (1) Feasible, (2) Valuable, (3) Useable. After using Value Teams in many corporations (the session will have many real-life examples of this) they seems to be a practical solution to many problems about how agile can work in complex environments where there is no ONE product owner, but rather multiple organizations and people that have a say in what needs to get build and how. This session will present the idea of Value teams and answer questions on how to create them, how they operate, who is in charge, and why they are so critical to the success of the agile delivery team.

Speakers
AS

Ahmed Sidky

Principal Consultant, Sidky Consulting Group
Ahmed Sidky, also known as Dr. Agile, combines over fifteen years of software development experience, with research from his Ph.D. in Agile transformation and agility assessment to guide enterprise agile transformations in Fortune 100 companies, help small to medium companies worldwide realize sustainable organizational agility, and educate people, from CEOs to developers, on the agile mindset and how to create lean high performing teams. As... Read More →



Tuesday July 29, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola A

16:30

Agile and Six Sigma - Where do they meet (Mohamed Amr, Ayman Khalifa)
Limited Capacity full

Many Agile teams focus mainly on short-term improvements identified through daily collaborations or through period vehicles like retrospectives. They lack the bird-eye/strategic approach to process improvement or problem solving. This where Six Sigma comes along.



In this session, we will share our experience in combining Six Sigma (DMAIC) roadmap with agile development. We will focus on the areas where both meet, what gaps are filled by combining the 2 approaches and how both can benefits from each other.

Speakers
MA

Mohamed Amr

Agile Coach and Trainer, Agile Academy
Mohamed is an agile coach, trainer and a consultant who’s passionate about inspiring and enabling individuals and organizations to achieve sustainable agility. Mohamed combines around 10 years of experience in software engineering, process improvement and agile software development. Mohamed coaches, trains and mentor individuals, teams and organizations in adopting agile. Mohamed has trained more than 800 professionals and coached various teams... Read More →
AK

Ayman Khalifa

General Manager, Diagnosoft



Tuesday July 29, 2014 16:30 - 17:00
Daytona

17:30

Industry Analyst Panel Discussion
Limited Capacity full

Agile Trends and Future Directions- Come join the leading industry analysts as they discuss the latest trends and emerging best practices around Agile software development. Learn how the most successful software organizations are utilizing Agile to drive business performance. Find out how the latest innovations in Agile practices continue to mature as development organizations deploy Agile further across the enterprise.

Emcee - Jim Newkirk CenturyLink Cloud
Panelists:
Tom Grant - Cutter Consortium
Nathan Wilson - Gartner Research
Chris Rommel - VDC Research Group
Melinda Ballou - IDC 

Moderators
avatar for James Newkirk

James Newkirk

VP of Service Engineering, CenturyLink Cloud
As Tier 3's vice president of engineering, James oversees the development of Tier 3's cloud management platform. He brings almost 30 years experience in the software industry. Prior to Tier 3, James held senior leadership roles at Microsoft, Caradigm (GE/Microsoft Joint Venture) and ThoughtWorks. Earlier in his career he co-founded Object Mentor Inc with Robert C. Martin, a consulting firm that specialized in training and mentoring their... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Melinda Ballou

Melinda Ballou

Program Director - Application Life-Cycle Management, IDC
Melinda-Carol Ballou is the Program Director for IDC's Application Life-Cycle Management research in Bedford, MA. In this role, Ms. Ballou provides thought leadership, expert opinion, research, and analysis through comprehensive research on application life-cycle management (ALM), with specific focus on software life-cycle process configuration and management, software quality, and IT governance software. Ms. Ballou also offers competitive... Read More →
avatar for Tom Grant

Tom Grant

Senior Consultant, Net Objectives
Tom Grant is a senior consultant at Net Objectives. Previously, he was practice director for Agile Project Management & Software Engineering Excellence at Cutter Consortium, and a senior analyst at Forrester Research. Before that, he worked in software companies in Silicon Valley. Tom helps his clients with their software innovation strategy, which includes Agile, Lean, and other methods. | | Tom is a contributing member of the Agile... Read More →
CR

Chris Rommel

Executive Vice President, VDC Research Group
Chris Rommel is Executive Vice President with VDC Research, covering Machine-to-Machine (M2M) Communications, Embedded Software Technology and Hardware Development. Rommel was named a research vice president with VDC research overseeing M2M and embedded software in August 2011. He was previously a senior analyst with the research firm covering embedded software and tools from 2007 to 2011.
NW

Nathan Wilson

Principal Research Analyst, Gartner Research
Nathan Wilson is a principal research analyst in Gartner Research, where he focuses on agile development methodologies. Prior to joining Gartner, Mr. Wilson worked for more than 25 years as a developer, architect, technical lead and manager of both traditional and agile development projects.


Tuesday July 29, 2014 17:30 - 18:30
Sun C
 
Wednesday, July 30
 

07:30

Registration/Hospitality Desk OPEN
Wednesday July 30, 2014 07:30 - 17:30
Osceola Lobby

08:00

Conference Breakfast
Wednesday July 30, 2014 08:00 - 09:00
Sun Lobby

08:00

Coaches Clinic OPEN
Wednesday July 30, 2014 08:00 - 17:00
Osceola Lobby

08:00

Bookstore OPEN
Wednesday July 30, 2014 08:00 - 18:00
Osceola Lobby

08:30

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss?  Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.  

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment.  We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam daily huddle at 8:30 in the City Hall Lobby to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join! 

Wednesday July 30, 2014 08:30 - 09:00
City Hall Lobby - Open Jam

09:00

Best Job Ever (Diana Larsen)
Think back over your work and life. What was your “best job ever”? What qualities stand out to you as you relive it? And what do you think made that possible?

More and more, software developers come to know Agile as a set of practices that deliver an experience you might call “at least my work doesn’t suck so much anymore” - and then don’t know to expect anything more. We can do better than that! In this talk Diana Larsen calls on you to remember the everyday felt experiences of many early Agile teams that learned to love their work again.

Early teams and practitioners focused on Agile as an opportunity to make things better for themselves, their customers, and their business partners - not as a panacea for their problems. They talked about “trust”, “self-organization”, “excellence”, and building teams around “motivated individuals”. This was a starting point, not a fairy-tale ending they were working towards.

Diana reminds us how to reclaim our goal of reaching for and achieving our “best jobs ever”, by protecting those practices and attitudes that create them wherever we experienced them in life, in or out of Agile.

How do you make your current team experience the benchmark for all future work? No matter who you are, or where you work - there’s room for more love for work on your team - let’s discover it together.
 

Speakers
avatar for Diana Larsen

Diana Larsen

FutureWorks Consulting LLC


Wednesday July 30, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sun Ballroom

10:15

Conference AM Break
Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:15 - 10:45
Sun Lobby/Osceola Lobby

10:45

Mob Programming: A Whole Team Approach (Woody Zuill)
Limited Capacity filling up

Mob Programming is a development approach where the whole team works on the same thing, at the same time, in the same space, and at the same computer. The Whole Team works together to do almost all the work the team does - including coding, designing, testing, and working with the customer (partner, Product Owner, user, etc). We have expanded the "team" nature of all the work we do, not just the planning, retrospectives, and daily stand-up or other meetings, but all the work that the team does.



In other words, this is an evolutionary step to Agile concepts such as pair programming, face-to-face communication, team alignment, collaboration, and "self organizing team".



Although we presented this as a talk at Agile 2013, I'd like to submit this as an Experience Report to document and publish the things we have learned in almost 3 years of development efforts and delivery of high value, high quality software.



I'll share:

* What it looks like

* The results we've had

* Some unexpected benefits we've found

* Why we think it has worked so well for us

* A few practices we find particularly useful

Speakers
avatar for Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill

Application Development Manager, Hunter Industries
I've been a software developer for 30+ years, and I'm an Agile enthusiast. I work as an Agile Coach with the original "Mob Programming" team, and have been instrumental highlighting "No Estimates" concepts. | | I've enjoy sharing my Agile experiences, and learning new things. If you are ever in the San Diego area please stop by and "Mob" with us. | | I maintain and write for both the http://mobprogramming.org website, and my own blog at... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 11:15
Daytona

10:45

Helping to change organisational culture (Matthew Hodgson)
Limited Capacity full

The State of Agile survey continues to report that company philosophy and culture is killing our agile projects. Coupled with broader organisational and communications problems, cultural transition and unwillingness from team members to embrace agile, many people struggle to know what to do to help change others' minds about the benefits of agile and adopt its processes.



How can coaches and managers affect change in organisational culture? What do they need to know to create long-lived agile values and behaviours in individuals and teams that promotes and sustains an enterprise agile culture?



In this workshop, participants will work in groups and be led through a **Problem-Based Learning approach** to articulate their issues in changing culture. Matthew will then lead the group step-by-step through a number of psychological theories and applications, based on problems from case studies, and ask participants to then identify the root cause of their issues, come up with ideas to address them, and then share them with others in the workshop.



By applying a problem-based learning approach, participants will create domain knowledge in psychology, specifically designed to:



* Identify the type of organisational culture

* Understand culture through the output of individuals’ behaviour

* Understand the behaviour of individuals and teams in terms of Power Theory, Group Dynamics

* Describe change as a series of stages and identify the stage of change of individuals and teams

* Create long-lived agile behaviours over pushing adherence to process

* Address difficult behaviour in team members

* Encourage teams to become ‘high performers’

Presentation can be found at: http://zenexmachina.wordpress.com/2014/07/09/agile-adoption-helping-to-change-organisational-culture/


Speakers
avatar for Matthew Hodgson

Matthew Hodgson

Lead Partner for Enterprise Agile Transformation, Zen Ex Machina
Matthew has been using psychology to further ICT cultural change goals for 20 years. He is a contributing author to the books 'The Emergence of the Relationship Economy' and 'The Psychology of Aid' and continues to publish in international journals in the fields of psychology on the pragmatic aspects of learning, change, teamwork and motivation. | | As an agile coach, Matthew applies techniques from his background in psych and 20 years of... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sarasota

10:45

Agile Software Development: Software Change (Vaclav Rajlich, christopher dorman)
Limited Capacity filling up

Writing code on an agile project is based on principles like simple design; ever wonder why you don't have a process to write code that embraces these principles?

This session will explain the best practices of software change. It will refresh and reinvigorate those that write code and open the doors to the development process to those who work with developers everyday. You will learn how to change large applications quickly with a of minimum risk and only as-needed knowledge of the code and project domain.

Examples of the developer practices related to software change include ***feature location*** that locates the place in the existing code where a new feature is to be implemented, ***impact analysis*** that assesses how much the old code is going to be impacted if a new feature is added to it, ***refactoring*** that either prepares the code for the change or cleans up the aftermath, change propagation that traces where the secondary changes are to be made, verification that confirms both the new and the old code, and so forth. These practices are summarized in a ***phased model of software change.*** Hands-on examples will allow the participants to practice these topics.


Speakers
CD

christopher dorman

n/a, wayne state university
avatar for Vaclav  Rajlich

Vaclav Rajlich

Professor, Wayne State University
Vaclav Rajlich focuses his research on software development. His papers deal with staged model of software lifespan, Agile development, software change processes and techniques, and similar topics. He published book "Software engineering: The current practice", CRC Press, 2012. He also published approximately 90 peer-reviewed papers, including papers in Agile conference.



Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sanibel

10:45

Mutation Test - A New Way to Improve Code and Test (Joseph Yao)
Limited Capacity seats available

Mutation test is a way to put a "mutation" into your code, run the test and then see if the test fails or not. A mutation is a change to production code which should make it behave in a different way. The idea is, if the production code is just enough to pass the test, any mutation should make the test failed due to the behaviour change. If test failure doesn't happen, we will say that the test can't kill this mutation. Therefore, some test code smell or production code smell exists, which possibly leads to some learning and improvement of our code and test.

By TDD, we should get "just enough" code that passing all the test. But, how do we know this? Sometimes, since writing test and code is so interactive in TDD, we may not choose the smallest baby step to pass the test. This means we may write some code which is not driven by current test (code smell). On the other side, we may even miss some important test or create some “weak” test by TDD because the code is too “obvious" to us (test smell). By applying Mutation test mindset and methodology, we can identify such code smell and test smell and then help us improve the quality of our code and test.

In this topic, I will first introduce what mutation test is and why we can use it to create some learning of and improve our code and test. Then, I will share a real code example in which I tried the mutation test and some learning I got. Finally, based on what I learned so far, I will have a summarisation about the code smell and test smell which can be detected by mutation test.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Yao

Joseph Yao

Agile Coach, Odd-e
Joseph is an Odd-e Agile Coach and provides agile practice coaching and training for teams. He has more than 13 years’ development and project management experience in software industry, as well as, a broad knowledge in both internet (web & app) and desktop software development. He is an active player and contributor of agile community in China. As a software craftsman, he has been playing coding kata daily since 2011. Meanwhile, he has been... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Miami

10:45

Enterprise Agile? Are You Ready? (Scott Ambler)
Limited Capacity full

An agile enterprise increases value through effective execution and delivery in a timely and reactive manner. Such organizations do this by streamlining the flow of information, ideas, decision making, and work throughout the overall business process all the while improving the quality of the process and business outcomes. Unfortunately most organizations run into what seems to be insurmountable roadblocks to becoming truly agile: bureaucratic cultures; differing IT and business goals; short term investment horizons; inflexible governance; and little support for learning and experimentation to name a few.



This talk describes, step-by-step, how several organizations are evolving from today’s vision of agile software development to become truly agile enterprises. It briefly examines the state of mainstream agile software development and argues for the need for a more disciplined approach to agile delivery that provides a solid foundation from which to scale. It then explores what it means to scale agile strategies at the project/product level and across your IT organization as a whole. Your agile IT strategy, along with a lean business strategy, are key enablers of a full-fledged agile enterprise. Lessons learned from several disparate organizations, each of which at different stages of their agile transformations will be shared. Their experiences overcoming the challenges that they faced, and insights regarding alternative strategies they should have considered in hindsight, will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Scott Ambler + Associates
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational level. Scott is the founder of the Agile Modeling (AM), Agile Data (AD), Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD), and Enterprise Unified Process (EUP) methodologies. He... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola A

10:45

SAFe Yourself from FrankenAgileMetrics (Larry Maccherone)
Limited Capacity full

There’s a monster out there!

If you roll out large-scaled agile metrics the wrong way, it can be a monster, raggedly sewn together from different, incompatible mindsets. It may be able to breathe — and maybe even walk — but don’t be surprised when you find your business being choked to death by it.

With a visual and a presentation style that tips the hat to a classic horror story, you’ll learn about SAFe metrics that make sense and make a difference in your business.

Bringing the creature to life (i.e., The Genius of SAFe and The Problem)

SAFe provides a clear, easy-to-follow map for scaling your agile process. Even though SAFe covers metrics in the M1-M8 specification, that isn’t its primary mission. So the specification is neither as broad nor as deep enough to have a truly successful understanding of what’s going on — and what to do about it.

Moreover, much of the information on the SAFe metrics page is admittedly just examples. Some of it doesn’t go very far in-depth, mostly just providing suggestions of things you might want to look at further.

Keep it from destroying the town (The Solution)

In this talk you'll see fully fleshed out visualizations complete with calculations and noise filtering capability that will show you the "What?” (see below). More importantly, it includes references to trends, benchmarking, indicators, and analysis that allows you to also answer the "So what?" and even the "Now what?"

Meet the townspeople (The Examples)

The examples you’ll see are not theoretical. They come from roughly 30 organizations using various parts of this framework. We'll talk about their experiences, the struggles they had and how the framework we're discussing successfully deals with those difficulties.

What? (The Science)

Metrics are inherently about the “What.” What is our current sprint velocity? What is our current defect density? What can we predict for the next iteration? And more...

Many of the existing SAFe metrics were chosen based on well-educated best guesses of what might be useful to track rather than what are empirically shown to be the most useful. We studied 120 individual metrics related just to M7 and M8, and found the seven metrics that were the most useful by best illuminating the dimensions that M7 and M8 are attempting to track.

So What? Now What? (The Moral)

In order to be truly useful in business decisions, metrics must go beyond the “What?” and help you answer the “So What?” and even the “Now What?”

SAFe is clear about the fact that implementing metrics requires "Adult Supervision" if you want to avoid “unintended” behaviors, i.e., the dark side of metrics that comes from gaming and unhealthy internal competition, but doesn’t go into detail about what that is or how to do it. (http://scaledagileframework.com/metrics/).

We extend that idea by including clear guidelines on what is meant by being an “adult” with respect to scaled agile metrics that reinforce your agile culture.

What to expect:



  • Overview of Leffingwell's current SAFe metrics M1-M8



  • Explain the framework (Team, Program, Portfolio/Organization)



  • Propose Rally’s framework similar to SAFe M1-M8, and extending it further



  • Give examples of how to satisfy each


  • What to do and what NOT to do when rolling out metrics at scale in an agile environment
Presentation

Speakers
avatar for Larry Maccherone

Larry Maccherone

Optimizer, AgileCraft
Larry Maccherone is an accomplished author and highly rated speaker who has regularly presented at major international conferences on Lean and Agile. He is very excited to have recently joined AgileCraft where his passion for analytics and visualization is helping AgileCraft be the best way to scale Agile. Prior to that, he led the Insights product line at Rally Software. His core area of expertise is drawing interesting insights from data... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 4

10:45

And Now for Something Completely Different: Monty Python’s Agile Leadership (George Dinwiddie, Nathaniel Cadwell)
Limited Capacity filling up

You don't have to know Monty Python to understand leadership, but it helps. The pioneering comedy troupe’s surreal and satirical work held a mirror up to society reflecting how individuals, groups, organizations, and societies function. While delivered humorously, there are many keen insights and lessons for the Agile leader who aspires to create an environment in which people become empowered.



This session combines select audio and visual from the Python’s body of work with observations and analysis from the speaker’s experience as: Agile leaders, coaches, and consultants to examine patterns and anti-patterns in the following areas:



- Leader’s Approach to Failure and Blame

- The Importance of Communicating Effectively

- Focusing on Outcomes over Activities

- Command and Control vs. Participatory / Democratic Leadership Styles

- The Reluctant or Emergent Leader

- Fostering Individual Agency and Group Self Organization

- Avoiding Organizational Orthodoxy and Ossification



This interactive session also asks attendees to share their experience regarding these topics and reflection on the material presented. And yes, it may get a bit silly.

Speakers
NC

Nathaniel Cadwell

Agile Coach and Consultant, LiftHand
Nathaniel Cadwell has over fifteen years of consulting experience in: software development, agile enablement, and change management. Over the course of his career, he has helped organizations achieve dramatic improvement in their software delivery. In his current role, Nathaniel is an agile coach helping individuals, teams, and organizations on their path to agility. His experience spans from large multi-team engagements with Fortune 50... Read More →
avatar for George Dinwiddie

George Dinwiddie

Software Development Coach, iDIA Computing
George Dinwiddie helps organizations develop software more effectively. He brings thirty-five years of development experience from electronic hardware and embedded firmware to business information technology. He helps organizations, managers, and teams solve the problems they face by providing consulting, coaching, mentoring and training at the organizational, process, team, interpersonal, and technical levels. Involved in the Agile community... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola B

10:45

The Self-Selecting Organisation - Standing on the Shoulders of Giants (Sandy Mamoli, David Mole)
Limited Capacity filling up

Inspired by Spotify's squads (cross functional teams running as mini learn-startups) and Atlassian's Fedex day (deliver within 24 hours) we let 90 people choose what they wanted to work on and who they wanted to work with. Through telling the story of Trade Me, New Zealand's biggest ecommerce platform, we will demonstrate how good leadership can inspire and empower people using a scalable self-selection process along with a vision for an exciting picture of the future.



Flying in the face of conventional wisdom and traditional management practices a middle manager and an Agile coach didn't ask for permission, and removed significant obstacles and constraints to successfully form 18 self-chosen, fully skilled squads.



In this session we will show how we facilitated self-organisation on a scale we don't believe has been done before, what we had to go through to convince people that this was a good idea, how we learned how to visualise the process and dealt with brilliant people as well as a few difficult people!



We will describe how we had the exciting opportunity to observe and partake in a social experiment where people made decisions on the fly and stayed true to our values of being trusted, straight up and to grow great people.



All Agile teams self-organise but we took the principles to a whole other level and created the self-organising organisation.

Speakers
avatar for Sandy Mamoli

Sandy Mamoli

Director of All Things Agile, Nomad8
Sandy Mamoli é consultora Ágil na Nomad8, com ênfase em cultura e liderança. Trabalhou em Amsterdam e Copenhagen para se tornar uma das principais Coaches da Nova Zelândia, ela compartilha o seu talento prático e uma paixão para advogar em nome da Agilidade para negócios ao redor do mundo. Sandy é ex-atleta olímpica, geek, viciada em gadgets e palestrante internacional... Read More →
avatar for David Mole

David Mole

Head of Agile, Trade Me
After several years in the Gamblinging industry in the UK and Gibraltar, I moved to the other side of the world for no other reason than adventure and new experience. I often lose at football, win at Poker and injure myself at sports. I’m very lucky to work with some very cool people at Trade Me in New Zealand


Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Tampa

10:45

Who killed Agile? (Dhaval Panchal)
Limited Capacity seats available

What happened to the promise of continuous improvement? When did your passion for developing products turn in lawyering about processes and forcing tools? If you are passionate about avoiding common Agile transformation pitfalls and learn about focusing on signals vs. noise, this interactive and fun session is for you. In this workshop you will work in small teams. You will be presented with clues where you will have to discover root-cause(s) for death of Agile spirit. We will provide you with simple tools to process these clues and help you devise an action plan to resuscitate Agile.

Speakers
DP

Dhaval Panchal

SolutionsIQ
CSC, CST


Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Naples

10:45

Building Learning into Team Life (Rachel Davies)
Limited Capacity full

When we make time and space for learning within teams, the products and services we build benefit from new ideas and innovative solutions. Team members also tend to find work more satisfying and enjoyable, which helps company recruitment and staff retention. Many managers and coaches/scrum masters struggle when it comes to practical ways to encourage people to keep learning at work. It can help to build in time for learning, exploration and discovery into team/organization process but how can you get started? Perhaps more challenging, how can you keep learning initiatives going without taking on the admin yourself?

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Davies

Rachel Davies

Agile Coach, Unruly
Rachel Davies coaches product development teams at Unruly (tech.unruly.co)  in London. She is co-author of “Agile Coaching” and an invited speaker  at industry events around the globe. Her mission is to create workplaces where  developers enjoy delivering valuable software. Rachel is a strong  advocate of XP approaches and an organiser of Extreme  Programmers London meet-up. Follow her @rachelcdavies on... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Gainesville

10:45

Beyond Adherence to Specification, Use Testing to Improve Business Outcomes (David Bulkin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile testing can drive clarity and test adherence to specification, which is good, but come to this session to *find out how agile testing can help us create better business cases* and deliver our targeted outcomes.



Our workshop will be hands on. You will find out how to use specification by example (ATDD and BDD) to ensure that stakeholders are on the same conceptual page, developers build what the business really wants, and testers can prove it.



You will then go further, as we build on the concepts, in a slightly different fashion, to improve our business rules and test our business outcomes so that we get better results, using Hypothesis Driven Development (HDD).



This is a hands-on, practical, technology agnostic session, so come with pen, paper and a readiness to learn by doing, then go back to work and make your project successful!


Speakers
DB

David Bulkin

VP and Head of Training Services, LitheSpeed
David Bulkin is a VP and Head of Training Services at LitheSpeed, where he delivers training and coaching to clients in North America, Australia, India, Europe and Africa. David is a part time agile editor at InfoQ, and co-founder of the Agile Leadership Network of NJ. David has 30 years experience delivering software and systems and has been applying agile methods for 10+ years across the entire value stream from strategy and product ideation to... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sun D

10:45

Creating Successful MVPs in Agile Teams (Melissa Perri)
Limited Capacity full

Traditionally, products are designed focusing on the features of the product, and not solving problems for the customers. There is usually little validation before work begins, and teams end up wasting time building a product that no one wants. To create great products, we need to move the focus from building to learning about our customers. Teams who implement Minimum Viable Products (MVPs) learn more about customers, waste less time, and deliver usable solutions faster. But, setting up an MVP wrong can deliver false results.



In this session, we'll focus on the fundamentals of creating an effective MVP experiment: defining effective problem and customer hypotheses, listing your assumptions and picking the riskiest one, and determining which experiment to run. We'll discuss the differences between Lean MVPs and Agile MVPs , and the pros and cons to each.



This talk is geared towards developers, scrum masters, UX designers, and product managers.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Perri

Melissa Perri

Founder & Principal Consultant, ProdUX Labs
Melissa Perri is the founder and principal consultant of ProdUX Labs (produxlabs.com). She is a teacher and speaker on Product Management, using her experience to help companies find the best ways to work. Before founding her previous venture FlowsBy, Melissa was a Product Manager and UX Designer at startups in NYC. She also teaches Product Management at General Assembly, and runs workshops on Product Management for companies and startup... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 1/2

10:45

Discover Your Product’s Quality Attributes Before They Discover You (Ellen Gottesdiener, Nanette Brown)
Limited Capacity seats available

Quality attributes, such as performance, usability, robustness, and more, are essential for customer satisfaction and can often have a significant impact on technology selection and design. However, quality attributes are challenging for customers to articulate and are notoriously difficult to elicit. They lurk below the level of user consciousness as unspoken expectations or sometimes as unanticipated delighters. User stories, the most common way for agile teams to identify user requirements, don’t directly accommodate quality attributes. Consequently quality attributes are often forgotten or ignored until they waylay teams in later delivery cycles, causing user dissatisfaction, deferred value and unnecessary rework.



In this workshop, we explore techniques that engage customers and technical people alike in proactively uncovering these crucial requirements. You will learn how to integrate quality attributes into your requirements discovery practices using all of the product dimensions. [These dimensions](http://www.discovertodeliver.com/image/data/Resources/visuals/DtoD-7-Product-Dimensions.pdf) include user role and action (which are articulated in user stories) and they also incorporate less commonly considered aspects of your product--interface, data, control and environment.



You will see how to uncover quality attributes by exploring both functional and nonfunctional dimensions of product requirements. We will discuss specification techniques to ensure that quality attributes requirements are comprehensible and testable. You will learn how to promote quality attributes from afterthought to first-class citizens in the world of agile requirements.



Quality attributes can be discovered—if you know how and where to look. Join Ellen and Nanette in a fast-paced survey of key practices to help you elicit and specify quality attributes on your agile project so you can holistically determine and specify product needs.

Speakers
NB

Nanette Brown

Senior Associate, EBG Consulting
avatar for Ellen Gottesdiener

Ellen Gottesdiener

CEO/Founder, EBG Consulting
Ellen Gottesdiener is an internationally recognized leader in the convergence of agile + requirements + product management and a pioneer in the use of collaborative practices for product discovery. She offers techniques, tools, training, and leadership in how you can engage in ways that excite, invite, and produce valuable product outcomes and happy teams. | | Ellen is a world-renowned writer, speaker, and presenter. Her most recent book... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sun C

10:45

See the Value (Jeffrey Morgan, Ardita Karaj)
Limited Capacity full

Many Agile teams focus on Velocity as their measure of progress. They build burn-up charts to track it over time and make it the focus of much of their discussion during Sprint Planning and Retrospectives. Is the strong focus on this metric truly in line with the principles of Agile Software Development?



Join Cheezy and Ardita as they lead us through a hands on workshop to explore this question. In this workshop you will discover how a focus on Value first, instead of Velocity, changes how the team approaches the work to be completed. Through a series of structured activities you will work with a Story Map for a fictitious project and assign value to the discovered stories. You will learn the practices and skills necessary to track Earned Value on your project and also learn the valuable lesson on how to discover what not to build. The outcome will be a set of new skills that you can take back with you and immediately apply to your current team development planning efforts. This session will be fun and educational. This is one workshop you don't want to miss.

Speakers
avatar for Ardita Karaj

Ardita Karaj

Agile Coach, EPAM Canada
Ardita is a passionate Agile coach, trainer, change agent and consultant in the Toronto area. She brings more than 15 years of software development experience from different commercial and public organizations. Over the past few years her focus has been on process improvement for organizations that are adopting Agile frameworks like Scrum and Kanban. Working with both management and development teams, she is well known for applying Agile and Lean... Read More →
avatar for Jeff

Jeff "Cheezy" Morgan

CTO / Agile Coach, LeanDog
Cheezy is an international speaker and keynote presenter in different Agile conferences. He has spoken 6 times at the Agile 20XX conferences as well as other ones like Agile development East and West, Mile High Agile, Agile and Beyond, Path to Agility, etc.



Wednesday July 30, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 3

11:30

Distributed Team Technology For Co-Located Teams (Daniel Markham)
Limited Capacity full

As a coach, in the field I'm starting to see a new trend: the use of distributed tools in co-located teams. In this session I'll demo and show the unexpected benefits many distributed tools can give to co-located teams. I'll show how to use Hangouts to have better Sprint Demos, Trello for more responsive physical storyboards, a Google Docs for collaborative editing, Lucid Charts for diagramming, and G+ communities as shared team areas.



Not all of these efforts are successful, though, and I'll tell you how other teams failed and what to look for if you try these in your own teams.

Speakers
DM

Daniel Markham

Bedford Technology Group
Hands-on technologist, speaker, writer, and coach. Experience with lots of different teams in many diverse situations. Author of "ScrumMaster" and "Backlogs"



Wednesday July 30, 2014 11:30 - 12:00
Daytona

12:00

Conference Lunch
Wednesday July 30, 2014 12:00 - 14:00
Osceola ABCD

12:00

Exhibits OPEN
Wednesday July 30, 2014 12:00 - 15:45
Osceola ABCD

12:00

Exhibits OPEN
Wednesday July 30, 2014 12:00 - 15:45
Osceola ABCD

14:00

Useful Metrics in a Complex World: Revealing the underlying story of your system (Ken Power)
Limited Capacity full

A smooth end-to-end flow of work through the system is a goal for teams and organizations, yet remains difficult or unachievable for many. Teams and organizations attempting to implement a smooth flow face many impediments. This session, and associated experience report, presents a useful set of metrics that reveal how work is flowing through your system. The right metrics tell a story about what is going on in the system. Drawing from my experiences working with Cisco teams around the world, this session will take you on a short tour of six metrics: cumulative flow, throughput analysis, cycle time, lead time, burn up, and velocity trend. Reflecting hard-won experience, this core set of metrics has evolved in our practice over the years to become a useful aid in identifying potential trouble spots or impediments in the system. The session and paper will also describe some challenges associated with these chosen metrics, and some other metrics that did not work out for us. The session and paper will provide practical advice on how to visualize and interpret the metrics, how they relate to each other, how they influence behaviour and decision-making, and how you can use them to see the underlying patterns and stories in your system.

Speakers
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Principal Engineer, Cisco Systems, Inc.
Ken is a Principal Engineer and internal coach and consultant with Cisco Systems, Inc. He lives in Galway, Ireland and works with teams and organizations around the world. His responsibilities include leading the agile transformation for Ciscos largest software group. He also works with universities and research groups in agile, lean and software engineering research. He is currently completing a PhD in Lean Flow and understanding impediments... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 14:30
Daytona

14:00

The Agile BA (Ken Howard)
Limited Capacity full

While SCRUM avoids role labels such as Business Analyst (BA), the career BA often plays a critical role in the success of agile project teams. There are different opinions on how a BA can best contribute to a team, including repurposing the role into Product Owner. Many agile teams write stories and rely completely on conversations about those stories for elaboration. This can be problematic when building complex systems. Often, underlying business rules are difficult to communicate clearly and accurately, and a bridge is needed between the story and acceptance criteria. Additionally, understanding team members’ different learning styles can help determine the best practices for describing requirements on a team.



This session will provide a description of key skills and tools that skillful BA’s often use. These will be aligned with the approach used in typical agile software development methods such as Scrum and Kanban, and best practices for maximizing the value of your BA will be offered. Participants will complete a VARK learning style assessment and learn requirements elaboration practices that are best suited to each learning style.




Speakers
avatar for Ken Howard

Ken Howard

Vice President, Improving Enterprises
Ken Howard is Vice President at Improving Enterprises and has been involved in most aspects of software development for over 28 years with such languages as diverse as COBOL, Smalltalk and Java. Over the years Ken has provided consulting, training and mentoring to companies in 12 countries around the world, helping with adoption of software development best practices. He is also on the adjunct computer science faculty at SMU’s Lyle School of... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Tallahassee

14:00

Lambda the eXtreme: test-driving a functional language (Tim Myer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Functional languages like Scala can reduce the complexity of writing high-concurrency, high-throughput systems, but growing software with TDD in Scala presents challenges unfamiliar to those of us who spend most of our time in the JavaScript, Java and .NET worlds. Learn how to avoid the pitfalls of testing a functional language and walk away with some new techniques that you can apply to development in other languages, even if you have never written software using Scala before.



Suppose your team has decided to use Scala for a performance-critical component in your backend system that will need to scale to millions of concurrent users. A couple of days into the project you are finding that in Scala, there are few easy wins, and as the codebase grows, your confidence in it shrinks. You are comfortable with ATDD, TDD and emergent architecture in the development ecosystems of .NET and Java, but are unsure of the best way to introduce those disciplines to your team along with the conventions of Scala.



Together, we will explore the various testing DSLs available in Scala for elegantly specifying your intent and cultivating your design through tests. We will examine which frameworks to use for testing interactions with an existing Actor-based library, and how to drive the development with tests for a system that relies on reactive programming.



We will start with an empty programming canvas, and by the end of this session, attendees will have been immersed in the process of writing a fully-functional Dropbox client that incorporates the ScalaTest, Scalaz, Akka and Spray libraries.



The techniques are taught in the context of Scala but can be applied to other Actor-based frameworks in functional languages like Erlang or Haskell.


Speakers
TM

Tim Myer

Programmer, SolutionsIQ
Tim Myer is an XP coach and programmer at SolutionsIQ, a leading provider of Agile transformation services, who takes a real-world approach to delivering Agile at scale. | He has been practicing and coaching TDD and ATDD in various software development ecosystems for the last 8 years, 6 of them as a consultant at SolutionsIQ. He has also been a member of team WIKISPEED for the past 2 years, where he was able to put hardware TDD into practice and... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Tampa

14:00

What Can Journalists Teach Developers About Writing Source Code? (Alistair McKinnell)
Limited Capacity filling up

Programs today are more complicated than ever. Overwhelming detail threatens to prevent developers from writing code that can be understood and safely changed. Exactly how to organize all this detail is a significant challenge. Luckily there is something that developers can learn from journalists.



The Inverted Pyramid is a writing style that journalists use to organize the details in newspaper articles. It provides two important benefits for readers. First, readers can leave an article at any point and understand it, even if they do not have all the details. Second, for those readers who wish to proceed, it conducts them through the article details.



Come to this session and you'll learn how to write source code that provides your readers with these same detail taming benefits.

Speakers
avatar for Alistair McKinnell

Alistair McKinnell

Software Architect, Nulogy
Alistair has been writing software since the days of punch cards. After reading Kent Beck's Extreme Programming Explained he realized he had found his tribe.



Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 3

14:00

Lost in Translation: Devops (Kevin Behr)
Limited Capacity full

When we hear about DevOps these days, it is usually immediately followed by terms like, automation, testing, deployment. These are the tools, processes and artifacts that teams use to transform their organizations, but what are the underlying fundamental principles behind effective DevOps?



In our haste to adopt these ideas, have we lost track of these underlying principles and assumptions that ground DevOps? In order to effectively apply the fundamentals, we need to make explicit these assumptions, and reasonably bound the applicability of the methods and processes we use.



This exploratory discussion invites participants to explore, reground and bound the applicability of DevOps by investigating the ideas of flow. We’ll compare and contrast the ideas of the foundational flow thinkers, Henry Ford and Taiichi Ohno, in order to illuminate these principles and show how changing contexts inform and shape assumptions about systemic organizational design.

Speakers
KB

Kevin Behr

Chief Science Officer, Praxis Flow
Kevin Behr is the founder of the Information Technology Process Institute (ITPI) and the Chief Science Officer for the CXO and Board Advisory Practice at Praxis Flow, where Kevin has built a unique consulting practice that mentors and coaches CXOs in order to increase their business effectiveness and competitive advantage. | | As a trusted mentor and advisor to chief executive officers and chief information and technology officers around the... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Naples

14:00

Netflix Organizational Structure: Freedom, Responsibility, Impact, and Agility (Roy Rapoport)
Limited Capacity full

# Introduction: Priorities



What's important to us? What are we trying to optimize for?



# Operations: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the O Word



## Operations: What Is It Good For?



If you're thinking operations is about continuous delivery and production,

you're thinking too small. Operations are "A process or series of acts

involved in a particular form of work" -- it's everything your company does to

actually make money or accomplish its mission, and it includes things like how

you develop code. Looking at operations holistically means you can (and SHOULD)

stop being afraid of the O Word.



## Operations Engineering



Every company spends some effort and resources on engineering the way it

performs its operations. Whether you want to think of this as a first-class

discipline or not, you will do this -- but if you don't think about Operations

Engineering you're likely to do it less well. What do we think of as

Operations Engineering? How does this tie into Operational Excellence

principles? How does this actually manifest as the Operations Engineering group

at Netflix?



# Hierarchy and Velocity



## Cross-functional teams



Hierarchy is to a great degree irrelevant at Netflix because engineers are

encouraged to work directly with engineers in other groups to get their work

done. This work is not approved, negotiated, or mediated by managers.



### Examples



* We'll discuss the creation of Python as a first-class language in the Netflix cloud environment as an unsanctioned project championed by one engineer and supported by other engineers with no need for management support;

* We'll discuss Scryer, our Predictive Auto-Scaling Engine, its creation as a cross-functional collaboration between two engineers, and ongoing work on it;



## That Sounds Perfect!



Perhaps we should talk about the downsides, then:



* It's more important to us that engineers are empowered to make decisions than that they consistently make the right decision. This means the threshold for intervention by a manager is typically high. Engineers SHOULD make more mistakes, because they should make many more decisions than in most environments. This has to be acceptable;

* Because a technology may be developed in any organization that wants to develop it, it may not be developed in the organization which would do it most efficiently; as a result, it'll be more costly or take more time to develop than it would have otherwise.



We'll also share examples of both of these.


Speakers
RR

Roy Rapoport

Manager, Insight Engineering, Netflix, Inc
I've spent my more than twenty years of experience in technology in a wide variety of disciplines, from UNIX systems engineering to network architecture and implementation, software development and software testing and release management. I've got a passion for leading highly effective, highly-motivated teams, and the technical background and acumen to pitch in and be hands-on. I code for fun. I'm a master of no trade, but have a keen holistic... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 5/6

14:00

Doomed to Fail: Why the enterprise needs to stop writing checks that can’t be cashed (Jeffrey Davidson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Departments and teams are told what to deliver and when it will be done. They are there to meet the expectations set upon them (including those they haven’t yet been told about). Unfortunately, they often miss their deliverables and it’s getting in the way of expanding agile across the enterprise. Is it any wonder why some agile implementations struggle? The existing culture sets us up for failure!



It does not have to be this way. The problem isn’t your lack of control over other work groups, it is how they are treated. There are big differences between what a group promises to deliver and when they are volun-told to deliver. Every one is committed at some level, so stop treating other groups like chickens.



Using interactive exercises, we will demonstrate common situations and discuss how these problems look from multiple sides. Additionally, we will discuss the tools needed to deal with others who have a low reputation and what it takes to improve your own track-record.



Come to “Doomed to Fail” and learn how to recognize critical difference between prescriptive processes and managing promises between different groups in an organization. Learn how to ask for explicit promises so you can navigate through the enterprise maze to success.



Aside... If you're really curious, we're taking the concept of [Promise Theory](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Promise_theory) and applying it to anti-patterns for enterprise-wide agile.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Davidson

Jeffrey Davidson

Principal, Leading Great Teams
Jeffrey Davidson helps teams uncover their greatness. It’s there already, but too often hiding. Using a combination of stories, engagement, and activities, Jeffrey lays the groundwork for lasting change in leaders and teams; building models of execution and cooperation, guiding world-class teams into the #futureofwork.


Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sun C

14:00

How Sustainable is 'Agile' at the Enterprise Level ? (Ahmed Sidky)
Limited Capacity seats available

As many organizations are adopting more agile and scaling it, a key question is emerging … how sustainable is agile in our organizations – especially at an Enterprise level? From my experience of leading Agile Transformations in three Fortune 100 companies (over 2000 people per transformation), the sustainability of Agile is deeply linked to how the organization “transforms” to agile. We know that transforming an organization to become more agile requires more than just process change. Rather, it requires a complete culture shift. How to affect that culture shift, and make it sustainable, is the key question we will discuss in the session.



We will present two different common transformation approaches (organizational-led and process-led) and then describe a hybrid version called culture-led transformation that is the power of “Keystone habits” to set off a chain of internal events, paving the way for the organization to form other habits, and eventually transform completely. After explaining what Keystone Habits are and their power, I talk about 4 suggested keystone habits (from my experience) that can truly transform an organization.

Presentation

Speakers
AS

Ahmed Sidky

Principal Consultant, Sidky Consulting Group
Ahmed Sidky, also known as Dr. Agile, combines over fifteen years of software development experience, with research from his Ph.D. in Agile transformation and agility assessment to guide enterprise agile transformations in Fortune 100 companies, help small to medium companies worldwide realize sustainable organizational agility, and educate people, from CEOs to developers, on the agile mindset and how to create lean high performing teams. As... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola A

14:00

Helping Others Take Ownership of Conflict Resolution (Tricia Broderick)
Limited Capacity full

Healthy conflict helps build stronger teams. This should come of little surprise. Yet, leaders are all too familiar with the struggle to get members of your team to take ownership of resolving their conflict. I certainly faced this challenge until I started leveraging people’s curiosity. Obviously, each conflict situation can be dramatically different. However, underneath most conflict there is often a misalignment between perceptions and intentions. Join me as we step together through a real world example of priming a person for conflict resolution. Expect deep personal reflection as we explore how immediate reactions can influence perceptions and as leaders how we can encourage others to want to resolve their own conflict. All while, learning techniques that leaders can implement to avoid accidentally or intentionally taking ownership for the conflict.

Speakers


Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sarasota

14:00

Incentivize Us Properly Please – The Game (Jason Tice)
Limited Capacity filling up

You are leading an agile software development team, stories are being completed, business value is being delivered, and all is well. Out of the blue, you get an email from your manager asking for the 3 top performers on your team. You comply with management’s request only to find out that your top 3 performers end up receiving cash merit bonuses at the next all-company meeting in front of all their peers. Next thing you know, team motivation starts to decline, defects become more common, and the team just doesn’t seem as polished as it used to be. As the team lead, you find yourself having to answer management’s questions about what has gone wrong within a team that used to be a top performer. Does any of this sound familiar?



“Incentive Us Properly Please” is a highly interactive simulation that is intended to allow agile team leaders, management, and stakeholders to experience the challenge of creating a proper incentive system to sustain effective and high quality agile software development. During the simulation, participants work in small groups to decide how to allocate a limited number of incentive points between different intrinsic and extrinsic rewards, as the simulation progresses, participants will learn the impacts of their decisions, and gain insight into how to mix different types of incentives to foster enduring motivation. This fully experiential simulation will provide opportunities for participants to brainstorm, share and experiment with their own ideas for rewards and incentives suitable for teams completing knowledge work.



Participants will leave having gained an understanding of the types of incentives that are most beneficial to self-managing agile development teams and perhaps pick up a few innovative and new ideas for incentives that result from collaboration as the game is played.

Speakers
JT

Jason Tice

Vice President of Business Innovation, World Wide Technology



Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 1/2

14:00

Location, Location, Location: The 3 Faces of Environment (Karen Favazza Spencer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Hyper-productive Scrum environments, like kindergarten classrooms, involve the team in an experience that is guided by conscious manipulation of the environment. Using the kindergarten classroom as a metaphor and as a model, learn how you can crank up your team’s experiential learning with Information Radiators, Story Time, and Group Play.



'1. Physical Shared Space - Created with interactive & engaging messages.

'2. Psychological Safe Space - Welcoming and emotionally supportive.

'3. Process Story Space - Game-like structure that effortless communicates role expectations.



Join us to experience the joy of learning from the perspective of the creator of that world.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Favazza Spencer

Karen Favazza Spencer

Agile Coach, Agile Kindergarten
I came to IT project management through a circuitous route that began with Kindergarten Teacher. Since those early days, I have been a Business Manager, Sales Person, Business Analyst, Project Lead, Scrum Master and Agile Coach. Consistent with my constructivist background, my focus is on cognitive psychology, the learning process and decision making. I am certified in Innovation Games which emphasizes collaborative decision making. My recent... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sun D

14:00

Changing your testing mindset (Lisa Crispin) (CANCELLED)
Limited Capacity seats available

On agile teams the focus shifts from finding defects after coding to preventing defects from getting into the code in the first place. Agile team members are also expected to help customers choose the most valuable features to deliver. How can we make the mindset shift and become more agile? (CANCELLED)

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Crispin

Lisa Crispin

tester, Pivotal Labs
Testing! Ask about the books Janet Gregory and I have co-written: _Agile Testing_ and _More Agile Testing_. I always love to talk about donkeys. See http://lisacrispin.com for more about me.


Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Gainesville

14:00

iTest Responsively: Mobile Usability Testing Techniques in an Agile environment (Amber DeRosa, Alicia Hatter)
Limited Capacity filling up

The path ahead and the path we are currently on seem to be focused on mobile.

The growing use of mobile devices has given rise to a new way of responsively

designing websites in an Agile environment. To keep pace with mobile innovation and react to the

changing workflows within our organization, we have adapted our mobile testing

techniques to maximize learnings from every test session. In this talk, we’d

like to share techniques that touch key phases of the mobile usability testing

process, from how we recruit users, to how we experiment with lab configuration, and different remote mobile testing tools we could use to give our business and IT partners what they need for the Agile development process.


Speakers
avatar for Amber DeRosa

Amber DeRosa

Usability Engineer, Vanguard
Amber DeRosa is a Senior Usability Engineer at Vanguard’s corporate headquarters in Malvern, Pennsylvania. She has tested over 150 mobile users across 22 mobile studies, examining native iOS and Android applications as well as responsive websites. To ensure usability tests positively impact the business and our users’ experience, She regularly presents test findings with executive audiences throughout the company. She received a Master’s... Read More →
avatar for Alicia Hatter

Alicia Hatter

Usability Manager, Vanguard
Updated bio: Alicia is the business-to-business usability manager for Vanguard, where she oversees user research and usability activities related to responsive websites and mobile applications. Her team's target audience are financial advisors and institutional investors in both the U.S. and overseas locations where Vanguard has a local presence. She is a 2011 graduate of Clemson University’s Communication Studies and Information Design Ph.D... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola 4

14:00

Cultivating Agile Requirements (Mark Wavle)
Limited Capacity seats available

In an Agile environment, maintaining an ever-changing backlog of requirements can be intimidating, exhausting, and overwhelming. Without a sustainable process to cultivate the backlog, the Agile team can struggle to deliver value to its customers.



In this session, we will:

* Talk about changes that happen to the backlog and why those changes are important

* Identify common stages in the maturity of backlog items

* Discuss why “when” the team does various backlog preparation activities is very important

* Walk through three steps you can use to define a backlog maturity process in your environment

* Determine your goal state

* Identify questions for your backlog items

* Name and define maturity stages

* Propose techniques to make your stages of maturity visible



Come discover how to create an adaptable process to handle constant backlog change and provide valuable information at the right time for your team and stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Wavle

Mark Wavle

Practice Manager, Cardinal Solutions
Mark Wavle is a Scrum Master (PSM II), Business Analyst (CBAP), and trainer with Cardinal Solutions Group who is passionate about enabling the development of quality, valuable solutions. He has 10 years of experience as a Business Analyst in the manufacturing, service, and healthcare industries. | Five years ago, Mark joined an Agile project as a member of a Scrum team, later taking on Scrum Master activities. He has found the approach... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Miami

14:00

Lean Startup Snowflakes (D. Andre Dhondt)
Limited Capacity seats available

Who can run the most profitable business in this simulation? No experience with Lean Startup? No problem--we'll give you what you need to succeed! By the time you leave, you'll be ready to jolt your team's creativity & innovation. Learn how customer empathy can help you build just the right thing, and nothing more. Reduce your workload while astonishing customers with great products! Anyone involved in software or product development will learn the fun way with this game.




Speakers
DA

D. Andre Dhondt

Agile Coach, Rally Software
http://www.about.me/adhondt



Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Sanibel

14:00

Unlock Your True Potential Using Quantitative Business Value (Alexander Brown)
Limited Capacity seats available

Teams that forego a disciplined approach to calculating business value are leaving money on the table. Yet many scrum teams do just that; they measure velocity effectively as a way to improve team productivity over time, but rely on very soft qualitative methods to determine backlog order.



Business value exists at the intersection of what the market wants, what teams can actually implement, and what the organization is passionate about. It should be an explicit Product Owner consideration, determined in a consistent and useful way. Calculating business value quantitatively:

• Eliminates most internal stakeholder disagreements and enables faster, clearer decisions

• Allows the Product Owner to systematically test assumptions about the product, customers and the market to improve value delivery over time

• Enables accurate forecasting of both feature delivery AND value delivery as part of an agile release plan



This session will explain the sources of business value to different organizations, present a spectrum of methods for calculating business value that range from quick and simple to precise and quantitative, discuss how to weigh the tradeoffs between speed vs. rigor in an agile context, demonstrate one method (Net Present Value per point) on the highly-quantitative end of this spectrum, and illustrate the expanded capabilities this quantitative approach provides to the Product Owner.



Participants will be able leave the session and implement many of the methods discussed, or at a minimum use the vision outlined as a tool to move down the spectrum towards a more effective value estimation method.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Brown

Alexander Brown

Chief Product Owner/COO, Scrum Inc.
Alex Brown is the Chief Operating Officer of Scrum Inc. He has deep experience in Agile/Lean management techniques and business strategy. He is actively involved in adapting the Scrum methodology beyond its traditional home in software development into other creative team environments, and has a particular interest in pushing the envelope in financial and progress reporting in a Scrum context. His current research focusses on modular approaches... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:00 - 15:15
Osceola B

14:45

Creole cottage - Constructive Pattern for building a Scrum Master community (Ni Sun)
Limited Capacity full

When walking through the French Quarter in New Orleans, you must be impressed by the historic housing styles Creole cottages. The typical Creole cottage is composed of one Chimney, two gabled windows, two doors and two windows. Comparing with these structural elements of Creole cottage, building a Scrum Master community also needs to take consideration comprehensively about the key elements, such as business goal, purpose, methodology, tools and alignment.



The “Creole Cottage” pattern is abstracted from a real-life experience. It’s a practical and hands on pattern to help building a Scrum Master community while solving company-wide problems to achieve business goal. It can be said to kill three birds with one stone.



The whole session covers the contents below:


1. Background (3 min)


2. “Creole Cottage” pattern introduction (5 min)

3. Real case experience sharing (17 min)

4. Lessons learned and summary (5 min)




Outline:



1. Background (3 min)

The new agile organization is like a newborn baby, weak, fragile, unsustainable, threatened by growing crises. There are big barriers between scrum teams which belong to different business units, resulting in cross-team product delivery being delayed again and again; because of lack of visibility of defect data and standardized processes, complaints happen between the customer service team and development teams, such that the average lead time of live defects is even longer than the release cycle.



On the other hand, the first wave of Scrum Masters is brand new, and there is a need to build a community to grow Scrum Masters from both knowledge and a practice point of view.

As an Agile Coach, also a newcomer in a new agile-transformed company, I was given a mission to create a Scrum Master community as well as solving company-wide problems.



2. “Creole Cottage” Pattern Introduction (5 min)



A Creole cottage is a type of vernacular architecture in Gulf Coast of the United States. You can see a lot of Creole cottages in New Orleans.



Comparing the structure of a Creole cottage to building a Scrum Master community, we should take consideration of all the structural elements. The two gabled windows on the roof serve two purposes: one is to grow the Scrum Master’s agile competence, and another is to solve the company-wide problems. The chimney is the organization’s goal, giving us the business direction. The foundation of the cottage is the company’s foundation: people, organization gene, processes, the ways of working, etc. Just like how building the cottage’s foundation is important, the most essential thing to building a Scrum Master community is to create fundamental alignment. That means abstracting common interests from different departments and different roles. That’s where we start.



After we have the business goal and understanding the existing situation, the next thing to do is to close the gap – build the cottage walls. Just like the two doors of the Creole cottage, here we use two fantastic tools: Scrum and Deming Improvement Cycle PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Act). We use Scrum methodology to develop two continuous improvement projects: one is cross-team collaboration enhancement, and the other is defect flow improvement. They are the Creole Cottage’s two windows.



Key Elements of the “Creole Cottage” pattern
:

1) Chimney: Business Goal


2) Left gabled window: Grow Scrum Master agile competence


3) Right gabled window: Solve company-wide problems


4) Foundation: Alignment among Product Owner, Customer Relations, Development Team, Management Team and Core Technology Team


5) Left door: Scrum methodology


6) Right door: Deming improvement cycle (PDCA)

7) Left window: cross-team collaboration enhancement


8) Right window: defect flow improvement



3. Real case experience sharing and analysis (17 min)





3.1 Background
After I joined EF Labs as an Agile Coach, my manager Eric Azumi, Vice President of EF Labs, told me his vision is to create continuous improvement culture within the organization. He gave me a mission: Create a Scrum Master community while solving our top company-wide problems. In the company’s yearly offsite meeting, our CEO, Bill Fisher, emphasized two business goals: to reduce product defects and to break down team barriers.

After getting the goal and the business direction (the cottage chimney), I started to build the cottage foundation: to understand the existing situation by discussing with all counterparts (Technical Development Managers, Scrum Masters, Product Owners, QA Manager, Organization Designer, Developers, QAs, etc). After the kickoff meeting, we started to build the cottage’s two windows – the two continuous improvement projects: Product Defect Flow Improvement and Cross-Team Collaboration Enhancement.



3.2 How – Build cottage windows by using two tools: Scrum and PDCA cycle (two cottage doors)




I acted as the Product Owner for the two projects. All ten Scrum Masters acted as developers, dividing into two teams.



Each team focused on one project. The whole procedure was organized according to the steps below:

a. Deep understanding of the current situation.

b. 
Root Cause Analysis for current problems by using cause-effect diagram
.

c. Project setup: Start PDCA cycle.

d. Generate prioritized project backlog: every action is one backlog item.

e. Use three sprints to implement the backlog items.

f. 
Weekly meet-up, inspect and adapt every sprint.

g. 
Product demo to the whole company



3.3 Output


Project 1: Product Defect Flow Improvement


a. Standardized live defect process, definition of roles and responsibilities.

b. Defcon system (defect severity calculation system)
.

c. Live defect reports in JIRA defect management system.



Project 2: Cross-Team Collaboration Enhancement


a. Cross-team project workflow.

b. 
Team Portal (electronic seat map, each scrum team’s workflow and structure).

c. Agile Salon and Agile games.

d. 
Badminton rallies



3.4 Results:




After making product defect data transparent, we solved many long-open defects. Average defect lead-time has been reduced. There is more effective communication between customer relation teams and scrum teams. The defect fix flow is more efficient. The feature defects report provides the management team with quality feedback, and is now in the measurement matrix of business OKR (Objectives and Key Results).



Each scrum team’s structure and profile are now very clear. A cross-team collaboration culture now exists, and teams are more integrated and likely to support each other. Cross-team project workflow now is working smoothly. Project delays due to dependencies on another team’s tasks or due to poor collaboration happen less often. Employees from all disciplines – developers, testers, customer service engineers, content developers, product owners, and super-geeks from the technology team all took part and enjoyed the agile games.



On the other hand, from the kickoff meeting to the final demo, over six months, Scrum Masters talked with their counterparts and key stakeholders, and led changes organization-wide. Their competence and influence develop

Speakers
avatar for Sunny Sun

Sunny Sun

Senior Agile Coach & Consultant, Director of Product, Genthy World Consulting Group
Ni Sun (Sunny) is a senior Agile Coach and Consultant with international training/coaching experiences in both China and U.S. She successfully led Agile transformation and Scrum/Kanban adoptions for her clients’ companies, including the industries of telecommunication, internet, finance, education, production, machinery, etc. She believes organizational agility drives from cultural agility; cultural agility drives from the agility of... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 14:45 - 15:15
Daytona

15:15

Conference PM Break
Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:15 - 15:45
Sun Lobby/Osceola Lobby

15:45

Taking Small Steps in a Big Organisation (An experience report on implementing ET) (John Stevenson)
Limited Capacity seats available

How can a single individual change how testing is done in a large, distributed organisation? (originally 8, 000+, now 70,000+) This is my story of how I implemented exploratory testing in a big company one step at a time. Working with small teams of 3-8 testers and progressing to division wide teams of 200+ testers. I provided opportunities for them to experience success and then capitalized on their passion to help promote the approach. By focusing on small steps and showing by doing, they were able to bring about great change.



The key elements of the talk discusses how I encouraged collaboration and empowered people to lead by example in their teams. I will provide tangible results of how this encouraged teams across the globe to take ownership of their own departmental training needs using me as support.



I will talk about the successes and the failures and what was learnt by this and how I am now moving forward and pushing into an even bigger organisation.



To help clarify I would classify myself as a 'change agent', who is a tester but with the remit by senior management to make testing more effective and efficient. Due to my experiences in software testing and my close links with the testing community it was felt by leadership teams within the organization to leverage my skills to promote the way testing was carried out and to radically change the mindset. Starting small meant working with small teams to start with and building up a team of evangelists in each country who could work with teams in their domains to improve their testing. The talk looks into how this was achieved and how we now have a network across the whole organization. with support from senior management.

Speakers
avatar for John Stevenson

John Stevenson

Technical Leader (Test), Cisco
Having been involved in testing for over 20 years and within the IT industry for more than 24 years I am still surprised with how exciting I find it and how much I continue to learn about things that are new. I have a passion for learning and love to learn about new things. I have an interest in many things such as social science, psychology, photography and gardening. I keep involved within the testing community and write a testing blog... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 16:15
Daytona

15:45

Amazing Results Through Healthy Relationships (Martin Alaimo)
Limited Capacity full

Have you ever wondered why certain approaches seem to work in one organization but not in another? Unfortunately, when thinking about Agile Methodologies as means to build successful products, many organizations and coaches focus their efforts on the artifacts, meetings and roles; setting the most important matter aside: the relationships among the individuals. And no, just stating a general value of 'Individuals and interactions over processes and tools' is not sufficient, building relationships takes work.



This session explores the basic relationships that drive human interactions in a working environment, how to identify bad relationship smells, and what you can do as a coach to help prevent or recover a team from their toxic relationships. Martin shares his experiences with the difference between assertions and opinions, what unconditional responsibility is, the power of continuous and effective feedback, trust, learning, emotions and commitments. Show up for this fantastic trip through personal relationships to help create a path towards achieving amazing results through healthy results!

Speakers
avatar for Martin Alaimo

Martin Alaimo

Agile Coach & Trainer, Founder, Kleer
I work as Organizational Coach and professional trainer. As a Certified Scrum Coach (CSC) and Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), my main area of intervention is team work under a collaborative and relational environment within the scope of technological products development. My main concern today is about helping other areas, beyond the technology one, to perceive and capitalize the benefits of this new working proposal, emphasising interpersonal... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sanibel

15:45

The Human Side of Agile Management: What It Takes to Grow Great Teams (Gil Broza)
Limited Capacity full

For best results from Agile, you need a solid team. If you manage, lead, or facilitate an Agile team, you’ve probably seen that process alone doesn’t translate to great results – and that having a cross-functional group of 7 +/- 2 “resources” doesn’t either. Instead, what makes Agile come to life is the team’s motivated, engaged individuals who communicate, collaborate, and respond effectively. In many organizations, teams rely on people in your position to help them grow and become stronger.



But how do you help them? What should you do, and not do? What does valuing “individuals and interactions over processes and tools” look and feel like? You are a servant leader; if you are not aware of the necessary skills and attributes, or not yet comfortable with them, come to this interactive presentation by the author of “The Human Side of Agile.” You’ll discover what makes great Agile teams tick. You’ll get a view, free of hype and cynicism, of how people in your position – Agile managers and leads – contribute to their teams’ success (or hold them back). And you’ll receive practical tips and develop insights into three key skills you need for supporting your team’s journey to greatness: communication, coaching, and facilitation.


Speakers
avatar for Gil Broza

Gil Broza

Principal Agile Mentor, 3P Vantage, Inc.
Gil Broza helps software organizations build and lead engaged, solid, high-performance Agile development teams. He guides teams and their leaders in creating effective, humane, and responsible work environments so they truly delight their customers and make a positive impact. He is an "all-rounder", working at all organizational levels and coaching people in both technical and leadership behaviors. His new book "The Agile Mind-set" helps... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 4

15:45

How-To Guide for Continuous Delivery (Steve Neely)
Limited Capacity filling up

Continuous Delivery is a hot topic in the Agile community. Deploying every commit to your production stack is the dream that few organizations have managed to reach. Why? Because it is difficult, complex, scary, and expensive. Wouldn't it be great if someone would just tell you how to do it?



In this presentation I’ll outline steps you can take to transform a *“traditional”* deployment process to a mean, lean, continuously delivered deployment pipeline. I'll focus on the how-tos, highlight pitfalls and traps, and explain the benefits of Continuous Delivery for your engineering teams and your business strategy.


Speakers
avatar for Steve Neely

Steve Neely

Research and Development, Rally Software
Steve Neely is a research and development engineer at Rally Software. His interests include: software craftsmanship, Agile techniques, continuous delivery, distributed systems, internet technologies, mobile and pervasive computing, informatics and data management, and semi-structured data. He likes to move fast and break things.



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Miami

15:45

The Power of Commitments (Jeff Nielsen)
Limited Capacity seats available

Doing what you say you will do, when you say you will do it, is one of the key ways to build a relationship of trust. Conversely, nothing erodes trust more quickly than a couple of missed deadlines or broken promises.



The ability to make and keep commitments is one of the hallmarks of a true Software Craftsman. Likewise, the most effective teams harness the power of commitment to forge strong and healthy partnerships with their customers. This is a surprisingly rare skill, but one that can be learned and improved.



In this session we'll look at the different kinds of commitments we make as individuals and teams. We'll distinguish between commitments and predictions. We'll reflect on why we sometimes commit when we shouldn't and vice versa. Most importantly, we'll practice some crucial "commitment conversations."




Speakers
JN

Jeff Nielsen

SVP of Engineering, 3Pillar Global
Jeff Nielsen is SVP of Engineering at 3Pillar Global. In this role, he oversees the delivery of technology services to all 3Pillar clients. Jeff is responsible for all development processes in the company and manages numerous global client-based engineering teams. Prior to 3Pillar, Jeff was the CTO and SVP of Delivery at the Santeon Group, where he ran their global software development initiatives and their agile coaching practice. At Santeon he... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sun D

15:45

Keeping The Auditor Away: DevOps Compliance Case Studies (Gene Kim, James Deluccia)
Limited Capacity seats available

Co-presenter James DeLuccia IV



Organizations and development teams are moving beyond static deployment models to those embracing a continuous delivery/DevOps-style set of processes. The deployment of doing tens, hundreds, or even thousands of deploys per day as 'normal' does not align to the SDLC, separation of duties, and common controls expected by auditors.



In this presentation, we will describe what auditors look for in a compliance audit, how to develop alternate control procedures that fulfill those reporting requirements, how to avoid “red flags” that indicate inadequate controls, and real world case studies and reporting artifacts.



Gene Kim has been studying high performing IT organizations since 1999 and helped develop the SOX scoping guidelines with the Institute of Internal Auditors in 2005. James DeLuccia IV is the leader for the Ernst & Young Americas Certification Services, James oversees all of the audits against common industry standards, and champions several global program implementation roll-outs. Developing and 'translating' the control environment behaviors of clients, such as Google, Amazon, Workday, and others is difficult. This discussion will bridge the needs of auditors with the community of developers by sharing examples, discussing the assurance expectations, and how to communicate to pass an audit.

Speakers
avatar for James DeLuccia

James DeLuccia

James DeLuccia IV a published author, practitioner, auditor, and currently a Senior Manager with Ernst & Young brings first hand research and experience on third party vendor trust and global security operations. Mr. DeLuccia leads the Americas certification and compliance services and acts as executive implementing global security programs. | | Mr. DeLuccia is currently writing a new book to prevent 'everybody' from being hacked... Read More →
avatar for Gene Kim

Gene Kim

Author, Researcher, IT Revolution
Gene is a multiple award winning CTO, researcher and author.  He was founder and CTO of Tripwire for 13 years. He has written three books, including “The Visible Ops Handbook” and “The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win."  Gene is a huge fan of IT operations, and how it can enable developers to maximize throughput of features from “code complete” to “in production,” without causing chaos and... Read More →


Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Tampa

15:45

Smart Scaling: Finding the right approach for Enterprise Agile (Richard Dolman, Steven Spearman)
Limited Capacity full

Are you looking for answers on scaling Agile but finding it hard to get unbiased information on the different options that are available? Well, this is the place to start that discovery!



This session is among the first, highly anticipated, public presentations of an analysis model that’s intended to help you answer the question:

What is the right scaling approach for our organization?



We’ll explore the major scaling options together. We’ll help you understand some of the key differentiators and criteria for choosing an approach (or rolling your own!). After a quick overview of the major scaling frameworks, we'll present the concept of the Agile Scaling Knowledge (ASK) matrix - an evolving tool for evaluating and selecting the right approach(es) for your organization.



We expect to have a lively discussion but we'll avoid any framework-specific cheerleading or bashing. We’ll instead elicit questions and insights that help drive decision-making and/or improvement. This will be a highly interactive session where participants will be encouraged to share their experiences, perspectives and questions on the topic. Together, we will come to insights that help you determine the right approaches for scaling agility in your organization.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Dolman

Richard Dolman

Enterprise Agile Coach and Trainer, agile42
My professional passion is helping companies solve critical business and technology challenges, and empowering and enabling collaborative, high-performing teams.
avatar for Steven Spearman

Steven Spearman

Agile Coach & Trainer, Swift Ascent, LLC
I'm passionate about Agile transformations and how that can drive business success AND improve the working lives of team members. Often that means using Scrum, sometimes Kanban, and sometimes coming up with something new that works for a given environment. | | Currently, I'm spending time on issues around Agile at scale - including the comparison information you can find on www.agilescaling.org | | Personally, I'm passionate about... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sarasota

15:45

Leadership at Spotify (Anders Ivarsson, Kristian Lindwall)
Limited Capacity filling up

Spotify have been growing quickly as a company, and we are continuously experimenting with ways of making the company work as effectively as possible. Creating strong team autonomy and making sure we are all aligned requires effective and strong servant leadership.



We have gotten a lot of attention for our way of organizing into squads, chapters, tribes and guilds. One question we often get is how management and leadership in this organization works. So we would like to share what leadership in a large agile organization like Spotify looks like.



Some of the topics we will cover are:

- What can leadership look like in a large agile organization?

- How can a leader support autonomy and alignment?

- How does a leader help growing high-impact teams?

- How our different forms of leadership - both formal and informal, product, organizational and technical - overlap and interact to create successful teams

- Fostering informal leadership

- Informal leadership - acts of leadership

- Challenges that we have run in to


Speakers
avatar for Anders Ivarsson

Anders Ivarsson

Agile Coach, Spotify
avatar for Kristian Lindwall

Kristian Lindwall

Agile coaches team lead, Spotify
I enjoy all aspects of software development. Since a couple of years back, I've changed my focus from developing the actual software to developing the organization that builds it. I am currently leading the agile coach team in one of the tribes at Spotify. Before I came to Spotify I worked as the development manager at the largest online broker company in Sweden. My strengths lies within the areas of: - leadership - bulding and growing teams... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola B

15:45

The Agile Influencer (Brian Bozzuto, Erin Beierwaltes)
Limited Capacity seats available

George Bernard Shaw once famously quipped that the biggest mistake in communication was the illusion that it happened. Likewise when influencing others to adopt a change, the largest challenge faced is that most of our efforts to change other's behaviors don't realize the changes we hope. Failing this, many organizations become directive and attempt to implement a change they way they may install a large piece of enterprise software. Organizations use consultants and lay out change strategies, which frequently degrade into directives, rules, and mandates that either fall by the wayside or are harshly enforced. This session is an exploration of a broader array of influence and change strategies beyond the traditional top down models of influence by dictate.



Based on the breakthrough research of numerous change experts, we’ll walk you through six dimensions of change that can help create the environment through which people are influenced to adopt the changes you are seeking. Using examples from the field, we will walk you through an exercise identifying influences, understanding their impact and developing new strategies. We will also help you identify which are your preferences and give you a way to better engage with others when talking about change so as to build the broadest and most inclusive approach for influencing positive change.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Beierwaltes

Erin Beierwaltes

Culture Designer, Designed Culture LLC
Erin Beierwaltes counts herself lucky to have found a passion in the agile and organizational cultural movement.Through a mix of system theories, cultural principles and business practices, Erin partners with businesses to find the right balance of product, process and people, to create a responsive and adaptive learning organization.Erin has been working on organizational development for over 10 years, working with established Product... Read More →
BB

Brian Bozzuto

Director of Product Development, Taxware



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola A

15:45

Software Development: Game w/Purpose (Paul Boos)
Limited Capacity seats available

Alistair Cockburn talks about software development as a cooperative game, but did you realize that is only one part of the puzzle? Many of the practices of Agile use typical boardgame mechanics; by viewing development in this manner, it can become easier to learn and later to customize as well. Shifting to a "game viewpoint" points out how we're all trying to "win", just that we have different perspectives on what winning means. This makes it ideal for people on a team just starting out and their immediate managers.



After a quick exercise to get people comfortable with their fellow team mates, I present and explain various boardgame mechanics and how these are then utilized when following an Agile approach. For example, deck-building can closely resemble backlog prioritization. Intermixed with the presentation will be several exercises that show some of these mechanics in use. I close with how to slowly introduce these mechanics and how they can be customized and also different methods of integrating these to allow some tailoring of the Agile game.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Boos

Paul Boos

Software Leadership Coach, Santeon Group
Paul Boos serves as as a coach helping executives, senior managers, and teams transform their thinking around leading software development. A passionate learner, he has continued to experientially learn better ways to do things in management positions inside the Federal Government, in contractors, in the commercial software product industry and as a naval officer over his 27 year career.


Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Naples

15:45

Long Term Adaptive Release Planning (David Bulkin, Donald Patti)
Limited Capacity seats available

There once was a myth that a Project Manager could plan many quarters in advance, and then the team could execute to those plans. That approached failed, and a new myth arose, for those using agile, that a team could spend a single day, after each release, to plan the next release. After all, the Product Owner is continually grooming the backlog and all they need to know from the team is the size of stories, so they can then prioritize.



Great release plans, just like great code-bases, and products, are created by the continual effort of many over a long period of time, with continual readjustments. In this session, we will look at real world strategies for working across roles to look ahead and actively recalibrate our release plans based on the input of many.



We will review approaches for high speed estimating, creating long term release plans at quarterly sessions, and then adjusting those plans via continual, short, re-planning sessions, where a holistic view is used to commit to the upcoming release and plan beyond the current release period.



Compared to traditional agile approaches we will have a much longer time horizon in our plan, created in a more collaborative fashion. Compared to traditional project planning, our plans will be continually informed by what we have learned.



The session will have a hands-on workshop, so come with pen and paper, and be prepared to work.


Speakers
DB

David Bulkin

VP and Head of Training Services, LitheSpeed
David Bulkin is a VP and Head of Training Services at LitheSpeed, where he delivers training and coaching to clients in North America, Australia, India, Europe and Africa. David is a part time agile editor at InfoQ, and co-founder of the Agile Leadership Network of NJ. David has 30 years experience delivering software and systems and has been applying agile methods for 10+ years across the entire value stream from strategy and product ideation to... Read More →
DP

Donald Patti

Director of Applications, AAMC
Donald Patti is a Director of Applications for the AAMC, a non-profit organization that serves medical schools and students by providing services that enable members to improve the health of all. He also teaches courses in software development, web design, e-business and project management for the University of Phoenix. Prior speaking engagements have included presentations on risk management to PMI Washington DC, on Agile to PMI Washington DC... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Sun C

15:45

The Impact of Agile Quantified: A de-Mystery Thriller (with new metrics and data for 2014) (Larry Maccherone)
Limited Capacity filling up

What’s a De-Mystery Thriller?

In the style of a pulp detective story, the secrets of Agile metrics will be de-mystified before your very eyes by detective Rally Metricson and his sidekick Larry Maccherone.

Welcome to Lean-Agile City. It’s a nice enough place — but there’s a new gang in town, and though they’re a well-meaning bunch, there’s a few of them named Intuition, Folklore, and Anecdote, and they’re not always so trustworthy… here’s how to keep away from them:

For the first time in Agile history, there’s solid research backed by hard numbers of tens of thousands of teams from a pool of hundreds of thousands of projects. Last year’s initial research focused on a handful of parameters that we could extract from existing data. From that data we found insights on practices that can help teams achieve up to:



  • 250% better Quality





  • 60% better Productivity



  • 40% better Predictability



  • 60% better Responsiveness



This year, we are looking at 35 total variables and have a fully predictive model of performance based upon the team's context as well as their behaviors and practices. With this model, we can make context-sensitive recommendations to target improvement efforts.

If last year's work was the first flight at Kitty Hawk, this year's is landing on the moon. And there's a great view of the big picture from up there.

A FINAL WARNING: DO NOT COME TO THIS SESSION UNLESS YOU ARE PREPARED TO HAVE YOUR MOST CLOSELY HELD BELIEFS ABOUT AGILE CHALLENGED WITH DATA.

What to expect:



  • A presentation of general findings from our first and second year of research



  • Introduction to the first-ever quantified and fully-predictive decision framework for targeting improvement and making agile practice decisions, including “what-if” analyses and recommendations personalized to each team’s specific set of practices.



  • Detailed but understandable numbers that use your own economic model to make informed trade-off decisions.



Speakers
avatar for Larry Maccherone

Larry Maccherone

Optimizer, AgileCraft
Larry Maccherone is an accomplished author and highly rated speaker who has regularly presented at major international conferences on Lean and Agile. He is very excited to have recently joined AgileCraft where his passion for analytics and visualization is helping AgileCraft be the best way to scale Agile. Prior to that, he led the Insights product line at Rally Software. His core area of expertise is drawing interesting insights from data... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Tallahassee

15:45

Research Lightning Talks
Limited Capacity seats available

The Dissonance Between Business and Product Development (Jay Compton, John Bottiglieri)

AGILEUXModel – Towards a Reference Model on Integrating UX in Developing Software using Agile Methodologies (Angela Peres, Tiago Silva Da Silva, Fernando Selleri Silva, Felipe Furtado Soares, Carlos Rosemberg Maia de Carvalho, Silvio Lemos Meira)

What Do You Mean When You Discuss “Agile”? A Systematic Mapping of Agile Publications at ICSE and Agile (Sydney Pratte, Theodore D. Hellmann, Frank Maurer)

A Systematic Mapping on Agile UX Across Three Major Agile Conferences (Tiago Silva Da Silva, Milene Silveira, Fabio Silveira)

Agile Methods Adoption on Software Development - a Pilot Review (Caio Silva, Alfredo Goldman)

Technical debt management: Where to start from? Preliminary experiences from an action research study (Graziela Simone Tonin, Vinícius Suyama, Nara Sakamoto, Danilo Saita, Enderson Bazetti, Danilo Possarle, Viviane Santos, Alfredo Goldman)

Network Analysis for Software Patterns including Organizational Patterns in Portland Pattern Repository (Hironori Washizaki, Masashi Kadoya, Yoshiaki Fukazawa, Takeshi Kawamura)


Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Gainesville

15:45

Go From a Nebulous Vision to Iteration One in 3 Steps (Mary Brodie)
Limited Capacity seats available

Imagine you are on a team that needs to create a new app/product/service proposed by the executive team for your company. The business team scrambles to figure out which problems they are solving for, nevermind what the solution should be. As a UX professional, you are waiting to hear from the business as to what they want to do, but they want you to just dive in and help them "see it." In the early stages of defining a product/project, the only way to get started solving a problem is to use various visualization styles to help define the problem and create a solution simultaneously. Prototypes can help define project scope, but sometimes a simple flow diagram, site map, wireframe or other visualization tools help the business figure out what this could be - short- and long-term. The challenge with prototypes is that they can sometimes give the impression that a problem has been solved and on its way to be built when in fact the project is still only a nebulous vision that could change the next week.



UX and the business need to partner to create a vision and effectively communicate the problem and solution to the technology team. Everyone needs to be talking a similar language - and only visualizations can help.



I outline a methodology that addresses how UX can work with all teams and help the business gain clarity during the those early, nebulous phases of a new project.

-- Step 1: The Big Vision: discuss what could it be, where could it go, where could it grow - everything but the kitchen sink (and then some) is included (and encouraged to be discussed)

-- Step 2: Reality Hits: prioritize what's needed to go to market

-- Step 3: Define Release: define structure to determine release schedules and launch date

This takes longer than a couple of weeks, but it is a fast-track approach to helps a team focus to get something to market. The types of visualizations used span from traditional site maps and wireframes to other maps and models (included in the talk) that give life to a changing idea.



This concludes with an activity/discussion with the audience as to how this approach could help give definition before a team gets started with Iteration One.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Brodie

Mary Brodie

Founder & Strategist, Gearmark
I've been working in UX for 20 years, and with virtual teams for 15. I have worked with startups and enterprises in the travel, health care, hardware, and software industries. I have worn many UX hats: strategy, usability testing, sketching/wireframing/prototyping, producer/project management, product management, and more recently content strategy and how integrates and enhances the UX. Agile and UX are my passions - I sometimes don't... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 5/6

15:45

Practical Application of Dude's Law: Come Play the Value Estimation Game! (Michael Carey, Todd Kromann)
Limited Capacity full

You know how you determine the "bigness" of your work and establishing commitments, but how do your customers ensure you're committing to the right thing?



Come experience relative estimation to determine value. We'll use David Hussman's "Dude's Law" (Value = Why? / How?) to prioritize the work.



We will share techniques for determining the "Why?" so that you can generate a Value Index. What many people will be surprised to learn is that they already have tools for sizing that can be used for determining value and prioritization.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Kromann

Todd Kromann

Agile Coach, Walmart
Todd has nearly two decades of experience creating and deploying Agile methods for IBM, Accenture, Toyota, Honda, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, SaveMart, PG&E, ADP, Sony, SAIC, and Nationwide Insurance. He has a Masters in Software Engineering and Bachelors in Psychology. Todd also holds numerous certifications, including: PMP, ScrumMaster, Java Development, and RUP Implementation. In addition to Agile Coaching, Todd has served as a Project Manager... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 3

15:45

The ultimate enchantment: A Product whispers to Business and Product development teams (Raje Kailasam)
Limited Capacity seats available

Where is the idea for a product born? When does it become a narrative? A story? How does it make its journey into this world?

A song that Sir Paul McCartney wrote from him dreams; A machine, a cure, an app that was designed in a dream - Seems like these products spoke to their creators. Enchanted and filled them with passion; creativity; joy and urgency; and a need to make them a reality.



How would it be if your product spoke to you? Seducing you to make that precious idea in your mind a reality.



Join us to journey into the products life! To live in its persona. To perceive it with the highest regard. To treat it with compassion. And above all to position yourself as its creator and connect with it.

After walking you through real life story of how the concept of "product persona" was born, and its application, you will be given the opportunity to create "product personas" for ideas that want to flow from your mind; or products that you are currently working on.

Speakers
avatar for Raje Kailasam

Raje Kailasam

Agile Coach, Cognizant Technology Solutions
During the past couple of years, I have been blessed to have worked / interacted extensively with entrepreneurs, veterans, small business owners, healthcare professionals and spiritual seekers ; these interactions in turn inspired me to create the 5 Step-Presencing method (introspection, suspension, ukemi, retrospectives and moving forward), Agile Immersionists Method (A.I.M) and the concept of Product Persona for Agile coaching. | I... Read More →



Wednesday July 30, 2014 15:45 - 17:00
Osceola 1/2

16:30

Using Communities of Practice for Alignment and Continuous Improvement at DigitalGlobe (Andrew Korbel)
Limited Capacity full

Have you ever wondered how agile teams that contain various roles can gain alignment in areas such as process, practices, and craftsmanship while continuously improving. Well, the answer for our teams was establishing Communities of Practice (CoP). Our teams within DigitalGlobe went from four agile teams in one location to 12 agile teams in 3 locations in a matter of months. This rapid scaling presented multiple challenges around our established processes, practices, and individual craftsmanship. Furthermore, this rapid scaling also posed challenges to our continuous improvement culture now that we were so dispersed and teams had different levels of maturity.



This report will show you a pragmatic way to get started using CoP to help solve challenges that your agile teams face. The report will discuss the guiding principles and different types of CoP to help get buy in from all levels of the organization to get started and keep going. Furthermore, you will get a firm understanding on how to measure value of CoP in your organization in a qualitative and quantitative approach. Throughout this report, you will hear practical applications and learnings rooted from DigitalGlobe’s experience building and executing CoPs.


Speakers
avatar for Andrew Korbel

Andrew Korbel

Agile Coach, DigitalGlobe
I am a passionate, lean and pragmatic thinker that loves coaching, teaching, facilitating, and mentoring teams as well as individuals throughout all levels of an organization.


Wednesday July 30, 2014 16:30 - 17:00
Daytona

17:30

Agile Alliance Members Meeting
Limited Capacity filling up

The annual Agile Alliance Member's Meeting will be held at the Agile2014 conference. Members are invited to meet, hear about, and discuss Alliance business with the Agile Alliance Board of Directors. Drinks and snacks will be served.

Wednesday July 30, 2014 17:30 - 18:30
Sun C

18:30

Agile2014 Theme Park Hopper Sponsor Reception
Have fun, eat, drink and be merry while getting your Agile2014 Passport stamped at this year's Sponsor Reception. Our Sponsors play a vital role in making this annual conference a great success. So come out and visit with them, find out the latest and greatest in Agile development, collect stamps, enjoy appetizers and drink, and enter for your chance to win some very cool prizes!

Wednesday July 30, 2014 18:30 - 20:30
Osceola C&D
 
Thursday, July 31
 

07:30

Registration/Hospitality Desk OPEN
Thursday July 31, 2014 07:30 - 17:30
Osceola Lobby

08:00

Conference Breakfast
Thursday July 31, 2014 08:00 - 09:00
Sun Lobby

08:00

Coaches Clinic OPEN
Thursday July 31, 2014 08:00 - 17:00
Osceola Lobby

08:00

Bookstore OPEN
Thursday July 31, 2014 08:00 - 18:00
Osceola Lobby

08:30

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss?  Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.  

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment.  We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam daily huddle at 8:30 in the City Hall Lobby to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join! 

Thursday July 31, 2014 08:30 - 09:00
City Hall Lobby - Open Jam

09:00

Distributing Expertise in Agile Software Development Projects (Mawarny Md Rejab)
Limited Capacity filling up

Through a Grounded Theory study involving 18 Agile practitioners based in New Zealand and Australia, we revealed five approaches to distributing expertise in Agile teams.

Speakers


Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 09:30
Osceola 3

09:00

Facilitating Intense Conversations: What to do When it Gets Hot (Lyssa Adkins)
Limited Capacity full

If we are to achieve great results through agile, we have to find a way to allow team members to be more fully human which means including the more intense side of team life. Yet, most coaches and mentors find themselves a bit flat-footed or feel overwhelmed when conversations get heated, and especially when they get personal. Very few of us have the skills and experience to navigate intense conversations so when a hot moment arises, we often sidestep it, take it “offline”, or jump in to mediate it. We didn’t learn this stuff in school! But it’s time to learn it now.



In this session, Lyssa Adkins will demonstrate the key skills for facilitating intense conversations in real-time as a group of passionate session participants conduct a conversation on a controversial agile community topic. Stop-action moments will let us “unpack” what just happened in the conversation and what Lyssa did in the facilitation so participants can see what they might do in similar situations to extract the value while working with the heat. We will all learn from this intense, real and immediate experience.

Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Coach of Agile Coaches, Agile Coaching Institute
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective needed to guide teams and Agile leaders to harness Agile as the competitive advantage weapon it was meant to be. I know the transformation path is rocky. As a... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sun D

09:00

Facilitating Group Decisions: Introducing the Consensus Workshop (Nathaniel Cadwell)
Limited Capacity full

Have you ever worked with a group who struggles to make decisions? They leave meetings frustrated, drained, or at the very least without agreement on a path forward. Does the prospect of participating in their next gathering even leave you with a sense of unease? There’s a tool for that!



Introducing the Consensus Workshop. In this interactive session you will learn how to use a method with a 40 plus year track record of success in helping groups come to consensus in a short period of time. You’ll leave the session with new ideas on how to facilitate group decision-making in a way that all members feel their ideas have been heard and where they can support the group’s decision.



This is a limited capacity workshop. Attendees will receive a bonus Instructables-style handout on how to make their own "sticky wall."

Speakers
NC

Nathaniel Cadwell

Agile Coach and Consultant, LiftHand
Nathaniel Cadwell has over fifteen years of consulting experience in: software development, agile enablement, and change management. Over the course of his career, he has helped organizations achieve dramatic improvement in their software delivery. In his current role, Nathaniel is an agile coach helping individuals, teams, and organizations on their path to agility. His experience spans from large multi-team engagements with Fortune 50... Read More →


Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sanibel

09:00

Refactoring Test Collaboration (Claire Moss)
Limited Capacity seats available

Collective ownership for testing starts with understanding testing. Rework your team dynamics to evolve past duplication and improve performance through whole team testing. Take home practical patterns for improving your team's collaboration on testing. Because teams who own testing have more confidence in the customer value of their results.



As the Pragmatic Programmers say, "refactoring is an activity that needs to be undertaken slowly, deliberately, and carefully," so how do we begin?



In this session, we will experience the complex interactions of an agile team focused on demonstrating customer value by answering a series a questions:

Where do testers get their ideas?

How are you planning to accomplish this proposed testing, tester?

Why not automate all the things?

Who is going to do this manual testing and how does it work?

How do we know whether we're testing the right things?



Build your own list of TODOs from these various practical collaboration approaches and begin deduping your team's testing for a better first day back at the office.

Speakers
avatar for Claire Moss

Claire Moss

Agile Tester, VersionOne
Software testing speaker, workshop facilitator, author, and blogger. Agile software tester working closely with product development team. I help teams to craft more testable user stories. Testing teacher, unit and integration test review and advisement, exploratory testing coach. Exploratory tester and test automator. | Claire Moss has always had a passion for writing, which might be a strange trait for a discrete mathematician, but that... Read More →


Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sun C

09:00

TDD And A New Paradigm For Hardware Development (Neil Johnson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Code first and ask questions later... that's how we approach hardware development. Our big-bang, test-last development cycles make for poor initial code quality, long debug loops and a lot of wasted effort. If you code first and ask questions later, chances are you've seen what we've seen... and can learn what we've learned.



This talk proposes a new paradigm for developing high quality hardware that's similar to how agile teams develop high quality software. We'll talk about the current state of hardware development, look at how TDD and unit testing can be used to improve hardware quality and show how teams have overcome "best practice" inertia through new paradigm case studies. We'll also make time for you to chime in with your own ideas and finish up with a live TDD demo!

Speakers

Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Tampa

09:00

I build the future - a practical look at the evolution of delivering software and services (Andrew Clay Shafer)
Limited Capacity filling up

Software was delivered before the Agile manifesto. Services were running before anyone spoke the word devops.



What about the Agile manifesto resonated with so many people that we now have a conference devoted to this ideal?



What changed that makes devops a timely and advantageous addition to the story? Why wasn't 'continuous delivery' part of the initial Agile story?



In the context of devops, what was considered best practice a few years ago, can seem primitive compared to what people are doing today. Did the world really 'change'? Was the past really 'wrong'?



How does this all relate to CMMI and ITIL? Large and small teams? Culture and Technology? Past, Present and Future.



What has really changed? What has remained the same? Is there a one true way?



People tend to get hung up on techniques and tactics, perhaps going so far as to disdain principles as philosophical and impractical.



Techniques have context. Only with the underlying 'why' is a technique alive and practical.


Speakers
avatar for Andrew Clay Shafer

Andrew Clay Shafer

Clown Prince, Parvus Captus
we do what we can


Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Sarasota

09:00

Reducing Resistance: Deployment as a Surface (Jeffrey Hulten)
Limited Capacity seats available

Deployment is where it 'gets real'. Every decision and compromise you have made is suddenly exposed and affects whether your product will take off or crash and burn. We will condense these decisions down to the 'surface area' of your deployment and use analogies from the physical world to examine the effects of our decisions on deployment and how to recognize where our project is going to crash well before we launch.



Some questions we will ask include:

- Does your favorite library come with too much baggage?

- When does a new language bring lift to your project?

- How long can unowned code live before it drags you down?



This journey will progress from simple package based deployments, through convergent infrastructure using tools like Chef, to image based deployment with Docker and examine the effects our decisions have in each step. While the discussion will be primarily conceptual, we will be rooting it in a real world example to reinforce the concepts discussed.


Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Hulten

Jeffrey Hulten

Software Engineer, Whitepages, Inc.
A once and future entrepreneur, Jeffrey currently works for WhitePages, Inc as a Software Engineer in their Architecture Improvement Tead identifying common pain points in the engineering organization and eliminating them. Before returning to corporate life, Jeffrey created a consulting company called Automated Labs to help companies automate infrastructure, increase application performance, and bring an experimental mindset to adding value. He... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Miami

09:00

Comparative Analysis of Three Agile Transformations in a F500 Corporation (Israel Gat)
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will explore the effects of subtle variances in Agile implementations by drawing upon three business unit transformations I carried out for a single F500 client in the 2009-2013 timeframe. Each of the transformations was contractually independent of the others. However, all three exhibited a remarkable level of contextual similarity that enables the “apples to apples” comparison given in this presentation.



In particular, biz/dev alignment emerged as the #1 determinant of success in each of the three engagements, eclipsing other aspects of implementing Agile at scale such as strategy, funding, corporate processes, metrics, governance and culture. This finding is consistent with my experience in numerous other engagements in matrixed organizations: applying Agile at the team level is usually straightforward, but wholehearted buy-in by the business is essential for scaling.



At a certain level, Agile is all about the role that technology plays in business problem solving. Hence, unless a satisfactory alignment between the business and development is attained, an Agile transformation is not likely to reach the “escape velocity” (to use Geoffrey Moore’s metaphor) required for freeing software development from the pull of the past.


Speakers
IG

Israel Gat

Practice Director, Agile Product & Project Management, Cutter Consortium
Dr. Israel Gat is a Cutter Consortium Fellow and Director of the Agile Product & Project Management practice, a Fellow of the Lean Systems Society, and a member of the Trident Capital SaaS advisory board. He is recognized as the architect of the agile transformation at BMC Software where, under his leadership, Scrum users increased from zero to 1,000, resulting in nearly three times faster time to market than industry average and 20%-50... Read More →


Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola A

09:00

De-Scale Your Organization! (Olaf Lewitz)
Limited Capacity full

Stop trying to scale agile, de-scale your organization! Let your people have more options to deliver value.



Most effort in large organizations goes into "cover my ass" kind of “work”. In most code I've seen in my life I could easily see the pain and lack of safety of the people creating it. As Conway said: a complex, bureaucratic organization can only deliver a complex, bureaucratic system.



We model our organisations based on out-dated thinking. In contrast to engineers and architects, we are not constrained by physical boundaries. We build software! We seriously limit our potential by using the wrong mental models. The scaling challenges we're facing are results of a broken paradigm. And I want to offer a new way to look at it, which actually is the original intent of Scrum as I understand it.



Scrum is designed to remove models, to break rules, not to be warped to fit them. It's a means to find out what doesn't help in a system and experiment with alternatives. Scrum allows you to de-scale your organisation with a focus on the only asset that will ever produce value: your people. You will learn something about humans, human organisations, and what you've never been told before about Scrum.



I will give you things to think and talk about, and lots of ideas to put into practice.



Expect a provocative talk of max 40 min and a hopefully controversial conversation.


Speakers
avatar for Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Trust Artist, trustartist.com
Witch, Nomad, Pioneer.Trust Artist. Connecting with people to enable them to increase trust, in themselves and others.Will stay when needed and leave when wanted.Loving and challenging.Using Scrum, Kanban, CoreProtocols, NVC, agile or better.



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola 4

09:00

Driving Scaled Agile at TomTom: the Good; the Bad; and the Ugly (James Janisse)
Limited Capacity full

TomTom is a billion-dollar company that invented the personal navigation market segment over ten years ago. In response to increasing engineering costs and decreasing throughput and quality, our CEO recently challenged us to reinvent ourselves as a "World Class Software Organisation" within the next 5 years.



Agile champions, change-agents, and senior leadership that attend this session will learn how we have taken the first steps to fundamentally re-engineering how we bring innovation to market using the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe). In terms of the "Good", the first commercial product developed and delivered using SAFe enjoyed more than a 50% reduction in time-to-market as well as a 25% increase in quality . Examples of the "Bad" include a decrease in employee satisfaction scores and product net promoter scores. Finally examples of the "Ugly" include resistance to change, impact on job descriptions and titles, impact on the concept of "line management", and in a few cases employee turnover triggered by the adoption of SAFe. By attending this presentation you will learn from our experiences and discover the strategies we have put in place to eliminate and transform the negatives of adopting SAFe.



Don't despair. The good more than outweighs the bad and the ugly combined.

Speakers
JJ

James Janisse

VP Connected Navigation Application, TomTom
James successfully adopted the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) as well as Rally within one of the largest software engineering product unit's within TomTom. Results achieved so far include drastic reduction in time to implement new products and features, as well as a corresponding increase in quality. As a result of this initial success, he is also involved in helping the other engineering units review and adopt SAFe for their organisation. James... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Daytona

09:00

Continuous Improvement: Hell on Earth? (Katherine Kirk)
Limited Capacity full

We all seem to love the term 'continuous improvement' - which is an honourable intention. But just because you are Agile/Lean doesn't mean you will automatically improve! Even in Agile/Lean teams the reality is that, without the 'right' approach , continuous improvement can sometimes be hell on earth - e.g. to always be 'not good enough'. In fact, some corporations, managers and teams have been known to use this phrase as an excuse for behaving badly, producing the opposite effect on team collaboration and culture than is intended (e.g. apathy).



So, how can an honorable intention like continuous improvement create a negative impact on teams and culture? If so - how do we avoid it? What are other ways of handling this need to consistently overcome challenges in an ever-changing industry? How does Agile handle these difficulties and is it any better?



Using fun games and exercises, interlaced with informative case study examples and eastern philosophy modeling this workshop reflects on what continuous improvement really feels like on the ground and explores how we might want to approach 'getting better' by looking at and drawing from other perspectives.



Come to this workshop and experience how a simple perspective change to the way you approach CI can help mitigate against difficulties and how even just applying one useful technique can really help in the real world.

Speakers
KK

Katherine Kirk

Agile/Lean Coach, Independent
Now an independent consultant and researcher, Katherine has solid experience contracting and freelancing in a variety of roles within the IT and Media industries: from blue chip investment banking to media conglomerates. She has spent time as an Agile Coach at Rally after a period consulting as Delivery Improvement Specialist, Project Manager and Agile Coach at the BBC in the Future Media division in London. Katherine often finds herself... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Naples

09:00

Lightning Talks: Process
Limited Capacity filling up

Actionable Agile metrics (Roland Backlin)

What Evidence Do You Have That Agile is Working? (Mark Noneman)

Continuous Discovery, The Power of Pure Agile (Woody Zuill)

Continuous delivery for databases – a pipe dream? (Ben Rees)

The Agile Manifesto and Star Wars (Aaron Griffith)

Remotely Agile? (Mark Kilby)

 

There will also be sign-up for just-in-time lightning talks near Open Jam and 15 minutes before the session starts.



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Gainesville

09:00

Active Portfolio Management (John Rudd)
Limited Capacity filling up

When Agile teams begin to deliver products incrementally, new opportunities open up at the portfolio level, delivering strategic business value. However, the traditional approach to portfolio management — which depends upon long-range forecasting and fixed financial controls — breaks down as business environments grow more complex, leaving portfolio managers ill-equipped to reap the potential benefits of their Agile programs.



In this 75-minute interactive session, John Rudd will introduce tools that help portfolio managers not only survive but thrive under conditions of high business uncertainty. Participants will take part in facilitated team-based exercises,which will help them gain an understanding of common financial language, real options analysis, the dynamic business case, and how to use risk profiles to determine which financial controls best fit different classes of investments.

Speakers
avatar for John Rudd

John Rudd

Managing Director, SolutionsIQ
John is an industry leader in the emerging field of Agile portfolio services, which includes developing Agile business cases, transitioning from “buy and hold” strategies to dynamic funding of programs, and assessing risk and capturing business value under highly uncertain conditions. With 7 years of experience in the Agile space, his practice areas include change management, Agile portfolios, governance, and executive alignment... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola 5/6

09:00

Patterns of Automation (Jeffrey Morgan)
Limited Capacity full

Many organizations are introducing test automation only to find out it is more difficult than they thought it would be. Good test automation requires good coding practices. Good test automation requires good design. To do anything else will lead to spaghetti code that is hard to maintain or update. If you’re new to coding or new to automation it is difficult to know where to start. Join Cheezy as he talks about and demonstrates lessons he has learned while helping numerous organization adopt test automation. He will show you the patterns he uses to keep automation code simple and clean. He will also demonstrate techniques that you can use to make your automation code more maintainable. Finally, he will write code to implement these patterns taking them from theory to implementation.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff

Jeff "Cheezy" Morgan

CTO / Agile Coach, LeanDog
Cheezy is an international speaker and keynote presenter in different Agile conferences. He has spoken 6 times at the Agile 20XX conferences as well as other ones like Agile development East and West, Mile High Agile, Agile and Beyond, Path to Agility, etc.


Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola 1/2

09:00

Build Products that Matter with Innovation Accounting (David Bland)
Limited Capacity seats available

Innovative Accounting will land you in prison, but Innovation Accounting will land you a product that matters. In this interactive Lean Startup workshop, I'll cover the basics of Innovation Accounting. We'll then dive into hands on exercises with Pirate Metrics, Lean Analytics Phases and the Passionate User Model. You'll leave this workshop with a better understanding of how to apply Innovation Accounting to both increase retention and reduce friction in your product or service.

Speakers
DB

David Bland

Principal Advisor, Neo
David helps organizations change how they create and deliver value. He's advised teams responsible for millions of dollars of revenue to embrace the shift from "can we build it" to "should we build it". When he's not advising Silicon Valley Startups and the Fortune 500, David can be found speaking, writing and leading workshops on lean startup, business model generation and customer development.



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Osceola B

09:00

Conversation Patterns for Software Professionals (Michał Bartyzel)
Limited Capacity seats available

We have created lots of tools which are intended to structure fuzzy or unclear business needs. We have created use cases, user stories, acceptance test and so forth.



Although the tools above were designed to improve collaboration with customers , we use them to hide ourselves from business people. Instead of talking to an individual we tend to complete the forms.



The issue motivated me to start working on Conversation Patterns for Software Professionals, which are techniques for having better conversations with stakeholders and drilling their real needs. The Patterns makes soft skills more technical guy-friendly and easier to apply.



I do believe that quality of answers you get attests to quality of questions you have asked. So, which of the following questions will give the most valuable informations?:

* 'Do you want to add new items to the backlog?'

* 'What of new items you want to add to the backlog?'

* 'What of new features you're going to use next week?'



Not sure? Join this presentation and verify questions you use to ask.


Speakers
MB

Michał Bartyzel

BNS IT s.c.
I spent couple years working with business-IT issues. Help development teams to understand customers’ needs in order to work more effectively. I am truly convinced that keys to the software craftsmanship are linguistic skills, so have wrote the book on the subject in Polish. | | Currently I am working on Conversation Patterns for Software Professionals which are techniques for having quality conversations with stakeholders. | | I am... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:00 - 10:15
Tallahassee

09:45

Work Motivational Challenges Regarding the Interface Between Agile Teams and a Non-Agile Surrounding Organization: A case study (Lucan Gren)
Limited Capacity full

This case study, conducted at Volvo Logistics in Sweden, shows an example of work motivational aspects that might surface when an agile team exists in the middle of a more traditional structure.

Speakers
avatar for Lucas Gren

Lucas Gren

PhD Student, Chalmers and University of Gothenburg
Doing research on group psychology aspects of software engineering.



Thursday July 31, 2014 09:45 - 10:15
Osceola 3

10:00

Exhibits OPEN
Thursday July 31, 2014 10:00 - 14:00
Osceola ABCD

10:15

Conference AM Break
Thursday July 31, 2014 10:15 - 10:45
Sun Lobby/Osceola Lobby

10:45

Project's DNA: A Descriptive Case Study on the Effects of Transforming Agile Single-site to Distributed Software Development (Raoul Vallon)
Limited Capacity seats available

A 15-month descriptive case study on a real-world Scrum process transformation from a single-site to a distributed development environment in a medium-sized software development organization in Austria.

Speakers
RV

Raoul Vallon

PhD Candidate, Research Group for Industrial Software, Vienna University of Technology



Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 11:15
Osceola 3

10:45

Creating Agile Tribes: Herding CATs for Fun and Customer Delight (Jean Tabaka, Em Campbell-Pretty)
Limited Capacity filling up

When you create Agile teams you typically tell people about a methodology. You probably explained their roles within the decision framework to guide their responsibilities and actions. And you told them that they collaborate and coordinate their decisions versus being told what to do.



But where do we help teams bond? How do you support their sense of belonging and value and respect for one another? We believe you will fail in your Agile adoption if you are not explicit in creating and sustaining these attributes. What you are missing is a sense of “tribes.” But what is a tribe? Who creates it? What holds it together? Our answers may startle you.



For us, Agile success relies on each team’s sense of their individual identity coupled with the tribe’s sense of unity. We’re convinced that the notion of creating and sustaining tribes is pivotal to scaling Agile. And yet this notion seems conspicuously absent in how experts talk about success in scaling Agile? In this talk, Em and Jean bring the good, the bad and ugly from their research, personal insights, and stories about tribes.


Speakers
avatar for Em Campbell-Pretty

Em Campbell-Pretty

Partner, Context Matters
Em is a Partner at Context Matters, Australia's leading Enterprise Agile consultancy. After close to 20 years in business management roles within multinational blue chip corporations, Em discovered Agile and became passionate about the chance it provides to align business and IT around the delivery of value. In 2012, she launched Australia’s first Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) Agile Release Train. The story of the cultural transformation that... Read More →
avatar for Jean Tabaka

Jean Tabaka

Agile Fellow, CA
Hey all! I'm excited to be joining everyone here. I continue to be passionate about the ways that we can apply Agile principles and values to extend humaneness in how we work. Being able to bring my passion into my 13,000 person organization is exciting and daunting. But when you work with amazing people who want to do the right thing, why wouldn't you want to give it your best? My good ol' conviction in the power of facilitation and... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sun D

10:45

Women in Agile: Creating Teams That Embrace Diversity (Diane Zajac-Woodie, Doc Norton)
Limited Capacity full

With the popularity of Sheryl Sandberg’s book *Lean In*, there is an increase in the number of conversations about the treatment and choices of women in the workplace. Do those conversations apply in the agile space, with its focus on individuals and interactions? Can we assume that the rituals associated with agile, by their very nature of collaboration, create environments of equality? Or are the biases that affect the general population evident in self-organizing teams too?



In this session, Diane and Doc provide an overview of some common biases regarding gender. Then they look at how some of the common practices used by agile teams may be perpetuating a culture of subtle inequality. Diane and Doc share some of the benefits of encouraging diversity on our teams and kick start the discussion about what teams can modify to achieve it.



You will leave with an increased awareness of your own biases and those affecting your team. You will also be challenged to try at least one suggestion for tweaking your teams behaviors when you return to work.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Zajac-Woodie

Diane Zajac-Woodie

Agent of Change, Green Jeans Consulting
http://www.greenjeansconsulting.com/ http://agilesquirrel.blogspot.com/


Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sarasota

10:45

Sustainable Legacy Code Refactoring: A Systematic and Stepwise Approach (Amr Noaman)
Limited Capacity full

One of the most painful activities in software development is maintaining extremely poor legacy code! Moreover, teams transitioning to Agile suffer from challenges like moving towards shorter iterations with shorter time for regression testing, trying to cover poor code with automated tests, prioritizing which refactorings to apply on which code, and convincing managers with the value of refactoring.



In this session, I will present a quick summary about approaches to tackle these challenges, like: *'Whole or nothing', 'technical-hero', 'try-retry', 'as per the book'* approaches. Then, I will present a simple, more sustainable, and stepwise approach. This approach divides the effort to refactor legacy code into three stages: (1) *Quick-wins*; simple and least risky enhancements (2) *Divide-and-conquer* the code into functional, utility, and architectural components, with identified and clear component interfaces. (3) *Inject-quality-in* the code by wrapping components with automated tests. I will also give an overview of several experiments and case studies applying this approach and will present some interesting observations and insights about refactoring legacy applications. Finally, I will drive you through the roadmap and will demonstrate step-by-step how refactoring a piece of cluttered and spaghetti code takes place.

Speakers
avatar for Amr Noaman

Amr Noaman

Co-Founder & Principal Consultant, Agile Academy
Over the last 7 years, Amr’s primary role was to spread agile awareness and lean thinking in software organizations in Egypt and the Middle East. Amr is the co-founder of Agile Academy and Egypt's Lean & Agile Network, one of the largest Agile communities in the Middle East. | In 2011, Amr has initiated Egypt's GoAgile program, the biggest agile adoption initiative sponsored by the Egyptian government for expanding agile practices and lean... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 1/2

10:45

Building a Culture of Operational Excellence (Arup Chakrabarti)
Limited Capacity seats available

For many companies, Software Operations is something that is kept completely separate from Software Development. Now, with infrastructure automation frameworks blurring the lines between what is Software Operations and Development, how do teams decide on who owns what? How do teams not end up pointing the finger at each other when something breaks? In this talk, we will focus on tactics and strategies that can be used in getting teams to work better together and helping engineers think of Operational Excellence with every line of code written. We will cover how many companies are moving to a distributed operations model and how they are able to reinforce ownership.

Speakers
avatar for Arup Chakrabarti

Arup Chakrabarti

Engineering Manager - Operations Engineering, PagerDuty
Arup has been working in the space of software operations since 2007. He started out at as an Operations Engineer at Amazon, helping to reduce customer defects with multiple teams for the Amazon Marketplace. Since then, he has managed and built operations teams at Amazon and Netflix to help improve availability and reliability. He currently works at PagerDuty, where he is part of the Operations Engineering Team.


Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Tampa

10:45

DevOps as Disruptive Innovation (John Esser)
Limited Capacity seats available

Is it difficult or even impossible for you or your team to introduce transformative practices and methods like DevOps, continuous delivery, automation, among others, into your organization? When you try to implement them do you find they just don't seem to get traction?



The theory of disruptive innovation was described by Harvard Business professor Clayton Christensen in his book "The Innovator's Dilemma" and show hows certain kinds of innovations create a new value network and ultimately a new market thereby "disrupting" the status quo. He explains that many companies and organizations cannot innovate disruptively themselves and consequently lose their market position. Christensen's proposed solution is that organizations must disrupt themselves and cannibalize their own existing value networks. The challenge then becomes how to do introduce and sustain this into the organization. DevOps practices, tools, and culture, from a traditional enterprise operation perspective, can be modeled as disruptive innovation. Organizations can use the disruptive innovation model to drive their transformation to DevOps.



This presentation will provide a successful pattern for introducing DevOps into an organization using the disruptive innovation model with examples from Ancestry.com's transformation to DevOps and continuous delivery.



Presentation Outline

-Introduction to the model of disruptive innovation

(15m) The Model of Disruptive Innovation

-disruptive vs sustaining innovation

-characteristics of the existing value network

-why organizations can't innovate or respond to innovation threats

-how DevOps challenges most enterprise operations value networks

(15m) The Innovator's Solution: how to cannibalize your existing value

-The innovation leader

-Organizational model for disruption

-Establishing the vision and plan

-Executing the plan

-Cannibalize!

-Integration back to the core

(30m) Case Study: DevOps "disruption" at Ancestry.com

-the challenge and existing situation

-leading the innovation

-the DevOps team and why it is/was important

-maturing the innovation

-bringing others along

-killing the old

-integration back into the core business

-mistakes and challenges

-results, effect on the business, and ongoing impact

(5m) How to evaluate your situation: disrupt or not

(10m) Q&A


Speakers
avatar for John Esser

John Esser

Director Engineering Productivity, Ancestry.com
John is currently the Director of Engineering Productivity at Ancestry.com. His team’s mission is to accelerate engineering’s ability to deliver value to the customer. He is the architect of Ancestry’s transformation to Agile development and continuous delivery. John has more than 25 years software development experience working for such companies as IBM, Corel, Callware Technologies, and Control4. His spare time is gobbled up by his... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola 5/6

10:45

7 Ways to Sabotage a Culture Change (Bill Wake, Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity filling up

Is your your organization or team moving to the latest software development fad? Learn the art of sabotage!

Learn how to prevent it from succeeding, or to reduce it to the “flavor of the month” so it’s irrelevant in the long term.

We’ll explore seven ways to sabotage the transition, ranging from the over-controlling “Let One Flower Bloom” to the subtle “Muddy the Motives.”

For your safety, we’ll look at how methods' proponents may sneakily try to counteract each sabotage.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic
Software development as a thinking art | Transitioning to Agile from Whatever | Programming Languages | Microhabits | Refactoring, TDD, Programming, Testing, Managing | Flying drones for fun | NOT POLITICS NOR SPORTS. I'm not qualified.
avatar for Bill Wake

Bill Wake

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic, Inc.
Bill Wake (www.xp123.com) is a consultant with Industrial Logic, Inc. (http://industriallogic.com). Before that, he was an independent consultant from 2001 to 2007, then spent two years managing software development at Gene Codes Forensics. Bill has worked with teams in a variety of domains, including biotechnology, financial systems, web sales, and more. Hes the co-author of Design Patterns in Java and Refactoring in Ruby.



Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Miami

10:45

Increase Your Organization's Effectiveness Through Value-stream Mapping. (Adam Yuret, Jabe Bloom)
Limited Capacity full

How much of your team's time is taken up scrambling to resolve engineering escalations? Does Marketing or the executive staff drop work in your team's head at the last minute? How do you communicate the importance of managing these competing priorities? Value-stream mapping may just be an answer.



A Value Stream Map is a visual representation of the steps required to complete work. It sounds scary, and traditional approaches can be mind numbing. We've modified this process to be lightweight and to encourage understanding and collaboration across departments and teams.



In this workshop Jabe Bloom and I will provide an brief introduction to the general concepts of flow-efficiency and queuing theory. We’ll explain why these are a problem in most organizations and then introduce the visual language of value-stream mapping. Then we’ll lead the group in an actual value-stream mapping exercise mapping a common shared process or experience.



Once we have practiced creating a Value Stream we will review the practical requirement for running a VSM Workshop in your business including:

* Who you should invite to a VSM

* Example Timing and Schedules for a workshop

* What to do with the VSM after a successful workshop





When we’re finished we’ll run a brief lean coffee style debrief of the experience.

Speakers
avatar for Jabe Bloom

Jabe Bloom

President & Principle Consultant, Coherent Insight
I try to collect and tell interesting stories about the future. | | Sometimes, when the stories are are compelling enough, people use them to make interesting things. | | I am an award-winning international speaker on Lean Software and Product Development, Agile, and Lean Management. | | President and Principal Consultant at Coherent Insight, Chief Flow Officer at Praxis Flow | | Pursuing a PhD at Carnegie Mellon.
avatar for Adam Yuret

Adam Yuret

Founder/Consultant, Context Driven Agility
Adam Yuret is an experienced systems thinker who has consulted small non-profits and fortune 100 clients on adopting context-driven systems to solving difficult problems. Adam started Context Driven Agility in 2010 to share his passion for humanistic flow-based systems full time. He’s been consulting organizations and teams to adapt to their respective contexts using collaborative approaches and lean principles to great effect. Context Driven... Read More →


Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sanibel

10:45

Stalking Agile Success in the Wilds of Enterprise Scaling (George Dinwiddie)
Limited Capacity seats available

One of the biggest issues of Enterprise Agile is knowing what's going on across the enterprise from the vantage point of upper management (or even middle management). The most common strategy seems to be trying to standardize everything so that you can pretend the numbers are comparable across the organization and "manage by spreadsheet." Such an approach is comfortably familiar to managers in many companies, but tends to squeeze the Agile out of Enterprise Agile, If practiced heavy-handedly, this becomes just another form of command and control management, leaving a legion of identical-looking squads of programming resources death-marching across an endless desert of product backlogs.



Wily managers realize that it's not required to enforce uniformity in order to scale. They know that "normalized story points" hide more information than they reveal, that not all important data can be expressed in numerical terms, and even numerical data may be more valuable when not added or averaged.



Tracking animals is the art of using environmental clues to discover the presence of animals and to understand their movements and habits. In this workshop we’ll explore some of the techniques of animal trackers, and apply their lessons to the problem of nuanced scaling. We’ll learn ways to know what’s going on at the team level without burdening the teams with bureaucratic reporting. We’ll spot the hidden gaps, acute dangers, and chronic malaise that might surprise the unwary. We’ll gain the information we need to accomplish control of the Enterprise without being controlling.



*Note:* No teams or managers are injured in this session. We're tracking to gather information, not hunting.


Speakers
avatar for George Dinwiddie

George Dinwiddie

Software Development Coach, iDIA Computing
George Dinwiddie helps organizations develop software more effectively. He brings thirty-five years of development experience from electronic hardware and embedded firmware to business information technology. He helps organizations, managers, and teams solve the problems they face by providing consulting, coaching, mentoring and training at the organizational, process, team, interpersonal, and technical levels. Involved in the Agile community... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola A

10:45

People, System, Culture: Where Leadership Thrives (Pawel Brodzinski)
Limited Capacity seats available

If, as Jerry Weinberg points, leadership is a process of creating an environment where people become empowered let’s focus on how we create and evolve environments we work at.



One thing is how we build our teams. If we focus only on technical skills we won’t cover the leadership gap.



Another issue is the system. As W. Edwards Deming famously said, a bad system will defeat a good person every time. If we hire great people but put them in highly constrained environment they won’t thrive.



Lastly, we have an organizational culture, which is a steering force behind everyday leadership acts or lack of them. It is also one of the main reasons why many transformations fail.



I will show how all these areas are inseparably interconnected and how we need to change all three to evolve toward participatory leadership. The end result is that every team member overtakes a role of a leader dynamically, depending on the context.



Research on collective intelligence shows how flawed our recruitment approaches are. Experience of system thinkers suggests how much potential is hidden in improving the system. Finally, an organizational culture is what adds meaning to our actions thus is a crucial enabler of change of our behaviors. These are building blocks of the participatory leadership approach.



This isn’t just a theory. In Lunar Logic we’ve put this theory into practice. You will learn our story along with why we believe it works. Even though some of the ideas shared during the session may sound counter-intuitive or even radical we are the living proof that it can be done.

Speakers
avatar for Pawel Brodzinski

Pawel Brodzinski

Chief Cook and Bottle-Washer, Lunar Logic
Pawel Brodzinski is a leader, a team builder and a change agent, but most of all he is an always experimenting practitioner trying to make his teams work better (and learn in the process).He is an active member of global Lean Kanban community. He led the first Kanban implementation in software industry in Poland.Pawel leads Lunar Logic (http://lunarlogic.io), an off-shore web software shop, where he practices of what he preaches. He blogs sharing... Read More →



Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Osceola B

10:45

Don't just show, don't just tell, focus on the experience! (Erwin van der Koogh)
Limited Capacity seats available

As Confucius said:

> I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.



I have been giving Agile introduction/values talks for years and most of them were pretty good.

But recently I decided to try something new and completely redesign my Agile Values course from scratch as a real workshop. And the results were beyond my wildest expectations. Ratings, engagement and understanding went through the roof. It quickly got the nickname the "Agile Intensive" because participants are busy experiencing the Agile Values through games, exercises and discussions before I even mention the Agile Manifesto.



I will use the Agile Intensive workshop as an example of how you can take learning/training to another level. You will learn how to get people to experience what you want to teach, and how to facilitate peer to peer learning.

Speakers
EV

Erwin van der Koogh

Chief Wow Officer, Bankwest
A true Maven Erwin is always looking for new cool ideas to collect, share and mix up.


Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Sun C

10:45

Learning to Manage Dependencies and Maximize Value in Release Planning (Alan Goerner)
Limited Capacity full

Dependency Poker is an agile learning game about release planning. It is a simulation of multi-team planning and coordination at the program/product-line level, over the 5 sprints of a release cycle, with interdependencies -- indeed, with some very nasty, very realistic interdependencies. The game is played by 4 teams, each with a unique persona and a unique "superpower", i.e. a technique that only they can use to help resolve impediments confronting them. Work is represented by feature and story cards which highlight the dependencies between these units of work. The objective of the game is to deliver the most feature value for the program/product-line by the end of the release cycle.



This highly-interactive game gives players hands-on experience in the basic principles of release planning, dependency management, and operation of a Scrum-of-Scrums. To succeed, teams must address a number of common conflicts including: sequencing of work, unplanned work from other teams, local (our team) versus global (our product) optimization of value, managing work-in-progress, while leaving enough time for integration testing. To survive, teams must employ fast-paced decision-making to discover and resolve dependencies and make sprint plans for the next sprint. This real-life simulation drives home the understanding that there is no time for big-analysis-up-front and that little unpleasant surprises lurk (seemingly) around every corner. Come join us! See for yourself that there *are* things we can do to manage chaos and "win" at Dependency Poker!

Speakers
AG

Alan Goerner

Vice President, Agile Services & Solutions, UST Global



Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Naples

10:45

Economically Sensible Scrum (Ken Rubin)
Limited Capacity filling up

I’ve witnessed many teams perform excellent Scrum yet their organizations still don’t get the business results they need or expect. Why? Because they fail to perform something I call Economically Sensible Scrum. Come prepared to discuss where and why your organization is failing to achieve its agile goals and what you can do about it!

Speakers

Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Gainesville

10:45

Disintegration Testing (David Hoppe)
Limited Capacity seats available

Have you ever been testing a large project and been stuck while trying to isolate a specific behavior and thought there must be a better way? While on a recent project David Hoppe thought the same thing. He noticed that the primary way that the system was being tested was as an integrated whole. There was little opportunity to test individual components in isolation. With a little effort the system could be broken apart (disintegrated) allowing quicker testing with easier isolation of issues that can be extremely difficult to track down in an integrated system. During this session we will begin with a brief introduction to how this idea came about with concrete examples. Then quickly move through a demonstration of disintegration testing with a data processing application will be presented and discussed. After the demonstration we will “get our hands dirty” with an interactive exercise with a fun web application starting with a fully integrated product, we can develop some test ideas and try to find and isolate the behavior of the application. Next we will break it apart to dig into the inner workings of the application testing smaller and smaller sections until we find a point where it is easy to isolate and identify the ways that components are misbehaving. We will wrap up with time for questions and suggestions on how to take this with you and use it in real life. Please bring a laptop, tablet or smart-phone so you can follow along with the activities in this session.


Speakers
DH

David Hoppe

Technical Problem Solver, Excelon Development
David Hoppe has been developing software for nearly two decades constantly seeking to improve the craft personally and with people around him. David is the Chief Technical Problem Solver at Excelon Development, a boutique consulting firm based in West Michigan. David recently wrapped up a web performance engineering project for an Excelon client to rave reviews and is excited to share some lessons learned.



Thursday July 31, 2014 10:45 - 12:00
Tallahassee

10:45

How Agile UX and guerrilla testing helped change government policy (Kevin Murray, Imran Younis)
Limited Capacity seats available

This session describes two very different UK government projects where we have taken a UX and user needs driven development approach. The presentation will show how using key UX techniques like guerrilla testing we have been able to influence and change the set in stone government policy.



The first project is the new digital Carer's Allowance service. We will explain UX techniques which brought the average claim entry time down from 1 hour to 16 minutes and ensured a doubling in the digital uptake percentage. More importantly we can explain how guerrilla testing for what is a very emotive benefit allowed us to soften and even remove question considered mandatory by the policy team. We will show a number of videos of the real user testing, some of these are hum